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Let Kenyans in Diaspora support one another and not be quick to share stories of their misfortune

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By Njeeri Kez

Kenyans in the diaspora….. We are failing each other. When one of us gets in the murk of things with the law, it is our duty to be ambassadors of the truth. If the said person is guilty or not, we are so far from home that it is our duty to support the families left behind in whatever way possible.

For us to share widely pictures and stories of allegations and then put in our fertile imaginations as contributing chat topics is just out of line. Some of us put names and details of deaths online even before families in Kenya are notified. STOP! Let’s wait for the rule of law and due process on matters still in court. Even if you do not respect the alleged perpetrators, at least respect their families. We know how our community is small.

Everyone knows everyone. These people have wives, children and close relatives who then have to deal with the aftermath of these online character obliterations that inadvertently spill over because of their relationships. Have you ever stopped to think of what that would do to someone looking to build their lives afterwards if found innocent and the first thing that comes up on their name search is such online vitriol?

If we’re going to report on issues, please let us be sensitive of the domino effects. Also, let us make sure that if we absolutely have to share that we are sharing facts and truth only, and not what we think the facts and truth should be. When we contribute to discussions on such, please remember that their families are here in these social media streets.

No one would want to be held hostage by the actions of another person even if that person is a family member. Please be careful of who you interact with, who you trust, who you bring into your circle and please please PLEASE do not drive drunk. Let us all jealously guard our integrity, our dignity, our dreams, our children’s well being. We are so far from home let’s be our brother’s keepers. Have a blessed end week.

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Below are some of the reactions on Facebook:

Kell Njoki I agree offcourse partially . I think you should also address the families that “we are protecting”. What are they telling the news media, bloggers?? Are you just putting your family crisis out there? If you are caught in a disaster like mentioned above hold back for a minute or months before commenting. Sometimes news come from your own family.
I’ve been in situations where people talkedddddddddd buttttttttt no one had published anything without my consent. Was I contacted? Absolutely!!! Did I agree to putting my family on media hellllll no!!
That last part I it KNOW your circle. Social media will break you or make you. And we have to understand just coz 5-10 of us share news (like I do) don’t mean we are not supporting sometimes people are raising awareness. Shi* happens no man is an island ~~~~~~~ that DUI I will not even comment .
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· Reply · 2 hrs

Njeeri Kez
Njeeri Kez Kell Njoki I cannot control what anyone else decides to do or not to do. However, I can be empathetic enough to respect those who are going through a tough time by virtue of their being related to others regardless of whichever side they’re on, accused or victim, guilty or innocent. As of your point on raising awareness, what awareness is being raised by sharing a mugshot?
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Kell Njoki
Kell Njoki Posting others Mugshot is being malicious!!!! It’s public information but no one needs to post others mugshot~~~~ . ……….. reason I said I agree and don’t agree some shares are not hurtful how we respond or comments makes the difference. All in all we are becoming a generation of sensitivity that we are ignoring things that are hurting us and our future generation in names of “let’s keep it cool”… a lady up there talked about DUI for example no families want to go through that does that mean we can’t discuss that?? Alcohol abuse? We hurt including my family does that mean I can’t share my views?? It’s all on how we do it…………. social media comments you have to chose what to take in and what to ignore. I last about 6 months have seen the rape cases within our community and am just like is this new or social media shares has got me into seeing more of this cases?? ‍♀️‍♀️ now am aware to continueeeeeee adding on that list of not trusting even my own with girls
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· Reply · 1 hr · Edited

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Njeeri Kez
Njeeri Kez Kell Njoki apples and oranges. We need to discuss issues that affect us as a community but that DOESN’T include other people’s specific legal issues, complete with mugshots and details. Start a conversation on alcoholism and I’ll gladly contribute. Post an article on alleged rape and have people speculate on all kinds of crass details and gloat on how they’re not behind bars and you lose me on your argument.
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Kell Njoki
Kell Njoki Welllll there is that group that thinks it’s an island ~~~~~~~ you either learn from them or ignore them. Their mugshot might be around the corner. ‍♀️‍♀️‍♀️. Just saying we are quick to say we are perfect till hell breaks .
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· Reply · 1 hr · Edited

Lilian Raquel
Lilian Raquel I think it’s one thing to share a mug shot and another to criticize it as what is going on with “us” type of mentality that is already labeling the situation along with the group of people. That doesn’t come off as it’s being a genuine perspective coz what is the point of posting it if it’s not to rectify and edify the situation. It’s like opening a line of anyone to judge label the individual without any basis of knowing his side of the story. That is what irks me all in the name of ” I care for us” that’s bs. I truly truly agree with ur point Njeeri Kez!! Nkt!
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· Reply · 30 mins · Edited

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Bmj Muriithi

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Philip Osoro
Philip Osoro Well said
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Diana Gaitha
Diana Gaitha Well said!!
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Peter Kerre
Peter Kerre YES YES YES Njeeri

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Supuu Rehema
Supuu Rehema Ebu make this public so I can share Njeeri Kez

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Njeeri Kez
Njeeri Kez Done love

· Reply · 1 hr

Bmj Muriithi

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Mackenzie Ithe Wa Ndung'u
Mackenzie Ithe Wa Ndung’u I couldn’t agree more.

Isaac Kuria
Isaac Kuria Well articulated. Be well Njeeri Kez. Good job!

Njoroge Wa Ngige
Njoroge Wa Ngige Hatuskii la mwadhini wala la mteka maji kisimani. Mbona tusijengane kwa mambo ya uchumi. Kwanini tukimbie wakati maji yamezoleka. Tuungane tufanye biashara, kwani tulikuja majuu tuvurugane Na masaibu na hisia zisizo tupeleka mbele. Tuanzishe benki za Diaspora Na kadhalika…hayo ndio maendeleo muhimu Na ya dhati. Jengana kikazi, tuwe busy kehesabu dollar Na sio umbea …Mengine ni mtodogoo tugange ya Kweli. Walokosa waombe msamaha tusonge mbele. Mungu tuangazie. samngige.blogspot.com

Shadows of Life

SAMNGIGE.BLOGSPOT.COM|BY SAMCICERO

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Diaspora

Kenyans among 300 people arrested over international online scams

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A global operation targeting online scams has led to nearly 300 arrests in 12 countries including Kenya.

According to Voice of America, the suspects include 167 from Nigeria, 74 in the United States, 18 in Turkey and 15 in Ghana.

Other arrests were in Turkey, Ghana, France, Italy, Japan, Malaysia and Britain.

A statement from the U.S Justice Department (DOJ) said: “Foreign citizens perpetrate many BEC scams.  Those individuals are often members of transnational criminal organizations, which originated in Nigeria but have spread throughout the world,” the statement reads.

The four month operation was led by the DOJ and the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC).

During the operation, $3.7 million (Ksh.384million) was recovered, the U.S Justice Department (DOJ) said.

Christopher Wray, the FBI director warned: ”We’re sending a clear message to the criminals who orchestrate these BEC schemes.”

The DOJ listed some of the scams that the fraudsters used to con their victims:

  • Romance scams
  • Employment opportunities scams,
  • Fraudulent online vehicle sales scams
  • Rental scams
  • Lottery scams

Among those arrested in Nigeria were 77 Nigerian suspects recently indicted in the United States on conspiracy charges of swindling businesses and individuals through a variety of internet scams, Nigeria’s Economic and Financial Crimes Commission said.

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The Nigerians allegedly used so-called Business Email Compromise schemes, “romance fraud” and schemes targeting the elderly to steal millions of dollars from their victims in the United States and elsewhere before transferring the funds to Nigeria through an extensive money laundering network, according to a 252-count federal grand jury indictment unsealed last month.

Others arrested during the recent operation face similar charges.

In the southern U.S. state of Georgia, two Nigerian nationals were arrested in connection with fraudulently directing a transfer of $3.5 million from a health care provider to accounts across the United States. In Miami, two others were charged with laundering more than $950,000 of proceeds of BEC scams and recruiting about 18 others to serve as “money mules.”

Widely used by Nigerian fraudsters, Business Email Compromise schemes involve targeting employees with access to company finances and tricking them into making unauthorized wire transfers into accounts controlled by swindlers.

$26 billion online scam

According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, Business Email Compromise is a $26 billion online scam. Last year, BEC and its variant, Email Account Compromise, resulted in losses of nearly $1.3 billion, nearly twice as much as 2017.

Operation reWired was part of the Justice Department’s intensified efforts in recent years to crack down on internet financial fraud. Among other measures, the department has set up an internal BEC Counteraction Group to coordinate cases.

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Through the arrests, “we’re sending a clear message to the criminals who orchestrate these BEC schemes: We’ll keep coming after you, no matter where you are,” FBI Director Christopher Wray said. “And to the public, we’ll keep doing whatever we can to protect you.”

U.S. and Nigerian officials credited the mass arrests to close cooperation and coordination between their law enforcement agencies.

“Our efforts in coordinating the EFCC/FBI joint operations in Nigeria recorded tremendous successes” against “the infamous yahoo-yahoo boys,” said the EFCC’s director of information, Mohammed Abba, according to AFP.

U.S. Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said the Justice Department has “increased efforts” to combat cyber-enabled financial crimes.

“The coordinated efforts with our domestic and international law enforcement partners around the world has made these most recent actions more successful,” Rosen said.

U.S. officials didn’t say whether they have asked Nigerian authorities to extradite the suspects wanted in multiple U.S. jurisdictions from California to Florida.

Hassan Mohammed Hassan, Nigeria’s deputy ambassador to the U.S., told VOA last month that Nigeria will consider any extradition request based on a “verifiable” case.

Last year, a law enforcement operation aimed at BEC scams resulted in the arrest of 74 people and the seizure of $2.4 million, according to the Justice Department.

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-AGENCIES

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Diaspora

USCIS Announces Citizenship and Assimilation Grant Opportunities

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U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) recently announced that it is accepting applications for two funding opportunities under the Citizenship and Assimilation Grant Program that will provide up to $10 million in grants for citizenship preparation programs in communities across the country.

These competitive grant opportunities are open to organizations that prepare lawful permanent residents for naturalization and promote civic assimilation through increased knowledge of English, U.S. history, and civics.

USCIS seeks to expand availability of high-quality citizenship and assimilation services throughout the country with these two grant opportunities:

  • Citizenship Instruction and Naturalization Application Services. (PDF) This grant opportunity will fund up to 36 organizations that offer both citizenship instruction and naturalization application services to lawful permanent residents. Applications are due by Aug. 13, 2019.
  • The Refugee and Asylee Assimilation Program. (PDF) This grant opportunity will fund up to four organizations to provide individualized services to lawful permanent residents who entered the United States under the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program or were granted asylum. These services will help them to obtain the skills and knowledge required for successful citizenship and to foster a sense of belonging and attachment to the United States. This grant strives to promote long-term civic assimilation of those lawful permanent residents who have identified naturalization as a goal, yet may need additional information, instruction and services to attain it. Applications are due by Aug. 13, 2019.
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USCIS will take into account various program and organizational factors, including past grantee performance, when making final award decisions. In addition, all funded grant recipients must enroll in E-Verify as a regular employer within 30 days of receiving the award and remain as a participant in good standing with E-Verify throughout the entire period of grant performance. Funded grant recipients will be required to verify all new hires at hiring locations performing work on a program or activity that is funded in whole or in part under the grant.

USCIS expects to announce award recipients in September.

Since it began in 2009, the USCIS Citizenship and Assimilation Grant Program has awarded approximately $82 million through 393 grants to immigrant-serving organizations in 38 states and the District of Columbia.

To apply for one of these funding opportunities, visit grants.gov. For additional information on the Citizenship and Assimilation Grant Program for fiscal year 2019, visit uscis.gov/grants or email the USCIS Office of Citizenship at citizenshipgrantprogram@uscis.dhs.gov.

For more information on USCIS and our programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), Instagram (/uscis), YouTube (/uscis), and Facebook (/uscis).

 

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US welcomed 756,000 new Citizens last year, set to welcome 34,000 this month

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WASHINGTON—Did you know that more than 756,000 people became new U.S. citizens in 2018? That’s one new citizen every 42 seconds! Share in the celebration during Constitution Week.

USCIS announced Friday that it will celebrate Constitution Day and Citizenship Day by welcoming nearly 34,300 new U.S. citizens during 316 naturalization ceremonies across the nation between Sept. 13 and 23.

The USCIS Constitution Week activities will feature a naturalization ceremony at the DAR Constitution Hall on Sept. 17, where USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli will administer the Oath of Allegiance and provide congratulatory remarks to 1,000 new U.S. citizens. View a list of other notable 2019 Constitution Week-themed naturalization ceremonies.

“Two hundred and thirty-two years ago, our great country adopted the United States Constitution, and as we celebrate Constitution Week, it is important to underscore the significance of citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution,” said Acting Director Cuccinelli. “These nearly 34,300 new U.S. citizens followed the law on their path to naturalization and now call the U.S. home. I can think of no better way to celebrate Constitution Week than to welcome thousands of new U.S. citizens who have assimilated, made a commitment to our great country, and have vowed to support the Constitution.”

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On Sept. 17, the nation observes Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, as part of Constitution Week (Sept. 17 to 23 this year). The commemoration honors both the signing of the Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787, and an observance that began in 1940 as “I Am an American Day.” Citizenship Day began in 1952, based on a law signed by President Harry Truman, and in 1955, President Dwight Eisenhower proclaimed the first Constitution Week.

This time of year serves as an opportunity to celebrate the connection between the Constitution and citizenship and reflect on the meaning of becoming a citizen of the United States. USCIS welcomes approximately 650,000 to 750,000 citizens each year during naturalization ceremonies across the United States and around the world. In fiscal year 2018, USCIS naturalized more than 756,000 people, a five-year high in new oaths of citizenship.

To help applicants prepare to become U.S. citizens, USCIS provides study materials and resources available through the Citizenship Resource Center. In addition, the only official USCIS Civics Test application, USCIS: Civics Test Study Tools, is a mobile app that challenges users’ civic knowledge and is currently available for download in the Google Play and iTunes stores.

Following each naturalization ceremony, USCIS encourages new U.S. citizens and their families and friends to share their naturalization photos on social media using the hashtags #newUScitizen, #ConstitutionWeek, and #WethePeople.

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For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit uscis.gov or follow them on Twitter (@uscis), Instagram (/uscis), YouTube (/uscis), Facebook (/uscis), and LinkedIn (/uscis).

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