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Shock as Kenyan man in US dies suddenly

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We regret to announce the sudden death of Ernest Sila Mwololo, 27years old, of Prospect Park, NJ which occurred on Monday, May 1st, 2017.

Ernest was the son of Richard Mwololo and Rose Mwololo (Mama Chakula) of Prospect Park, NJ. Brother to Judy Mwololo of Nairobi, Kenya, Fridah and Martha Mwololo of NJ. Cousin to Grace, George, Victor Nyeki and Anne Ndumi of New Jersey. And Uncle to Edna and Emma Nyeki, among others of NJ.

Friends and family are meeting daily at his parent’s residence at 120 Prescott Ave, Prospect Park, NJ 07508 for prayers.

A fundraising to meet the funeral expenses and help repatriate his body to his final resting place in Machakos, Kenya will be held on Sunday, May 7th 2017 at Seminary Baptist Church, 193 Haledon Ave, Paterson, NJ 07522 at 2:00 pm

A Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, May 9th 2017 at Seminary Baptist Church, 193 Haledon Ave, Paterson, NJ 07522 from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

For those unable to attend the fundraising  and wish to help the family please use…

  • CashApp
    • Fridah Mwololo ($Loloh) – (862)262-7921
    • Rose Mwololo – ($RoseMwololo) (973)914-6436
  • Bank Account
    • PNC – Rose M. Mwololo
    • Account #: 8046613458
    • Routing#: 031207607
  • GoFundMe: gofundme.com/ErnestMwololo
READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Was this young Kenyan shot dead by cops in Atlanta really a drug/weapons criminal?

For further information please contact,

  • Maria Mwikali – (201) 320-3048
  • George Nyeki – (973 )632-1137
  • Anne Ndumi – (240) 481-5313
  • Nellie Nzisa – (908) 331-1961
  • Grace Nyeki – (973) 870-5476

John 14:1-4: “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You believe in God; believe also in me. My Father’s house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you?  And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am. You know the way to the place where I am going.”

Thank You and Be Blessed

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Diaspora

Kenyan students in US ponder next move after order to leave

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International students, among them hundreds of Kenyans currently in the US, are scrambling to figure out what next a week after America’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) rolled out new guidelines stating that those whose institutions were only offering online classes would be required to leave the country.

ICE and the Student and Exchange Visitor Program also say new student visas won’t be granted for online-only instruction. The agencies cited the Covid-19 pandemic in making the changes.

“This rule has brought a lot of anxiety and fear among us Kenyan international students in the US. The directive is not even clear and so there’s just uncertainty and we don’t know what to do,” said Mordecai Njoroge, a Kenyan-born student at Cornerstone University in Michigan.

Mr Njoroge is one of an estimated 3,451 Kenyan students enrolled in US institutions of higher learning in the 2018- 2019 academic year, who could be affected by the changes.

SCHOCKER

The new guidelines from ICE state that international students would be forced to leave the US or transfer to other colleges if their schools entirely offer classes online this fall.

This rule came as a shocker to many colleges, students, and professors with most big universities and colleges scrambling to go to court to stop it.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Was this young Kenyan shot dead by cops in Atlanta really a drug/weapons criminal?

“I have been receiving a lot of phone calls from my students in New York asking to know what this exactly means to them. Many are feeling that they are being unfairly punished because the university does not offer face-to-face classes for the Fall because of unprecedented Covid-19 pandemic conditions beyond their control,” Said Prof David Monda, a lecturer at City University of New York (CUNY)

He noted that poorly thought out policy of US immigration has thrown the educational plans of many foreign students into disarray. They could lose their scholarships and get deported for being out of status. In addition, Prof Monda said, many students are themselves parents which poses the real challenge of separating families.

“To me, this appears to be a blatant political ploy from the Trump Administration to gain cheap political points on immigration for the November election. It is also a way to force institutions of higher learning to open face-to-face classes prematurely. I’m sure it will become immediately challenged in court. Harvard University and MIT have already begun proceedings,” he added.

ANXIETY

Prof Jerono Rotich, founder and CEO of Kenya Students in Diaspora (KESID) Foundation said majority of international students are grappling with this new development that they are now living in heightened fear, anxiety and uncertainty in the midst of the pandemic.

READ ALSO:   Sad day as broadcaster Njoki Ndegwa of Jambo Radio passes away in Dallas, Texas

She says the announcement has sparked immediate and intense confusion and is likely to disrupt normal semester activities.

“The unsettling feeling for most of these students is the thought of abandoning studies, the uncertainties of their health especially in airports if they have to travel back home given the recent cases of a majority of airline workers contracting Covid-19 and most succumbing to it,” she said.

Prof Rotich said this move, ignores the preparation, plans and investment international students had in place for the remainder of the year.

“Literally, it throws them under the bus! Bypassing years of tumultuous pain and the sacrifice (financial and emotional) international students go through to get to the US for better education. Given that most came to the US for quality education, it raises more questions than answers on the future of international students in the US. If a looming pandemic can threaten the place of the international students in the US, then it raises doubts for anyone planning to enrol for future education in the US,” she added.

BIG QUESTION

Mr Njoroge wondered what had changed to make the Trump administration resort to such extreme measures given that earlier this year, the Department of Homeland Security had given some flexibility for the students by allowing most of us to end the semester online.

READ ALSO:   SAVE THE DATE: Kenya USA Diaspora Sacco AGM is coming up

Mr Njoroge noted many colleges have plans to institute hybrid classes that entail online and face-to-face interactions.

“The biggest question now is what implications will this have on our studies in the short and long term? What happens when schools start physical lessons and potentially go online again due to the potential second wave,” he wondered.

By Chris Wamalwa, Sunday Nation

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Diaspora

Kenyan students in US ponder next move after order to leave

Published

on

International students, among them hundreds of Kenyans currently in the US, are scrambling to figure out what next a week after America’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) rolled out new guidelines stating that those whose institutions were only offering online classes would be required to leave the country.

ICE and the Student and Exchange Visitor Program also say new student visas won’t be granted for online-only instruction. The agencies cited the Covid-19 pandemic in making the changes.

“This rule has brought a lot of anxiety and fear among us Kenyan international students in the US. The directive is not even clear and so there’s just uncertainty and we don’t know what to do,” said Mordecai Njoroge, a Kenyan-born student at Cornerstone University in Michigan.

Mr Njoroge is one of an estimated 3,451 Kenyan students enrolled in US institutions of higher learning in the 2018- 2019 academic year, who could be affected by the changes.

The new guidelines from ICE state that international students would be forced to leave the US or transfer to other colleges if their schools entirely offer classes online this fall.

This rule came as a shocker to many colleges, students, and professors with most big universities and colleges scrambling to go to court to stop it.

READ ALSO:   Sad day as broadcaster Njoki Ndegwa of Jambo Radio passes away in Dallas, Texas

“I have been receiving a lot of phone calls from my students in New York asking to know what this exactly means to them. Many are feeling that they are being unfairly punished because the university does not offer face-to-face classes for the Fall because of unprecedented Covid-19 pandemic conditions beyond their control,” Said Prof David Monda, a lecturer at City University of New York (CUNY)

He noted that poorly thought out policy of US immigration has thrown the educational plans of many foreign students into disarray. They could lose their scholarships and get deported for being out of status. In addition, Prof Monda said, many students are themselves parents which poses the real challenge of separating families.

“To me, this appears to be a blatant political ploy from the Trump Administration to gain cheap political points on immigration for the November election. It is also a way to force institutions of higher learning to open face-to-face classes prematurely. I’m sure it will become immediately challenged in court. Harvard University and MIT have already begun proceedings,” he added.

ANXIETY

Prof Jerono Rotich, founder and CEO of Kenya Students in Diaspora (KESID) Foundation said majority of international students are grappling with this new development that they are now living in heightened fear, anxiety and uncertainty in the midst of the pandemic.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Raila taken to task by CNN, says only 3.5M Kenyans voted

She says the announcement has sparked immediate and intense confusion and is likely to disrupt normal semester activities.

“The unsettling feeling for most of these students is the thought of abandoning studies, the uncertainties of their health especially in airports if they have to travel back home given the recent cases of a majority of airline workers contracting Covid-19 and most succumbing to it,” she said.

Prof Rotich said this move, ignores the preparation, plans and investment international students had in place for the remainder of the year.

“Literally, it throws them under the bus! Bypassing years of tumultuous pain and the sacrifice (financial and emotional) international students go through to get to the US for better education. Given that most came to the US for quality education, it raises more questions than answers on the future of international students in the US. If a looming pandemic can threaten the place of the international students in the US, then it raises doubts for anyone planning to enrol for future education in the US,” she added.

BIG QUESTION

Mr Njoroge wondered what had changed to make the Trump administration resort to such extreme measures given that earlier this year, the Department of Homeland Security had given some flexibility for the students by allowing most of us to end the semester online.

READ ALSO:   SAD NEWS: 34 year old Kenyan Pastor's son dies of cardiac arrest in Arizona, USA

Mr Njoroge noted many colleges have plans to institute hybrid classes that entail online and face-to-face interactions.

“The biggest question now is what implications will this have on our studies in the short and long term? What happens when schools start physical lessons and potentially go online again due to the potential second wave,” he wondered.

-By Chris Wamalwa, nation.co.ke

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Diaspora

Kenyan passport still highly ranked amid Covid-19 pandemic

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The Kenyan passport has defied the Covid-19 pandemic to retain position 72 among the most powerful passports in the world, this according to a newly released Henley Passport Index.

The index, periodically measures the world’s most travel-friendly passports, based on the number of destinations their holders can access visa-free or visa-on-arrival.

VISA-FREE ACCESS

According to the latest index, the Japanese passport opens more doors than any other passport in the world.

The Japanese passport, offering visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 191 destinations around the world, topped the rankings, followed by Singapore (190 destinations) while the South Korean passport tied with the German passport in third place with a score of 189.

The Kenyan passport, whose holder can access 71 destinations around the world without a visa or visa-on-arrival, is ranked at seventh in the continent, behind Seychelles (151 destinations), Mauritius (145), South Africa (101), Botswana (82), Namibia (75), Lesotho (74), and Swaziland (72).

The Kenyan passport also commands a relatively high score in comparison to those from other East African countries.

Amanda Smit, the Managing Partner and Head of South, East, and Central Africa at Henley, hailed the Kenyan passport’s resilience in retaining its position.

TEMPORARY BANS

“The much-considered destinations are the ones which have effectively handled the coronavirus outbreak, and especially those which have declared themselves virus-free. International airline travel is still on halt, but it is to be expected that more people will look at various destinations to settle as soon as airspace is open,” she said.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Diaspora returnee who holds dual Citizenship (US & Kenya) grilled by Parliament after Uhuru nominates her as ambassador

Research using exclusive historical data from the index has revealed that there is a strongly positive connection between visa freedom and a variety of indicators of economic freedom, government integrity, and personal or political freedom.

The Henley Passport Index is based on data provided by the International Air Transport Authority (IATA) and covers 199 passports and 227 travel destinations. It is updated in real time throughout the year, as and when visa policy changes come into effect.

Henley & Partners said the recent ranking did not take temporary bans into account.

The best passports to hold in 2020:

1. Japan (191 destinations)

2. Singapore (190)

3. South Korea, Germany (189)

4. Italy, Finland, Spain, Luxembourg (188)

5. Denmark, Austria (187)

6. Sweden, France, Portugal, Netherlands, Ireland (186)

7. Switzerland, United States, United Kingdom, Norway, Belgium (185)

8. Greece, New Zealand, Malta, Czech Republic (184)

9. Canada, Australia (183)

10. Hungary (181)

The worst passports to hold:

103. North Korea (39 destinations)

104. Libya, Nepal, Palestinian Territory (38)

105. Somalia, Yemen (33)

106. Pakistan (32)

107. Syria (29)

108. Iraq (28)

109. Afghanistan (26)

By Nairobi News

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