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BREAKING: Why Nakuru’s Governor Mbugua has bowed out of the race

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Nakuru Governor Kinuthia Mbugua has stepped down as an independent candidate and thrown his weight behind the Jubilee Party candidate Lee Kinyanjui.

Mbugua stepped down after meeting President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto at State House Nakuru on Saturday morning.

The governor was accompanied by other Jubilee leaders in the county.

Mbugua, the former AP Commandant was defeated by Kinyanjui in the Jubilee nomination polls.

Kinyanjui, former chairman of the National Transport and Safety Authority and a former MP for Nakuru Town garnered 216,385 votes while the incumbent got 150,137.

Former Nacada boss John Mututho was a distant third with 30,487.

Mbugua, one of the senior Jubilee politicians who lost in the party primaries had defected from the Jubilee party.

He said the party primaries were not transparent and were marred by many irregularities.

He was seeking for re-election as an independent candidate.

Mbugua had picked a flamboyant MP aspirant, who lost in the Jubilee nominations for Kuresoi South, Peter Rutto as his running mate.

Rutto is a former finance manager and an ally of Deputy President William Ruto and Energy CS Charles Keter.

 

-The Star

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Shock as Susan Njeri Thomi Kariuki, a Kenyan media entrepreneur in US, dies after short illness


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Courts

Form three girl charged with murder of 20-year-old boyfriend

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A form three girl aged 17 has been charged with murder after she allegedly stabbed her boyfriend to death.

The teenager who appeared before Justice Fred Ochieng today faced murder charges almost a month after she was held for the offense.

According to earlier police reports, the teenager was alleged to have stabbed her boyfriend under unclear circumstances.

“It is not clear what made the girl to stab Julius Odiwuor aged 20 at Polo area in Nyakach Sub-County,” police reports stated.

The girl, according to earlier reports went out to search for Odiwuor after she received word that the man insulted her.

She is said to have grabbed a kitchen knife when she went to look for him.

Odiwuor who is son to a senior police officer in Lamu was rushed to St. Joseph Nyabondo Mission Hospital and later referred to Kericho Referral Hospital where he died while undergoing treatment.

Anyango was arraigned two days later at Nyando Law Courts before Senior Principal Magistrate Samson Temu.

A DCI Officer, David Karanja, requested for more time to conduct and conclude investigations in order to get all the facts surrounding the murder.

“I have not completed investigations and I’m currently waiting for postmortem results of the deceased,” said Karanja.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Chiloba finally speaks out on Msando's death

He added that tension was high at the accused’s home in Nyakach at it would not be safe for her and that it would be good if they kept the girl in custody for 14 days.

Mr. Temu granted the DCI Officer 14 days to complete investigations before she could be arraigned.

During her arraignment, the girl told court that Odhiambo was her boyfriend.

“We are friends who had started dating,” she told the magistrate who asked her about her relationship with the deceased.

On September 23 when the teenager was arraigned at Kisumu High Court, the prosecution counsel, Varoline Lubanga asked that the minor be taken for an age assessment and a counsel that would represent her in the case be appointed.

She also asked that the minor be taken for a mental assessment and that she be remanded at a children’s remand home.

The court ordered that she be taken for COVID-19 test that would be facilitated by Pap Onditi OCS on the same day before being taken to a children’s home.

On Thursday, while appearing before Justice Fred Ochieng, the teenager was charged with murder of Odiwuor.

The charge sheet read that the teenager unlawfully killed Odiwuor on September 7, 2020 at Apoko market center in Nyakach Sub-County within Kisumu County.

READ ALSO:   Tough visa rules for students from Kenya, other countries seeking to study in US

She denied the charges that were read to her.

Her advocate pleaded for favorable bond terms considering that she was a minor.

However, the prosecution counsel opposed her release on bond.

Despite the opposition by the prosecution counsel, the court granted the minor a personal bond of Sh300, 000 with a surety.

Eight witnesses have been lined up for the prosecution of the case.

The case will be mentioned on October 29.

by standard


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Business

The Sh180,000 cat breeders

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People love their pets, but how often do they think about the costs?

For years, Kenyans have been splurging cash on expensive cars, houses, fine wine and whisky, art pieces, and jewellery, but there is a new breed of young wealthy people buying expensive cats.

These cats are rare and their bloodline is documented.

“Human beings like class and social status. Because the rich do not want to remain in the same class with everybody in regards to pet ownership, they are going for Persian, Siamese, and Scottish fold cats,” says Dr Charles Muriuki of Jingi Vet clinic in Nyali, Mombasa.

Considered the ‘Ferrari of cats’, the Persian cats are highly sought-after and admired for their long and thick coats. And they do not come cheap.

“Right now you can get a Persian for about Sh50,000 but a few years ago it cost around Sh100,000, then you add the freight charge, you pay Sh150,000,” says Dr Muriuki.

Pablo and Nura are Persian cats and some of the few in Kenya whose every whim are indulged by their owner Mohamed Shurut.

At his house, during the interview, Mr Shurut says things like ‘let the furry bosses come to you instead of picking them up’, ‘never wake a sleeping kitty.’

To him, the Persian cats are feline royals.

“They are classy, loving and loyal companions. They do not like to be held so much. Give your Persian cat time as it expects you to treat it like a royal,” he says.

Every day, he spends more than an hour brushing their fur. “The fur knots very easily and it’s what makes the cat stand out. I have to groom them every day,” he says, adding that they are best kept indoors but they can be let out on a cat leash.

READ ALSO:   Jomo Kenyatta: I 'll continue fighting for my people for as long as I live [VIDEO]

Many pet lovers scoff at talk about expenses to avoid being judged.

“Sometimes I fend off unwanted questions. Some people do not like pets so they ask me why I waste money on cats. I do what I feel is best for me. I love my cats,” he says.

PERSIAN1509C

A Persian cat owned by Mohammed Shurut. PHOTO | EAUNICE MURATHE

So how much did he spend on the cats?

Between Sh50,000 to Sh100,000 for each of his cats, minus the daily expenses of keeping them happy.

“In a month, you’re probably looking at spending between Sh8,000 to Sh10,000 depending on what kind of cat food you’re buying. I give them fish oil. You also have to factor in the veterinary bills, grooming, litter and multivitamins,” he says.

Another seller

As the exotic cat market is thriving, and supply rarely meeting demand, Mr Shurut found a niche in supplying pet owners with prized breeds.

The 26-year-old now runs an online shop, Persian Cats Kenya, a breeding business.

 

“I used to see social media posts of the Persian cats owned by foreigners. I had a dream of owning one but it is not easy to find them in Kenya,” he says.

After a long search, he bought a kitten from a friend whose Persian cat had given birth.

“He had imported the cats from Egypt. He opted to sell me the male kitten and remain with the parent stock. I started shopping for a female one. I imported a female cat from Egypt,” he says.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Kenyan woman warns slay queens to leave her husband alone

He never imagined the cat hobby he casually picked up would end up becoming a business.

“This year I noted that many people were looking for Persian cats. I had many inquiries, especially on social media. I decided to start importing and breeding the cats,” he says.

Mr Shurut sells two-month-old kittens imported from Russia and Egypt for Sh150,000.

“The common ones are the Doll Face Persian Kittens and Punch face Persian kittens. My female cat is also pregnant and I am hoping to get kittens. The price is fair. Someone who truly values them will get them at any cost,” he says.

Another cat owner Juliet Muchira from Kiambu imported a Persian cat after seeing it online.

“I have always loved cats. I owned my first cat when I was six years old. Four years ago, as I was researching more about cats, I came across the Persian breed and I was interested. I tried finding one locally but didn’t find it. That’s when I thought of importing,” she says. The Persian cat gave birth and she decided to breed them.

She has been doing the business for almost three years now. Her cattery, Juliepaws is registered under The Cat Fanciers’ Association (CFA), the World’s Largest Registry of Pedigreed Cats.

The cost of owning a Persian cat differs, she says, with the needs of a client. The most expensive cat she ever sold cost Sh180,000.

“I sold it to a family in Mombasa a year ago. I have never sold a cat outside Kenya, but I hope to. But I have sold so many kittens locally, Mombasa, Nairobi, and Kiambu. My cattery is the only registered cattery in Kenya,” she says.

The cats come with a registration certificate.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: It is death penalty for high treason of being sworn in as "second president" - AG Githu Muigai

“My cats are all imported and I get them from certified and registered breeders who know their bloodline,” she says, adding that what makes them expensive is their distinctive face, tiny ears, gentle temperaments, and being a pure breed.

Pet love

Traditionally, dogs and cats were working animals than pets. A cat kept the mouse down, a dog guarded homes, and so on. But now, lots of people are latching onto the craze for buying and sharing their homes with pets and choosing to take care of them in ways that our parents did not.

Over the past 10 years or so, human-pet relationships have grown closer, says Dr Muriuki.

“Most people now are embracing the pet culture. They are keeping them as companions, taking care of them. We socialise with pets differently. For example, one cat was coughing and sneezing because the owner had changed her cologne to one that was not cat-friendly. At my clinic, she called her friends, told them that the cat was unwell, took videos and photos as one would do with a child,” he says.

Exotic cats are a huge amount of work and a considerable investment, fuelling an increasingly thriving cat product and service market in Kenya.

However, Dr Muriuki says, the downside of buying the exotic breeds, is that some breeders import male and female cats from the same parents, they inbreed and they start selling inbreeds.

Inbred pedigree cats end up suffering from life-threatening diseases like cancer and deformities.

by Business Daily.co.ke


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Health

Kenyans in US grapple with Covid-19 woes

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His conspicuous Kenyan name, Kariuki, is what gave him out and attracted the attention of a handful of compatriots working at the Philadelphia international airport.

Recently, staff at the airport woke up to news that scores of homeless people had been rounded up by the airport police and the Philadelphia Parking Authority. Among them was Kariuki (first name withheld for privacy reasons), a Days later, the Nation located Mr Kariuki in a shelter for homeless people on Island Avenue in South Philadelphia.

Mr Kariuki, originally from Nakuru County in Kenya’s Rift Valley, came to the US as an undergrad student at Temple university in Philadelphia five years ago.

“My mom, a hawker in Nakuru, raised the initial $10,000 for my tuition and that could only last me a semester and a half. Fortunately, I got a part-time job at the library in college but I still had to work at a local grocery store in the evenings and play drums for my church on Sundays where I was paid $100 every Sunday. Things were okay until Covid-19,” said Mr Kariuki.

A combination of photos of counsellor and clinical consultant Abel Oriri, who is based in Cleveland, Ohio; Geoffrey Chepkwony, who died in August in Texas, US; and David Bulindah, a clinical counsellor based in Seattle, Washington.

When, towards the end of March, the state of Pennsylvania shut down everything including education institutions, hotels and shops — and restricted movement, his world came tumbling down.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Chiloba finally speaks out on Msando's death

“My roommate, in whose name our apartment was registered cancelled the lease and returned to Memphis, Tennessee to his family. For almost three months, I lived in my car. It was hard to find food. The nights were cold. I started developing regular panic attacks that left me feeling like I was going crazy!” he said.

So bad were the panic attacks that police found him at the busy intersection between Island Avenue and Lindberg shouting at motorists and trying to stop them.

“I cannot remember doing this,” he says, although he describes himself at the time as “stressed, depressed and contemplating suicide”.

Psychiatric help

One day, he woke up in some psychiatric facility in West Chester and was told he had been there for three weeks.

“I was totally confused, and heavily sedated. I had nowhere to go but at least I knew I had to leave that place,” he says

Mr Kariuki finally went to the airport because one of his classmates was working at an eatery that had remained open. His friend would occasionally give him a fresh meal and, at least at the airport, he’d enjoy heating during spring and cold air in summer. That was where the authorities found him and other homeless people who they took to shelters.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Kenyan woman warns slay queens to leave her husband alone

Mr Kariuki’s story is unfortunately now just one of the many familiar stories of Kenyans living abroad — made worse by the pandemic.

“It’s of course true to say that Covid-19 has led to a significant increase and demand for mental health intervention due to anxiety and depression. In fact, recent research indicates that more than 53 per cent of adults in the US have reported that their mental health had negatively been impacted directly,” said Kenyan-born counsellor and clinical consultant, Abel Oriri based in Cleveland, Ohio.

Recently, Kenyans in Houston, Texas, were shocked by the death of Geoffrey Chepkwony, who is thought to have committed suicide after his body was found on the streets. He was said to have been struggling with mental health problems. The Kenyan community in the US, led by those in Texas, has been raising the money needed to ship his remains home following a passionate appeal from his mother in Kenya.

Another high-profile case is that of the first Kenyan-born National Football League player, Daniel Adongo, who later fell from grace. His worrying state was depicted in a video clip widely shared online. His family later said they had sought help for him. Coronavirus seems to have exacerbated social and health issues like homelessness, depression and domestic violence, among others.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: It is death penalty for high treason of being sworn in as "second president" - AG Githu Muigai

Support groups

Mr Oriri, who is also a pastor, says most of his clients now describe feelings of depression, anxiety, worry, stress, loneliness, poor appetite, suicidal thoughts and isolation.

“Many report difficulties sleeping, eating, increased alcohol consumption and substance use. Worsening chronic conditions from worry, depression, and stress over Covid-19.

The anger management and domestic violence groups that I have been providing for more than 20 years have surged one hundred percent in enrollment since the pandemic began,” he said in a recent interview.

David Bulindah, a Kenyan Pastoral and Clinical Counsellor based in Seattle, Washington, said the usually structured life of Kenyans in the US was recently disrupted without warning by the coronavirus.

“Most people could not leave their job and or could not go to their second job. For someone who had been enjoying consistent income to suddenly lose all that, stress, anxiety and depression thus kicks in”. he said.

Mr. Bulindah says that the Kenyan community will only deal with these issues if it opens up and discusses mental health and homelessness candidly without pre-judging those affected.

“People should know that it’s okay to lose a job and it’s okay to experience mental health problems. Those affected should not isolate themselves rather, reach out for help,” he said.

By nation.co.ke


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