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VIDEO: Was this young Kenyan shot dead by cops in Atlanta really a drug/weapons criminal?

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BY BMJ MURIITHI

The killing of a 23 year old Atlanta-based Kenyan man whom the police say was being tracked by the anti-narcotic unit since 2013 has left the Kenyan community in the metro Atlanta area and around the US with more questions than answers and elicited a heated debate on the social media.

Whereas some condemn suspected drug related crimes, others say they don’t wholly buy the story by the sheriff’s office as dead men tell no tales.

Some even suspect that race was a key factor in the shooting death of the young man.

In the meantime, Following the untimely death of Joel Gatu Muturi son of Pastor Gatu and Evangelist Lydia Gatu of Austell Georgia, meetings have been scheduled at KACC (771 Elberta Dr, Marietta) on Tuesday 7/4/17 and Friday7/7/17 at 6pm and 7pm respectively. 
Please keep the family in your prayers.

Last week, a deputy shot and killed a suspect as authorities served a drug warrant at an apartment complex in Cobb County, officials said.

The Marietta-Cobb-Smyrna undercover narcotics unit was serving the warrant at the Liberty Point Apartments, located in the 700 block of Franklin Gateway, when the suspect tried to hit deputies with his car, Cobb sheriff’s Lt. Col. Robert Quigley told the press.

The suspect was later identified as 23-year-old Joel Gatu Muturi. Officials have not released the identity of the deputy. Watch related video courtesy of Fox5 Atlanta:

Quigley said drugs and guns were recovered in the home.

The GBI is investigating the shooting, spokeswoman Nelly Miles said.

 

Meanwhile, Muturi’s death has elicited a heated debate on the social media. While some say the family should bear its burden, others feel there is more to the story than meets the eye. A number of Kenyans are also demanding to see the raw footage of the shooting incident.

READ ALSO:   Shock as baby killed in US while mother is away in Kenya, father charged with murder

“Before you rush to judgement, pose and ask yourself how the man got into the car and attempted to run over the officers who were supposed to serve him with an arrest warrant,” wrote a concerned Georgia resident.

 

DANIEL MWAURA wrote the following on Facebook Monday:

I’m amazed by the deafening silence I see whenever a Kenyan get killed by police. You don’t even see a word of condolences to the grieving mother.

In 2016 a Kenyan Teenager got shot for holding a bloom and there was no outcry among the Kenyan community. This time a Kenyan got shot allegedly for drug trafficking and you didn’t see any outcry from the usual people.

I think the reason is, we are a young people in the US and haven’t learned how to deal with police brutality; when a tragedy like this happens we don’t know what to do. We either blame the ‘suspect’ or the parents who raised him up.

What if the story the police put out wasn’t true? If they went to serve him a warrant how did he end up in the car? If he was already in the car how did the police identify him as the suspect in the middle of the night? These are things we should wanna find out.

Most immigrant communities have organizations that represent their people and their needs in government and legal matters. We don’t have that as Kenyans, we are mostly united along church lines. We need to unite and have representation beyond our churches. Anyways, just my thoughts..
Daniel Mwaura, Atlanta.

 

 

READ ALSO:   PHOTOS: Kenyan woman who died in Atlanta buried

 

But Eric Mwangi wrote:

It’s not silence for lack of care but also from giving the grieving family time to get through with this difficult time.

Trust me most of us are mad and thinking just how we can help our young black boys and girls facing tough challenges in this country.

Many Leaders are now engaging and looking for ways to solve this however big or little they can.

Soon we are going to be having open and FREE workshops on HOW TO RAISE BLACk KIDS IN AMERICA… we are currently reaching out to the panel of presenters and urge each one of you with preteens and teens and even kids in their 20’s to be sure to attend and bring along your children.

Pls be on the lookout …

Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the dearly departed…. it’s time to show some solidarity for good not time to flex. Thx

 

Ole Salania I agree the police are not truthfully in this modern times. We need more information concerning what transpired and if excessive amount of force was necessary.

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Daniel Mwaura The kid who got killed in 2016 was just a skinny teenager holding a bloom, and two grown cops shot him and claimed their lives were in danger. You see, when a Kenyan get killed by a thug we know how to deal with it, we can run to the police for help. BSee More

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Mungara Nganga Very well put. It is ironic that in the land of the free,you are only one traffic stop away from the grave.especially if you are a minority/immigrant

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Daniel Mwaura If we were well united as a people, in matters such as this, we could just hire lawyers to work with the GBI to get to the bottom of what actually happened. But since we are not we just don’t wanna deal with it. We just wanna forget about it and go on with our lives.

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Esther Thairo We should have strong Community Leaders, who can be the voice of the whole Community.
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Daniel Mwaura Esther Thairo, I don’t think it’s about strong leadership, we already have that. It’s just that we don’t have a united front. When an event like this happens the first question that is asked is, “nyina athiaga kwao?” and if happens that they are not affiliated with the Kenyan churches we know, the mother is on her own. We need to unite beyond our churches.
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Daniel Mwaura replied5 Replies31 mins
Esther Thairo You are right Daniel Mwaura something drastically must be done.
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And the debate continues

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Diaspora

PHOTOS: Two Kenyan men, Kamau and Mwaura, tie the knot in US

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Two Kenyan men have said “I do” in the United States.

Benson Kamau and James Mwaura tied the knot at a gay wedding ceremony in Chicago, Illinois, this past weekend.

According to Mwakilishi.com, as US based news website, Kamau and Mwaura are both natives of Kenya.

Sam-sex marriage has been legal in Illinois since June 1, 2014 after Governor Pat Quinn signed a bill legalizing such marriages on November 20, 2013.

This is not the first time that a Kenyan man has entered into matrimonial union with another man in the US, In 2016, Mr Ben Gitau, 33, and Mr Steve Damelin got married at Ann Arbor, Michigan.

In a related development in February, 2018, a self proclaimed Kenyan Lesbian married an American woman in a low key ceremony held in Dallas, Texas, USA.

Manuella Mumbi tied the knot with her American lover,  Lisa Webb Clay.

Mumbi, one of the few Kenyan women who have boldly come out to declare that they are lesbians, was born and raised in Kahawa, Kiambu County and recently relocated to the US to live with her better half before their wedding.

Webb Clay is an American model who hails from Texas. She reportedly invited Mumbi to the US to formalize their engagement.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: What is this Kenyan lady talking about?

RELATED: Kenyan woman marries her lesbian lover in US

Last week, the Court of Appeal in Kenya granted gays and lesbians the freedom to register their own umbrella lobby.

In a judgment delivered on Friday, a majority decision of the Court of Appeal held that human beings should not be denied their fundamental rights because of how they choose to live their lives.

This position was taken by judges Philip Waki, Asike Makhandia and Martha Koome while affirming the decision of the High Court.

Here are some photos from last weekend’s ceremony:

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Why are there so few women chefs?

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It is believed that the kitchen is a woman’s place and as girls grow up cooking with their grandmothers and mothers, they carve their culinary career path from an early age.
But being amazing home cooks rarely elevates them to professional chefs.

At most high-end restaurants in Nairobi and Mombasa, there are no female executive chefs.

The InterContinental Hotel, for instance, has a male executive chef and one woman sous chef. Out of the 50 chefs at the hotel, just 18 are women. The Nairobi Serena and Tamarind Tree hotels which both have male executive chefs also have female sous chefs, who are a step below the executive chefs.

At Utalii Hotel, which has a college that trains hospitality workers, the ratio of women chefs to men is one to three, says Catherine Sidi of the food production department at the college.

This is the reality in the rest of the top hotels. Even globally, the number of male chefs awarded Michelin stars, the ultimate accolade of fine dining, outnumbers those given to women.

An executive chef leads the kitchen teams and also participates in cooking, planning menus and creating new dishes. Whereas a sous chef plans and directs food preparation in a kitchen.

READ ALSO:   Sad day as broadcaster Njoki Ndegwa of Jambo Radio passes away in Dallas, Texas

So why don’t women rise to executive chef posts?

The pressure on women to juggle work and home life is nothing new but executive chef John Getanda of the Nairobi Serena says that a top chef’s job mostly involves running through 12 to 14 hour shifts and this could be the reason why more men take up the jobs as opposed to women.

“It is not easy and most women have given up along the way despite being capable chefs. Some want to start families and do something else after a short stint in the career,” he says.

Long hours

Sous Chef Corretta Akinyi of the Hotel InterContinental says that the hours are really what makes the job tough.

“For a woman to rise, she has to work long hours and be willing to stay even after work to perfect and learn new culinary skills that is just not easy for everyone,” she says.

Chef Corretta says while there are almost as many women as men when starting out in hotels, but most female chefs either divert to other ventures or stagnant on junior levels.

“Some prefer to be pastry chefs which is a flexible job in the sense that you can prepare the pastries a day before as opposed to working in the ‘hot kitchen’ where everything is done on the same day and with so much pressure,” she says.

READ ALSO:   PHOTOS: Kenyan woman who died in Atlanta buried

When I ask Chef Getanda whether the restaurant kitchen is like what we see in famed TV series Hell’s Kitchen and if that could be the reason why the job could is tough for women, he laughed.

“No, that is not how kitchens are, and if they were, it would be a bad environment for anyone to work in, not just the women,” he says.

He adds that the industry needs to work on its representation, conditions and image to achieve a truly diverse workforce.

source:businessdaily

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US firm reveals plan to grow marijuana in Kenya

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A New York-based company is claiming to have obtained a licence to cultivate marijuana on 500 acres of land in Kenya, bringing closer home the current global debate about regulation and control of the narcotic.

In a notice, GoIP Global Inc, which is listed on the OTC Markets of New York, told its shareholders that it has secured a permit to grow the stimulant on a 500-acre plot in Kenya.

“After visiting Kenya and meeting with officials in the country, I am very excited about the prospects this agreement (licence) brings to our company. This is the first of several critical transactions that will transform GoIP into a relevant member of the burgeoning cannabis industry,” said company chairman Ike Sutton in the statement dated March 7.

“The lease term will be for 25 years and Kenya being on the Equator provides the best conditions for all-year round production,” the statement adds.

However, the Kenyan government denied issuing such a licence, warning that marijuana remains a prohibited plant in the country’s statutes. GoIP did not respond to our multiple requests for comment.

Agricultural Research Principal Secretary Hamadi Boga said he is not aware of any permit issued to GoIP Global Inc for the growing of cannabis.

READ ALSO:   REVEALED: Raila Odinga among 10 wealthiest persons in Kenya -Tuko

“I am not aware of the licensing of the said firm to grow marijuana. As you are aware, cannabis is not in the list of crops that we currently regulate,” said Prof Boga.

source:businessdaily.co.ke

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