Connect with us

Africa

VIDEO: Epic Kenyan poll ruling to be made before sunset Friday in line with Judge Maraga’s SDA faith

Published

on

Kenyans will on Friday be eagerly awaiting the verdict of the Supreme Court on whether President Uhuru Kenyatta’s win in the August 8 elections was valid.

Although they did not indicate what time they will deliver their decision, the justices, led by Chief Justice David Maraga, said they will notify lawyers and the public on the time.

But Mr Maraga, as a Seventh-day Adventist adherent and also president of the court, will ensure that the decision is made before sunset, when Sabbath starts.

Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission chairman Wafula Chebukati declared President Kenyatta winner of the election on August 11, announcing that the incumbent had garnered 8,223,163 against his closest rival Raila Odinga’s 6,822,812.

The judges can dismiss the petition altogether, meaning that President Kenyatta would be deemed duly elected, or they can declare the poll invalid, sending Kenyans back to the ballot in two months.

REJECTED VOTES

Related Content

The rejected votes will play a key role in deciding whether President Kenyatta met the threshold of 50 per cent plus one vote.

However, Mr Odinga, of the National Super Alliance, contests the win, arguing that the poll was marred by massive irregularities and inconsistencies.

READ ALSO:   Jomo Kenyatta: I 'll continue fighting for my people for as long as I live [VIDEO]

He says there were “grave inaccuracies” that were either as a result of negligence by, or the willful intention of, the IEBC.

The Nasa leader argues that the poll agency adopted “a consistent pattern of increasing” President Kenyatta’s figures but reducing his votes.

Among the issues the seven judges will be grappling with are whether there were irregularities in the poll and, if so, whether they were massive enough to annul the results.

ATTORNEY GENERAL

In his submissions in court, Attorney-General Githu Muigai said that “the threshold required to disturb the election is such that the evidence has to disclose profound irregularities in the management of the electoral process”.

Whereas President Kenyatta, through lawyers Ahmednasir Abdullahi and Fred Ngatia, says that a voter should not be punished for the mistakes of poll officials, Mr Odinga argues that the process should have been “clean”.

Mr Abdullahi said that in 99 per cent of the cases, the court can only invalidate a presidential election on the transgressions of the voter.

He added that were the petition to succeed, the court would have to find that the 15 million Kenyans who voted on August 8 do not count.

OVERTURN JUDGEMENT

The issue of rejected votes was brought back to court once again as Mr Odinga pleaded with the court to revisit the matter. During the 2013 election petition, it was argued that a ballot paper once rejected, or declared void by law, is incapable of expressing any preference for or against a candidate.

READ ALSO:   Shock as 1m dead voters likely in IEBC register, says KPMG report

The rejected vote is, therefore, invalid and cannot be introduced into the percentage-vote tallying process.

Arguing for the dismissal of this prayer, Mr Ngatia said nothing had changed to convince the court to overturn the 2013 judgment.

“Rejected votes cannot be taken into account in the final tally. It is a point we argued in 2013 and nothing has changed to make us depart from it. There should be uniformity in the judgments of the court,” Mr Ngatia said.

DISPARITIES

Another matter the judges will be grappling with is the different sets of results and disparities in votes between presidential, gubernatorial and senatorial seats

Mr Odinga, through his lawyers, submitted in court that the IEBC released five sets of rejected votes, casting doubts on the validity of the final outcome of the presidential result.

Although the electoral body termed the numbers “mere statistics”, Mr Otiende Amollo, for Nasa, said it cannot be true, arguing that the results in all the platforms should be similar.

CONSTITUTION

The judges will also be deciding whether to depart from the 2013 decision on the interpretation of the Constitution.

Nasa also claimed that scrutiny of the results forms revealed irregularities, with a number of them not bearing the commission’s stamp or watermarks, or were unsigned or missing serial marks.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: New twist as autopsy shows no physical injuries on dead Kenyan woman

In the 2013 presidential petition, the Supreme Court dismissed the case, saying the evidence brought before them failed to prove the alleged irregularities.

-nation.co.ke

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Africa

VIDEO: 10 most irritating things about Kenyans from Diaspora

Published

on

One time, a friend of mine went on a two-week tour of the USA and when she came back to Kenya, he couldn’t stop saying, “You know worr I am sayin?”

After visiting a foreign country, it’s normal to find locals adopting a tweng. Never mind, Kenyans who studied in India, Italy, Russia, Ukraine and Greece rarely return with accents that would make you mistake them for a Patel, Marco, Ivanov, Alexei or Costopoulos.

Here are 10 irritating things when Diaspora Kenyans jet home:

1. Ngai!..Am I safe?
This mohine who has lived in Dandora all his life, before getting a scholarship to study in some community church run college in Wyoming, will ask his childhood friends: “Is Buruburu safe after six?” when they ask him to join them for drinks.

2. Do you take cards?
Otieno, who grew up in Kasipul-Kabondo before he was saved by some missionaries who took him to Canada for college studies, will ask if he can swipe his Visa card at the local butchery.

3. Is that sparkling or orange water?
Seriously? How do you expect a shopkeeper in a sleepy village in Murang’a to stock sparkling water? People there drink water straight from Mathioya River and have never died of bilharzia…

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Uhuru meets British PM Theresa May in London

4. Like back in the US… my foot
Every sentence has to have a comparison of how different things are like back ‘home’ in the US of A… “This traffic… my God!… like back in the US there is nothing like this!” …”Like back in the US…things are efficient, there is service delivery… “

New York. PHOTO/FILE

5. Gas is petrol, right?
These Diaspora guys come and shortly forgot they called ‘ngata’ petrol. They call it gas and thus have to go to a gas station…  supermarkets are convenience stores. And they will ask whether you moved houses to a ‘Condo’… and when you zubaa whether they meant ‘kondoo’ they correct  that it’s ‘condominium’ back in Delaware…which is a Shagz like mid Atlantic State equivalent to Ruiru in Kenya. And by the way, nobody gives a rat’s butt what you call things in the US!

6. I can’t speak Luhya fluently
These are nincompoops who used to get the ‘disk’ for not speaking proper English or Swahili and always translated English from vernacular when talking during the Kibaki presidency. But now they proudly brag through their noses that “I only speak Luhya and Swa kidogo!”

7. Is mutura inspected?
Yes, we know Kamande the butcher handles money, and still uses the same hands to roast mutura. But we have been eating his food since we got our first jobs and nothing has ever happened…apart from an occasional stomach ache that Vodka quickly cured. But when these Diaspora charlatans come everything has cholera!

Kenyan traditional sausage (Mutura). PHOTO/FILE

8. Don’t you guys tip…
Tipping waitresses and bar maids is good. But many Kenyans who just landed from London take it a step too far. Hey will tip a waitress Sh1000 after paying a Sh1, 500 bill. They even tip gas station attendants!

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: How Nyeri governor Wahome Gakuru died in freak morning accident

9. Overnight patriots
They look for Maasai market where they buy and wear Masaai shukas and sandals everywhere. They want African things. They want to tour the Maasai Mara, yet when they lived in Pangani estate they furthest they ever went was for a “loose mbuzi thing” (read goat eating) at Ole Polos in Kajiado.

10. Polite dictators
If they have been given stuff to deliver to you, they will make sure you pick them from where they are… like when they jet at midnight, you should be there because “I don’t want luggage!” and when they go to Mombasa, they carry your stuff and you have to wait for them.

-SDE

Continue Reading

Africa

VIDEO: Raila was drunk and stunk like a skunk, says Miguna

Published

on

Deported opposition activist Miguna Miguna has opened a new war front with his political mentor, Mr Raila Odinga, accusing him of abandoning him at his greatest hour of need and allegedly presenting a “fake picture to Kenyans that he is a statesman”.

In a scathing audio message from Canada on Sunday, Mr Miguna also poked holes in the unity deal between Mr Odinga and President Uhuru Kenyatta, saying it is only a matter of time before it collapses, given the history of “shared cynicism” the two have towards the citizenry.

However, it is his outrage against Mr Odinga, who last week accused the fiery lawyer of being his own worst enemy, that is likely to stoke the political fires even more. Mr Miguna accused the former prime minister of political dictatorship and intolerance, and building “an edifice of political impunity within ODM where his word is like a fiat, or even the 10 commandments of God”.

Listen:

 

 

“He does not want a system that would encourage ability, merit and integrity to be the foundations of leadership,” said Mr Miguna, his apparent disdain for the opposition leader made worse by Mr Odinga’s assertion in London last week that he (Mr Miguna) had refused to cooperate with Immigration officials when he was deported from the country for the second time in March.

READ ALSO:   Shock as 1m dead voters likely in IEBC register, says KPMG report

REINSTATE HISCITIZENSHIP

“What did Raila do?” he posed, challenging the ODM leader to come clean on the efforts, if any, he has made to pressure the government to allow him back into the country and reinstate his citizenship.

“He talks as if he was detained with me (yet) he came to JKIA drunk as a skunk. He could not even speak. He was incoherent. He couldn’t even stand on his two feet.”

Mr Odinga did not respond to the claims, apparently on the strength of the advice of his party’s communication director, Mr Philip Etale, who cautioned him not to respond to Mr Miguna as “he is a man not worth his time”.

The self-declared general of the National Resistance Movement (NRM) said many Kenyans who support his quest for electoral and social justice still question Mr Odinga’s wisdom in abandoning his reforms crusade and joining hands with the government.

 

The “reconciliation” betrays the principles for which the NRM was established, which is to fight for electoral justice, social justice, the protection of and respect for the Constitution, respect for the rule of law, and the independence of the Judiciary, he added.

BETRAYED REFORMS

The ODM leader, according to Mr Miguna, betrayed the reforms cause, and so his ‘Building the Bridges’ initiative with the Jubilee government was “a myth that does little to address the country’s political challenges.

READ ALSO:   Another dark day for Kenya as ex-PS, Diplomat dies

“We’re not scared of them (Raila and Kenyatta) and we will confront the culture of impunity head-on,” he said.

“The myth about reconciliation is going nowhere because it is a manipulative, deceitful and fraudulent act by two individuals to save their skin. They are not visionary leaders and they must be opposed by Kenyans of goodwill.”

President Kenyatta and Mr Odinga have selected a 14-member team of advisers to oversee the implementation of their peace pact. The team is due to start its sittings in the first week of June.

ELITE-BASED LEADERSHIP

But Mr Miguna thinks that by agreeing to work with Jubilee and targeting the leadership of NRM, Mr Odinga is helping to build “a dynastic, elite-based leadership” to defeat political justice.

The fiery lawyer was accused of treason for his role in commissioning the mock swearing-in of Mr Odinga as the “people’s president” in January, and on February 6 was deported after being held incommunicado for five days. He was kicked out again in March when he tried to re-enter the country, and he says President Kenyatta and Mr Odinga should demonstrate willingness to change by allowing him back.

“If the mythical bridges mean anything, we would like to see whether the rule of law is going to be upheld, whether the Constitution is going to be adhered to strictly, and if court orders are going to be obeyed,” he said, referring to orders that he be issued with a Kenyan passport and allowed to return to the country.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Uhuru meets British PM Theresa May in London

-nation.co.ke

Continue Reading

Africa

KDF troops begin a scheduled departure from war-torn Somalia

Published

on

KDF troops begin a scheduled departure from war-torn Somalia

By ALLAN TAWAI

The Kenya Defence Forces (KDF) troops are scheduled to withdraw from Somalia in two years time.

According to timelines drawn by the United Nations Security Council, the planned withdrawal comes seven years after KDF troops entered Somalia on October 14, 2011 in pursuit of Al Shabaab terrorists who were entering Kenya at will to abduct and kill aid workers and tourists in North Eastern and Coast provinces.

If the program works as planned, by December 2020 all sixteen Forward Operating Base (FOB) occupied by KDF troops working under Amisom will be taken over by Somalia National Army (SNA) and Jubaland Security Force who are currently being mentored to take over security responsibility of their country. The FOBs include Amisom Sector II headquarters Dhobley, Afmadhow, Tabda, Fafadun, Hoosingow, Kismayo New Airport, Kismayo Old Airport, Kolbio, Buale, Badhaadhe, Beles Qoqaani and Burgavo among others.

Last year, Kenya withdrew 200 troops from Amisom as part of its share in the 1,000-man strong force in the drawdown authorized by the UN Security Council. Another 200 KDF troops are scheduled to withdrawn from Somalia by December. It is expected that the withdrawal will be escalated ahead of the 2020 deadline leaving all security responsibilities to Somalia security agencies.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: New twist as autopsy shows no physical injuries on dead Kenyan woman

The five Troop Contributing Countries (TCCs) namely Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia are bound by the UN Security Council drawdown resolution. Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Zambia are contributing police officers to Amisom. However, the Special Representative of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission ambassador Francisco Caetano says the number will be compensated by 500 Amisom police who are coming in to assist in training of Somali police officers.

According to the UN Security Council Resolution 2372 (2017) which extended Amisom’s mandate until May 31, there is an expected reduction of the troops from 21,626 to 20,626 by October 30. The Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2372 (2017) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter in which there would be a reduction of uniformed personnel but an increase of police in Somalia.

However, locals and TCC are apprehensive of the ability of SNA to hold on to territory liberated by African Union troops when they withdraw in 2020. Lack of a unified command structure for the SNA and other security forces operating in Somalia is the greatest challenge to achieving a realistic transition to and handing over of security responsibility.

 

Continue Reading
poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2018 Calendar

August 2017
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Sep »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending