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Man swears he is Kenyan MP Kanini Kega’s son, wants DNA done

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BY BMJ MURIITHI

A 21-year-old man wants a Nairobi court  to compel Kieni MP Kanini Kega to recognise him as his son.

Mr Dennis Gitahi Wanjiru says he has tried reaching the MP for assistance without success and has now filed the case  at the Children’s Court in Nairobi. It is not clear why he filed the matter at the children’s court considering his age.

GRANDMOTHER

In a sworn affidavit, Gitahi states that his mother, Florence Wanjiru, who died in 2004, had an affair with the MP.

” My mother left me under the care of my grandmother at Watuka Village in Kieni Constituency,” he deposes.

He says he had been in touch with the MP  who promised to take him through school but reneged.

“I knows the MP well and efforts to reach him have been futile, forcing me to move to court,” says Gitahi.

In the suit, Mr Gitahi seeks recognised and wants to be treated equally with Mr Kega’s other children.

He accuses the MP of abdicating his parental duties and showing lack of interest in his life.

Kanini Kega, whose real is James Mathenge, was born on 31 October 1972 in Watuka village, Kieni, Nyeri County. He is a Kenyan member of Paliament (MP) representing Kieni constituency in Nyeri county. He is a member of The National Alliance and a coalition member of Jubilee Alliance

Mathenge acquired his nickname Kanini Kega in 1998 When he first vied for the Democratic Party nominations after the death of Munene Kairu. At that time he was 26 years old. Other leaders dismissed him as “a beardless man with nothing to offer on the political table.” Over the years, the people of Kieni came to know him as Kanini Kega (young but nice) probably because he was the youngest but most noble politician in the political scene in the area.

Who is Kanini Kega?

 

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Coast KCPE star appeals for help from donors as she battles cancer

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When Kenya Certificate of Primary Education examination results were announced late last year, Mary Mutua, 14, was excited for topping her class with 415 marks.

She was the best student at Amani Primary School. Her joy was cut short when her father broke the sad news. She had cancer.

Even with swellings in her left leg and persistent pain, she was among the top public-school performers in Mombasa.

When Mary’s parents realised that their firstborn child was sick, they did not tell her, because she was about to sit the tests.

Mary was diagnosed with bone marrow cancer about three weeks before the start of the national examination.

In October, Mr Josephat Mutua, a businessman, hid all the medical files that showed his daughter was sick.

“When Dr Samson Bebora broke the news that my daughter had cancer, we cried. We later said we would face it. We had to be strong for her. I did not want my daughter to panic and that is why we never informed her,” Mr Mutua said.

Mary kept pestering her parents to reveal what was making her sick.

“She kept complaining of pain in her limb. If it happens again, I would not tell her she has cancer, especially when the national examinations are approaching,” Mr Mutua added.

On October 1, Mr Mutua and his wife took Mary to hospital for tests. The cancer results came back positive on October 30.

“I asked him to tell me the results again and again but he repeated the same thing. My leg was hurting and I could not walk. My father used to take me to school and back. I could not play with my friends,” she added.

A week after the examination, and as her condition grew worse, Mr Mutua could no longer hide the secret. He was afraid the cancer was spreading fast.

“Dad took me to the cancer centre at Coast Provincial General Hospital. I stood at the entrance and asked him why we were there.

“I thought it was only a tumour but dad put on a brave face and broke the news. I cried like I had never cried before,” Mary added.

When the KCPE exam results were announced at Star of the Sea Primary School on November 19, Mary prayed for a miracle.

And her prayers were answered on realising she had scored 415 marks out of a possible 500.

“It was a mixed feeling. I was called to Bunyore Girls High School in Vihiga but my treatment was to begin immediately,” she said.

She started treatment hoping to join secondary school in January. Unfortunately, doctors said Mary’s leg had to be amputated. The family sought more advice from other specialists.

“Dr Bebora told us to go to India for limp salvage surgery. It meant removing the bone and replacing it with a prosthesis. My family rejected amputation. Well- wishers donated money for my treatment,” she said.

“Dr Bebora counselled me. He said I would win the war against cancer since I am a fighter. The doctor, my parents and siblings have been my strength and hope.”

Armed with Sh1.9 million from well-wishers and personal savings, the girl and her father flew to India on December 5.

“We did not know it would take that long. We came back just a week ago,” she added.

In India, doctors conducted a CT scan and confirmed Mary had cancer.

“It was only in my left leg. The doctors came up with a treatment plan that included six chemotherapy sessions for 10 weeks.

But Mary kept pestering her parents to reveal what was making her sick.

‘‘Surgery would take place in the eleventh week, depending on the results of the chemotherapy,” she said.

“People who gave us the money wanted to detain my family. My wife had to sign some promissory documents to be released. We’ll settle the remaining amount later. I now have a debt of Sh400,000 and have sold everything I can,” Mr Mutua added.

Yesterday, the family was looking for a hospital to conduct a urine PH test. None of the hospitals in the coastal region does such tests.

The family now plans to take Mary to Nairobi for the test.

“I have to undergo the test every six hours in order to take my chemo medication. My urine PH has to be maintained for my kidney to be protected,” she said.

The family says chemotherapy is Sh65,000 per session.

Due to lack of the machine, doctors have advised her to drop some of the Indian medicines, however their counterparts in Indian have warned her against the move.

“The doctors from Indian warned me against such decision, they said if I use all the medicines my cancer will completely heal, I take six drugs in a day. I wish to go back to end to finalise my treatment due to lack of machines in Kenya,” she added.

She has been warned against substituting drugs.

“My bone from the knee to the hip joint was removed, I dropped out of school to seek medication in India, I am back home but there’s no treatment in Kenya, what do I do?” she asked.

source: Daily Nation

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PS Marwa sued for child support

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Labour and Social Protection Principal Secretary Nelson Marwa has been sued for child support.

A 27 year-old woman has filed a case in a Kitale court seeking to compel Mr Marwa to pay for the minor’s upkeep.

According to court documents, the woman alleges that Mr Marwa has neglected his duties after siring her one year-old daughter.

She claims the PS only settled a Ksh50,000 hospital bill after which he absconded his duties.

Marwa has refuted the claims saying he has no knowledge of the woman or the child. He also claims he has not supported the woman financially

On his part, Marwa held that he had no knowledge of the woman or the child refuting claims that he had ever supported her financially.

“At no time have I supported the plaintiff or the alleged child,” he maintained.

Both parties will have to present themselves for DNA testing and the case will be heard on April 23.

source:nairobinews

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Janet Mbugua opens up on her battle with painful prolonged menses

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Media personality Janet Mbugua has opened up on her long battle with endometriosis that made her skip work and school days.

Through a series of posts on Instagram, the former news anchor revealed that she had extremely painful menses but getting a diagnosis was such a relief.

“This was me in 2015. Ten years earlier, in 2005, I had just undergone a laparoscopy for deep ovarian endometriosis, also known as endometriomas or ovarian cysts.

“It causes the formation of cavities within the ovary that fill with blood. It had been years, literally since high school, of painful, prolonged periods that sometimes rendered me unable to go to class or to the office, especially during the first few days of my cycle.

“Finally getting a diagnosis was such a breakthrough and I was put on birth control thereafter and have had to continue using this, except for the times we were trying for a baby,” she said.

Janet Mbugua

Mbugua added that she still has to take medication during her periods and advised ladies that painful prolonged periods are not normal.

“Until today, if I don’t take my medication, I’ll struggle during my period. Endometriosis affects an estimated 1 in 10 women during their reproductive years (i.e. usually between the ages of 15 to 49), which is approximately 176 million women in the world…Let’s talk periods and most importantly, let’s talk period pain.

“Because ladies (and gents), a very painful, prolonged period is NOT normal,” she remarked.

source:ureport

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