Connect with us

Diaspora

Man deported back to Kenya moments after landing at his destination

Published

on

A Kenyan has been deported back to his country after being found to have secured his Visa through underhand methods. Francis Kimani alias ‘Yehudah Kimani’ was deported to Kenya from Israel after immigration officers from the Israeli Interior Ministry denied him entry into an Israeli airport on Monday evening.

The 31-year-old had traveled to the Jewish state for a three-week study program. The Times of Israel reports that Kimani managed to secure a visa on his second try, in time for the Conservative Yeshiva’s winter break program after first visa application was denied.

However, upon landing at Ben Gurion Airport, authorities at the passport inspection said his visa was not valid as it was fraudulently acquired and ordered he be deported. He was booked in the next flight to Ethiopia, but lost his bag in the mix.

“They just told me to go back, I feel like I’m not a human,” Kimani said from the Addis Ababa airport.

Rabbi Andy Sacks, director of the Conservative movement’s Rabbinical Assembly in Israel termed the extradition as “an act of outright racism.”

“Let’s be honest, he was not let into the country because he was black, and this is not the first time our converts from Africa have been given the run-around.”

READ ALSO:   UK police seek kin of dead Kenyan woman

Kimani is allegedly the leader of 50-member Kehilat Kasuku, a small group of families in Kenya who decided to abandon Messianic Judaism in the early 2000s. A retired judge Justin Philips had invited Kimani to study at the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusalem for a short program.

“There was no question on the visa form asking for that, and if they want that information they should ask for it. This is naked racism,” Philips said.

Kimani is a tourism graduate and hopes to one day operate a kosher safari firm in Kenya.

Mwakilishi.com

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Diaspora

VIDEO: Furious Bishop in US tells off Kenyans who go drinking alcohol at funerals

Published

on

A US-based Bishop is unhappy with some Kenyan immigrants whom he says are tarnishing the good name of the community. Bishop Dr GG Gitahi of  Kenyan American Community Church (KACC) in Marietta, Georgia, has chastized some of his compatriots for what he terms as “unacceptable habits.”

During his Sermon aptly titled “Let Us Choose,” last Sunday, Bishop Dr GG Gitahi “went after” those who carry alcohol to funerals homes and imbibe while the funeral service is going on and furiously said he wishes some of those people remained back in Kenya to “save us the embarrassment.”

“If you are one of those people, you are an embarrassment to the larger Kenyan community in the US,” he said.

Ni aibu kubwa mnatuletea hapa. Instead of people waiting to go and have their beer at home, wanaenda kwa funeral Homes na kutoa bia na kuanza kunywa. Halafu Director wa Funeral Home anasema Pastor, can’t your people have mannersTabia zingine tuache. Ndiyo sababu tunajiaibisha.”

You can watch the whole summon here courtesy of youtube/kacc:

 


READ ALSO:   VIDEO: 10 most irritating things about Kenyans from Diaspora
Continue Reading

Diaspora

VIDEO: Pomp and colour as Kenyan journalist receives coveted award in Washington DC

Published

on

It was pomp and colour in Washington DC on Thursday as Kenya’s NTV journalist Rose Wangui, the winner of the prestigious 2019 Knight International Journalism Award, received the coveted trophy.

Wangui was awarded for her bold approach in covering sensitive topics and giving a voice to the voiceless, bringing their plight, hopes and dreams to the wider audience.

Speaking at the award event, she pledged that she will carry on with her outstanding work, giving a voice to the voiceless through her unique coverage of sensitive topics such as sexual bondage of young girls in Kenya.

“Each time I tell a story, I try to ensure that every word that I write bears the hopes and dreams of those people in the villages, towns and slums who may never have the opportunity that I have to reach a bigger audience, ”stated Wangui.

Rose Wangui at the awards gala
Rose Wangui at the awards gala

The scribe challenged journalist to have an impact in the society through unique coverage.

“Journalists should strive to tell stories that change people’s perception and make society better,” added Wangui.

Her outstanding works such as beads of bondage and schools of misery have had significant impact in the country and sparked a national conversation, prompting relevant authorities and well-wishers to address the situation.

READ ALSO:   TOUGH RULES: U.S. State Department begins checking social media activity for Visa applicants

“I wanted to show viewers something they’ve never seen, something they’ve never had,” said Wangui. “I decided to focus more on human interest stories and to go to some of the most remote areas in Kenya.” Wanui revealed at a past interview.

Continue Reading

Diaspora

Suicide among Kenyan students in US reaches alarming levels

Published

on

They travel overseas to study but return not with degrees but in caskets.

Kenyan students going abroad for studies have been dying through suicide or under mysterious circumstances, which has left communities of Kenyans living in the US brainstorming on the need to hold the hands of learners who find themselves in the deep end outside their country.

Last week, the medical examiner’s office in Santa Clara, in the US state of California, confirmed that a top achiever in the 2013 national examinations lost her life through suicide.

POISONING

Norah Borus Chelagat, the fourth best student nationally in the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) examination and the best girl in Nairobi, was found dead in her room at Stanford University on June 14.

She was at that time a master’s student at the university that she had joined in September 2014.

The Santa Clara medical examiner’s office told The Stanford Daily on Monday that the suicide was probably caused by poisoning.

The Stanford Daily said Norah’s was the fourth student death announced at the facility since February.

Then there is John Omari Hassan, a 26-year-old who in July drowned mysteriously in a pond in Baltimore, Maryland. That was four months after leaving Kenya for postgraduate studies in the US.

Baltimore County fire officials said people playing on a nearby basketball court heard someone yelling from the pond and ran over to help.

READ ALSO:   UNSUNG DIASPORA HEROES: Mwakilishi, Jambonewspot, Ajabuafrica

SWIMMING

What shocked authorities was how the deceased ended up in the water as there were signs nearby warning against swimming in the pond. Hassan, who hailed from Nakuru, graduated from Kenyatta University in October 2016.

In August 2018, a Kenyan family had to seek help from well-wishers to bring back the remains of their kin who was found dead in her room in the US.

Patricia Miswa left Kenya in 2017 to pursue a master’s degree in Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota.

Her mother tried calling her but there was no response. She later called the hostel management who together with the police discovered Miswa’s lifeless body inside her room.

Before leaving for studies in the US, Miswa founded AfroElle magazine, which focused on uncelebrated women achievers.

Recently, students with Kenyan roots in the US have also lost lives in unclear circumstances.

INVESTIGATIONS

One of them is Eric Kang’ethe, a Computer Engineering student at the University of Massachusetts who died in mysterious circumstances early this month.

Kang’ethe’s body was found by police in a vehicle outside McGuirk Alumni Stadium on the evening of October 30. His death was described as “non-criminal in nature” by Mary Carey, communications director for the office of Northwestern District Attorney, which implied that the young man might have taken his life.

Massachusetts State Police said investigations surrounding his death are ongoing. According to local media, Kang’ethe was born in Nairobi and migrated with his family to the US.

READ ALSO:   APPRECIATION: Thank you Kenyans in Georgia and beyond for your help

There is also Gift Kamau, a 20-year-old student whose body was found floating in the Mississippi River on May 18.

Before the discovery, Kamau had been reported as missing by her parents. Police at the time believed she had committed suicide after a note was found.

The deaths involving young Kenyans in the US have perturbed Dr DK Gitau, a Kenyan-born resident of Atlanta, Georgia. For almost a year now, Dr Gitau has been chronicling deaths involving Kenyans.

RISING CASES

Under the theme ‘Diaspora Shattered Dreams’, Dr Gitau, a former architectural engineer-turned- community social philanthropist, not only announces the deaths but also helps in mobilising resources for funeral purposes using his vast networks in the US.

Dr Gitau called on the Kenyan community to find ways of preventing the rising cases of stress-related deaths among Kenyans living overseas.

“As a community that is increasing in numbers in America, we can’t normalise nor become numb to these escalating pre-mature deaths among our people. The starting point is, of course, to openly talk about factors that are causing stress among our people. Burying our heads in the sand and pretending that all is well won’t do it,” he told the Sunday Nation.

According to Dr Sam Oginde, a psychology professor at Neumann University in Chester, Pennsylvania, it will be easy to find a solution.
“Right now, three out of five reported deaths among Kenyans in the US are either out of domestic violence or are from stress-related suicides. The irony is, something can be done about this if only the community is ready and willing to open up and candidly discuss what is causing this,” he said.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan pastor in Atlanta set to become a Bishop

MENTAL WARFARE
“Our community is not unique. Other immigrant communities have gone through this and were able to deal with the issue because they were willing to seek solutions.”
In the psychologist’s opinion, young adults have become casualties of “mental warfare”.

“We are seeing a lot of this, especially among young college and career adults who have a family also living here in the US. Suicides and premature deaths are most rampant between the ages of 19 to 36,” he says.

In 2017, a documentary about Kenyans in the US shed light on some untold challenges Kenyans face as immigrants while living there.

Written and produced by Kaba Mbugua, the film showed many Kenyans, just like other immigrants, struggle to make ends meet. Challenges have at times led some, especially the youth, to fall into bad company, ending up in jail, in shelters for the homeless, being deported or even losing their lives.

By Chris Wamalwa, nation.co.ke.

Continue Reading


Are you looking for a Church to fellowship in Atlanta Metro Area?

poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2019 Calendar

February 2018
M T W T F S S
« Jan   Mar »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728  
satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending

error: Content is protected !!