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VIDEO: Miguna unceremoniously whisked out of Kenya

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Fiery Nasa politician Miguna Miguna has been ejected to Canada via a KLM flight, his lawyers Dr John Khaminwa, Nelson Havi and Cliff Ombeta say.

Mr Ombeta said he was informed that Mr Miguna was Tuesday evening put on a flight headed for Amsterdam then Canada.

Dr  Khaminwa, on the other hand said his client “is already out of Kenya’s airspace”.

“It is true. He was forced into a KLM flight minutes to 10pm and we gather he is headed to Canada. Such a travesty of justice,”  Khaminwa said by phone.

It is not clear what law the government used to eject him from Kenya as the Constitution guarantees him citizenship since he is Kenyan by birth.

A a senior govt official said that the Interior Ministry will give a detailed statement in the morning.

He said when Mr Miguna was arrested, the Canadian government had written to Kenya expressing concerns that their citizen was being harassed and they wanted him back.

HELD INCOMMUNICADO

Mr Miguna Tuesday narrated how he was held incommunicado for five days without access to his family or a lawyer following his arrest last Friday.

He said police officers humiliated him by locking him up in conditions “unfit for human existence.”

Mr Miguna was speaking at the Kajiado Law Courts where he was taken after his arrest last Friday on suspicion of taking part in a ceremony in which opposition chief Raila Odinga was sworn in as the people’s president on January 30.

Reports of his deportation come hours after High Court Judge Luka Kimaru barred the Director of Criminal Investigations and the Inspector General of the police from preferring any criminal charges against him.

DISOBEYED COURT ORDER

The judge had earlier ruled that the Police IG and the DCI were guilty of disobeying court orders regarding his release.

While the court in Kajiado ordered that he be presented before Justice Kimaru’s court at Milimani, Mr Miguna was not produced in the court and his lawyers stayed late within the court’s premises waiting for his release.

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He was arraigned in a court in Kajiado on Tuesday but did not plead to charges preferred against him.

Justice Kimaru had directed that police present him before court Wednesday at 11am.

KAJIADO COURT

The Kajiado magistrate had ruled that Mr Miguna be taken before Judge Kimaru in the High Court in Nairobi before 3pm Tuesday for orders on his bail terms.

He further directed that Mr Miguna appears before him on February 14 to take a plea.

This not likely to happen as the Nasa activist has now been ejected out of Kenya.

NASA SUPPORTERS RESTLESS

On Tuesday evening, Nasa supporters who had filled the Milimani courtroom were restless on whether he had been freed after Judge Kimaru ordered for his release.

The judge said he would not leave the premises until Mr Miguna was brought before him.

“I have been informed that he is in the building, so it remains that he is free,” the judge said before he walked out of the courtroom, leaving Nasa supporters shouting and demanding to see him.

CHARGE SHEET

The charge sheet against Mr Miguna alleged that he “was present and consented to the administering of an oath to Raila Amollo Odinga purporting to bind him to commit a capital offence of treason,” leading to fears among opposition supporters that the Nasa leader could also be arrested and charged with committing treason.

Following Mr Miguna’s arrest and failure to charge him in court, the Inspector-General of Police Joseph Boinnet and the Director of Criminal Investigations George Kinoti had been ordered to appear in court to explain circumstances surrounding their failure to release the Nasa activist.

Mr Miguna was arrested last Friday and on the same day High Court Judge James Wakiaga granted him a Sh50,000 bond but he was not released.

READ ALSO:   UK police seek kin of dead Kenyan woman

NASA ‘OATH’

The Directorate of Criminal Investigations then said Mr Miguna was arrested after he confessed to administering Nasa leader Raila Odinga’s ‘oath’ and for being a member of an illegal organisation – the National Resistance Movement (NRM).

Nasa said they would Monday file contempt of court charges against the government for violating orders to release Mr Miguna and to re-open three independent private television stations which were shut down on January 30, the day of the “swearing-in” of Mr Odinga as the “people’s president”.

Two TV stations – NTV and KTN News – had their signals restored on Monday evening while Royal Media Services’ Citizen TV and Inooro TV remained off air.

NARRATES ORDEAL IN POLICE CELLS

The self-proclaimed National Resistance Movement (NRM) “general” Miguna Miguna Tuesday narrated how he was held incommunicado for five days without access to his family or a lawyer.

The flamboyant opposition activist said police, who he described as crooks, humiliated him by locking him up in conditions “unfit for human existence.”
Mr Miguna, who was arrested on Friday on suspicion of taking part in a ceremony in which opposition chief Raila Odinga was sworn in as the people’s president on January 30, was addressing Magistrate Edwin Malochi at the Kajiado Law Courts.

CELLS

He asked Mr Malochi not to let police officers accompany him to the cells as he awaited the court’s ruling.

Donning a black suit and a white shirt, he asked the court to allow him to update his supporters on his ordeal as he awaited the ruling. “I do not want to go with these people,” he told the magistrate who granted his plea on condition that he remains in the dock with the officers besides him.

Present were his lawyers Koin Lompo and nominated Senator Judith Pareno who protested their client’s handling by the police.

CLENCHED FIST

In court, Mr Miguna was a picture of confidence and defiance, displaying the national resistance movement’s clenched fist symbol as he chanted: “They can’t break me. They can go to hell and back.”

READ ALSO:   President Kenyatta condoles with family of the late Prof Calestous Juma

Mr Miguna spent the weekend at Lari Police Station in Kiambu after police refused to free him despite a court order that he be freed on a cash bail of Sh50,000.

He was arrested at his Runda home, driven to Githunguri police station and transferred to Lari police station.

Mr Miguna told the packed court that from Lari, he was transferred to Industrial Area inland depot which he described “as the most humane” of all the police stations he was detained in during his five-day ordeal.

“It was only yesterday that I was given water and a toothbrush,” he said, displaying the white toothbrush.

On his arrest, he said: “They used explosives to break into my house, which is against the law. They did not even identify themselves. Had they done so, I would have opened the door for them.”

ROUGH-LOOKING OFFICERS

He said the officers looked rough and were not dressed in uniform.

“Some of them were bearded, while others had dreadlocks; in fact I thought they were Mungiki. They did not even tell me that I was under arrest; they just led me away with guns.”

His supporters cheered him on with opposition slogans “Tibim” and “Resist.”

At some point, just before the magistrate came to deliver his ruling, Mr Miguna felt his supporters were getting agitated and waved to them to maintain order.

The magistrate ruled that Mr Miguna be taken before Judge Luka Kimaru in the High Court in Nairobi before 3 pm for orders on his bail terms. He further directed that the fiery lawyer appears before him on February 14 to take a plea.

And, just as quickly as he was brought to court, officers pounced on him after the magistrate’s ruling and drove off fast in a convoy of three vehicles.

 

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Lifestyle

From troubled childhood, Kenyan-American eyes top seat in Minnesota

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Mr Boni Njenga, a Kenyan-American born in Nakuru Town, has risen from a boy with a troubled childhood to a man with an interest in an elective post in the US, come the elections on November 3.

Mr Njenga’s mother sent him to the US in 2003 to keep him away from bad peer influence after his high school education.

The single mother of six was concerned about the future of her troublesome son who attended four secondary schools.

He attended D.N Handa Secondary School in Naivasha for his Form One, moved to Coulson Secondary School in Gilgil the following year and then transferred to Kalou Secondary School in Ol Kalou for Form Two and Form Three.

He returned to D. N Handa where he sat his O’level exams.

He passed his Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) exams but his mother worried about the effects peer pressure would have on him.

“My mother was concerned about my discipline. I was giving her a difficult time due to bad influence from my peers,” he says.

“To save me from engaging in drug abuse and crime, she decided to send me to the United States of America to live with my brothers. I arrived in the US with a near-empty suitcase and $50 as pocket money.”

Today, Mr Njenga, an American citizen with a Master’s degree in Public Administration, is seeking to become the first Kenyan-American to sit as a commissioner in one of the county boards in the US.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan man buys own coffin, causes drama as he threatens to commit suicide

He will vie for a position in the Hennepin County Board of Commissioners, District 5 (Bloomington, Richfield and Eden Prairie).

“We are facing challenges like the Opioid crisis, homelessness, lack of public safety, racial disparities and tax levy increases with no accountability and transparency on spending,” he says.

Campaign focus

Mr Njenga has lived and worked in Hennepin County for the last nine years.

Being a policy analyst, he says his campaigns are focused on five key areas – creating community wealth, closing achievement gaps, children protective services, safe and affordable housing and improving the quality of life for all residents.

“We can only solve these issues with fresh and bold 21st century governance and by applying evidence-based policy making, which will enable us to curb wasteful spending in Hennepin County, keeping more money in your pocket,” he says.

“I want to advocate for the rights of all residents. Today’s challenges require more than a single approach. They require fresh ideas, action and strong advocacy.”

Mr Njenga is challenging first term incumbent Debbie Goettel, whom he acknowledges as a formidable opponent but adds that he is up to the task.

Hennepin is Minnesota’s largest county with an annual budget of $2.5 billion that is overseen by a seven-member board of commissioners.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Raila taken to task by CNN, says only 3.5M Kenyans voted

Mr Njenga criticises the county’s dismal record when it comes to contracting minority entrepreneurs and says one of his desires is to create community wealth, informed by the challenges marginalised communities face.

“Hennepin County, with its millions of dollars, spends less than one per cent in contracting the minority groups,” he says.

“I want to bring a 21st century approach to policy making,” adds Mr Njenga who has previously pushed for opportunities for marginalised groups.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Mr Njenga has been forced to run his campaigns on social media platforms.

“I reach out to voters through my Facebook page (Boni Njenga), my website (www.boninjenga.com) and Twitter account(@Boninjenga). It is not easy but the circumstances have forced us to keep social distancing.”

Experience

After moving to the US in 2003, Mr Njenga joined Minnesota State University-Mankato from where he obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and later a Master’s degree in Public Administration.

He has held supervisory and project management roles with the State before joining the private sector.

He says this background will enable him to offer ideas and innovative approaches for creating sustainable jobs and economic security.

“It will be quite an honour if residents of District 5 give me a chance to serve them and give back to the community that gave me a home and accepted me years ago.

READ ALSO:   How my husband tricked, abandoned me with our 3 kids in Kenya and returned to the US alone

“I have always had the passion for public service and politics. I value the quote by former US President J.F. Kennedy – ‘ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your county’.”

He adds, “I came here as a young confused man, unsure of what the future held for me, but through focus, hard work and mentorship by my lecturers, I can look back and thank my mother for sending me here. I know she is proud of me.

“My mother instilled in me discipline and the value of service to the people. Minnesota gave me an elite education and job experience and I have come to call it home. It will be an honour to serve Minnesota.”

Mr Njenga joins the long list of Africans seeking elective posts in Minnesota since the election of Congresswoman Ilhan Omar to the Minnesota Legislature in 2016, and to the US House of Representatives  two years later.

She is the first black person born in Africa to be elected to the US Congress and is the highest ranking elected African immigrant politician in the State.

by nation.co.ke

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Courts

Long serving US Supreme court Judge and cultural icon Ruth Ginsburg dies at 87

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US Supreme court judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the apex Court and a pioneering advocate for women’s rights, who in her ninth decade became a much younger generation’s unlikely cultural icon, died on Friday. She was 87.

RBG, as she was popularly known, died in Washington DC  Friday after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

Born on March 15, 1933, she served on the court  from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated by President Bill Clinton on June 14, 1993.

Ginsburg became the second of four female justices to be confirmed to the Court after Sandra Day O’Connor, the two others being Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both of whom are still serving in 2020.

Following O’Connor’s retirement in 2006 and until Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court.

During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, which were noted by legal observers and in popular culture. She was generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg authored notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

READ ALSO:   President Kenyatta condoles with family of the late Prof Calestous Juma

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother, one of her biggest sources of encouragement, died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University, and became a wife and mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class.

Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg entered into academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women’s rights, winning multiple arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down; she was dubbed “The Notorious R.B.G.”, a play on the name of the rapper known as “The Notorious B.I.G.“, in reference to her notable dissents.[3]

READ ALSO:   How my husband tricked, abandoned me with our 3 kids in Kenya and returned to the US alone

She died at 87 years of age on September 18, 2020, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her home.\

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ODM announces plans to reconsider its policies

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BY KEVIN KOECH

A day after ODM party leader’s son Raila Junior made controversial remarks on the conduct of ODM politicians, the party has issued a statement on the same.

Speaking on behalf of ODM, Secretary General Edwin Sifuna announced that the party has plans to reassess its policies and make changes. Mr. Sifuna acknowledged that ODM needs to review its strategy.

He also noted that the party had initiated changes in its top organs. Additionally, he said that the changes are focusing on the 2022 general elections.

“We honestly looked at ourselves and even commissioned a task force to deliberate on internal issues. The team’s report, whose recommendations we have implemented, came with some indictment,” Mr. Sifuna stated.

“We wanted the task force to indicate our problems based on the report tabled before the National Executive Council (NEC) and adopted in its entirety,” he added.

The ODM Secretary-General also said that the party disbanded its National Election Board (NEB). Additionally, they disbanded the National Disciplinary Committee after it failed to discipline rebellious Malindi MP Aisha Jumwa.

Oduor Ong’wen, ODM’s Executive Director, also pointed out that they based the philosophy of ODM on fighting for human rights and devolution.

READ ALSO:   UK police seek kin of dead Kenyan woman
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