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Drama as 80-year-old man demands divorce, share of millet and pans

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A jilted old man, 80, and wife, 79, are locked in an unusual divorce case and property wrangle that has bounced back and forth between village and sub-county authorities without resolution.
The Ugandan man, Paul Osinge, filed the case before the Akaramai village committee, seeking separation from his 79-year-old wife, who he claims has ejected him and has moved on with another fairly young man of 60 years.
The estranged couple accept they have lived peacefully for the last 18 years in Akaramai Village, Labori Sub-county, Serere District, but disagree whether it was as husband and wife.
The frail looking Osinge said his decision to seek separation from Norah Iningoi, 79, is a painful one.

“I felt a sense of both rejection and dejection as my wife has for the last two months moved on with another fairly young man,” he lamented.
But Ms Iningoi, a mother of six, with multiple grandchildren, dismisses Mr Osinge’s claims that they have been living as wife and husband.
Speaking from her home at Akaramai Village, Labori Sub-county, Ms Iningoi said: “I hosted him here since 2000 as a gesture of humility and hospitality, not as my husband. His claims of being my husband are lies. At my advanced age! Do I look like a young woman with feelings?”
But Mr Osinge, a father of five children and nine grandchildren, said he understands they have not married officially but seeks fairness in the split.

He said Ms Iningoi has stayed with him and wasted his productive years at her home.
“My going to the area village committee is to help us divide the five bags of dried potato chips, chicken we have raised together, a bag of sorghum, a bag of millet, saucepans, and one goat we equally worked for, and I will leave her home,” Mr Osinge said.
Official stuck with case

But the divorce case is stuck before the Labori Sub-county community development officer, Mr Mathias Elau, who said the case is unusual.
“I received the cries of that 80-year-old man, but I couldn’t handle the case. I referred him to his area village committee to handle,” he added.
Mr Osinge told Daily Monitor that until February, they had lived amicably as husband and wife, but his wife’s attitude suddenly changed.
“I got to learn later that in my absence there was a fairly young man in his 60s, who has been filling my space,” he said.
To his surprise, he said, he discovered it was the wife of one of his sons, who was a matchmaker for her mother-in-law.

Mr Osinge said his companion has thrown him out of their house and tossed his beddings to the kitchen to officially create room for her new love.
But Ms Iningoi said she made up her mind to kick out Mr Osinge because he was much of a liability, only eating food she toils for.
“I told him that now that you have aged, kindly look for the whereabouts of your clansmen, in case of any sickness, I may not be of help because I am also now frail,” she added.

She said this did not go well with Mr Osinge. “It’s here that he started to frame me as being in love with another man.”
Ms Iningoi said out of goodwill, she offered Mr Osinge a bag of dried potato chips, but he reportedly sold off the entire bag, and has now placed additional claims for her property before the village committee.
But Mr Samuel Okello, one of the grandsons of Mr Osinge, received the news of his grandfather’s ejection with joy.

“It is a wakeup call for him to go and resettle with his clansmen in Kyere Sub-county, Serere District, where he deserted 56 years ago.
Mr Peter Aisu, the area village chairman, together with his committee members, said their attempts to mediate a peaceful separation between the two have not yielded any fruit after Ms Iningoi refused to share any property.
“As the village committee, we looked into the contested property, and thought they would divide, but the old woman has not bought the idea,” he said, adding that they will refer the matter to the sub-county.

-monitor

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VIDEO: 10 most irritating things about Kenyans from Diaspora

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One time, a friend of mine went on a two-week tour of the USA and when she came back to Kenya, he couldn’t stop saying, “You know worr I am sayin?”

After visiting a foreign country, it’s normal to find locals adopting a tweng. Never mind, Kenyans who studied in India, Italy, Russia, Ukraine and Greece rarely return with accents that would make you mistake them for a Patel, Marco, Ivanov, Alexei or Costopoulos.

Here are 10 irritating things when Diaspora Kenyans jet home:

1. Ngai!..Am I safe?
This mohine who has lived in Dandora all his life, before getting a scholarship to study in some community church run college in Wyoming, will ask his childhood friends: “Is Buruburu safe after six?” when they ask him to join them for drinks.

2. Do you take cards?
Otieno, who grew up in Kasipul-Kabondo before he was saved by some missionaries who took him to Canada for college studies, will ask if he can swipe his Visa card at the local butchery.

3. Is that sparkling or orange water?
Seriously? How do you expect a shopkeeper in a sleepy village in Murang’a to stock sparkling water? People there drink water straight from Mathioya River and have never died of bilharzia…

4. Like back in the US… my foot
Every sentence has to have a comparison of how different things are like back ‘home’ in the US of A… “This traffic… my God!… like back in the US there is nothing like this!” …”Like back in the US…things are efficient, there is service delivery… “

New York. PHOTO/FILE

5. Gas is petrol, right?
These Diaspora guys come and shortly forgot they called ‘ngata’ petrol. They call it gas and thus have to go to a gas station…  supermarkets are convenience stores. And they will ask whether you moved houses to a ‘Condo’… and when you zubaa whether they meant ‘kondoo’ they correct  that it’s ‘condominium’ back in Delaware…which is a Shagz like mid Atlantic State equivalent to Ruiru in Kenya. And by the way, nobody gives a rat’s butt what you call things in the US!

6. I can’t speak Luhya fluently
These are nincompoops who used to get the ‘disk’ for not speaking proper English or Swahili and always translated English from vernacular when talking during the Kibaki presidency. But now they proudly brag through their noses that “I only speak Luhya and Swa kidogo!”

7. Is mutura inspected?
Yes, we know Kamande the butcher handles money, and still uses the same hands to roast mutura. But we have been eating his food since we got our first jobs and nothing has ever happened…apart from an occasional stomach ache that Vodka quickly cured. But when these Diaspora charlatans come everything has cholera!

Kenyan traditional sausage (Mutura). PHOTO/FILE

8. Don’t you guys tip…
Tipping waitresses and bar maids is good. But many Kenyans who just landed from London take it a step too far. Hey will tip a waitress Sh1000 after paying a Sh1, 500 bill. They even tip gas station attendants!

9. Overnight patriots
They look for Maasai market where they buy and wear Masaai shukas and sandals everywhere. They want African things. They want to tour the Maasai Mara, yet when they lived in Pangani estate they furthest they ever went was for a “loose mbuzi thing” (read goat eating) at Ole Polos in Kajiado.

10. Polite dictators
If they have been given stuff to deliver to you, they will make sure you pick them from where they are… like when they jet at midnight, you should be there because “I don’t want luggage!” and when they go to Mombasa, they carry your stuff and you have to wait for them.

-SDE

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VIDEO: Raila was drunk and stunk like a skunk, says Miguna

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Deported opposition activist Miguna Miguna has opened a new war front with his political mentor, Mr Raila Odinga, accusing him of abandoning him at his greatest hour of need and allegedly presenting a “fake picture to Kenyans that he is a statesman”.

In a scathing audio message from Canada on Sunday, Mr Miguna also poked holes in the unity deal between Mr Odinga and President Uhuru Kenyatta, saying it is only a matter of time before it collapses, given the history of “shared cynicism” the two have towards the citizenry.

However, it is his outrage against Mr Odinga, who last week accused the fiery lawyer of being his own worst enemy, that is likely to stoke the political fires even more. Mr Miguna accused the former prime minister of political dictatorship and intolerance, and building “an edifice of political impunity within ODM where his word is like a fiat, or even the 10 commandments of God”.

Listen:

 

 

“He does not want a system that would encourage ability, merit and integrity to be the foundations of leadership,” said Mr Miguna, his apparent disdain for the opposition leader made worse by Mr Odinga’s assertion in London last week that he (Mr Miguna) had refused to cooperate with Immigration officials when he was deported from the country for the second time in March.

REINSTATE HISCITIZENSHIP

“What did Raila do?” he posed, challenging the ODM leader to come clean on the efforts, if any, he has made to pressure the government to allow him back into the country and reinstate his citizenship.

“He talks as if he was detained with me (yet) he came to JKIA drunk as a skunk. He could not even speak. He was incoherent. He couldn’t even stand on his two feet.”

Mr Odinga did not respond to the claims, apparently on the strength of the advice of his party’s communication director, Mr Philip Etale, who cautioned him not to respond to Mr Miguna as “he is a man not worth his time”.

The self-declared general of the National Resistance Movement (NRM) said many Kenyans who support his quest for electoral and social justice still question Mr Odinga’s wisdom in abandoning his reforms crusade and joining hands with the government.

 

The “reconciliation” betrays the principles for which the NRM was established, which is to fight for electoral justice, social justice, the protection of and respect for the Constitution, respect for the rule of law, and the independence of the Judiciary, he added.

BETRAYED REFORMS

The ODM leader, according to Mr Miguna, betrayed the reforms cause, and so his ‘Building the Bridges’ initiative with the Jubilee government was “a myth that does little to address the country’s political challenges.

“We’re not scared of them (Raila and Kenyatta) and we will confront the culture of impunity head-on,” he said.

“The myth about reconciliation is going nowhere because it is a manipulative, deceitful and fraudulent act by two individuals to save their skin. They are not visionary leaders and they must be opposed by Kenyans of goodwill.”

President Kenyatta and Mr Odinga have selected a 14-member team of advisers to oversee the implementation of their peace pact. The team is due to start its sittings in the first week of June.

ELITE-BASED LEADERSHIP

But Mr Miguna thinks that by agreeing to work with Jubilee and targeting the leadership of NRM, Mr Odinga is helping to build “a dynastic, elite-based leadership” to defeat political justice.

The fiery lawyer was accused of treason for his role in commissioning the mock swearing-in of Mr Odinga as the “people’s president” in January, and on February 6 was deported after being held incommunicado for five days. He was kicked out again in March when he tried to re-enter the country, and he says President Kenyatta and Mr Odinga should demonstrate willingness to change by allowing him back.

“If the mythical bridges mean anything, we would like to see whether the rule of law is going to be upheld, whether the Constitution is going to be adhered to strictly, and if court orders are going to be obeyed,” he said, referring to orders that he be issued with a Kenyan passport and allowed to return to the country.

-nation.co.ke

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KDF troops begin a scheduled departure from war-torn Somalia

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KDF troops begin a scheduled departure from war-torn Somalia

By ALLAN TAWAI

The Kenya Defence Forces (KDF) troops are scheduled to withdraw from Somalia in two years time.

According to timelines drawn by the United Nations Security Council, the planned withdrawal comes seven years after KDF troops entered Somalia on October 14, 2011 in pursuit of Al Shabaab terrorists who were entering Kenya at will to abduct and kill aid workers and tourists in North Eastern and Coast provinces.

If the program works as planned, by December 2020 all sixteen Forward Operating Base (FOB) occupied by KDF troops working under Amisom will be taken over by Somalia National Army (SNA) and Jubaland Security Force who are currently being mentored to take over security responsibility of their country. The FOBs include Amisom Sector II headquarters Dhobley, Afmadhow, Tabda, Fafadun, Hoosingow, Kismayo New Airport, Kismayo Old Airport, Kolbio, Buale, Badhaadhe, Beles Qoqaani and Burgavo among others.

Last year, Kenya withdrew 200 troops from Amisom as part of its share in the 1,000-man strong force in the drawdown authorized by the UN Security Council. Another 200 KDF troops are scheduled to withdrawn from Somalia by December. It is expected that the withdrawal will be escalated ahead of the 2020 deadline leaving all security responsibilities to Somalia security agencies.

The five Troop Contributing Countries (TCCs) namely Burundi, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia are bound by the UN Security Council drawdown resolution. Kenya, Uganda, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Zambia are contributing police officers to Amisom. However, the Special Representative of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission ambassador Francisco Caetano says the number will be compensated by 500 Amisom police who are coming in to assist in training of Somali police officers.

According to the UN Security Council Resolution 2372 (2017) which extended Amisom’s mandate until May 31, there is an expected reduction of the troops from 21,626 to 20,626 by October 30. The Security Council unanimously adopted resolution 2372 (2017) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter in which there would be a reduction of uniformed personnel but an increase of police in Somalia.

However, locals and TCC are apprehensive of the ability of SNA to hold on to territory liberated by African Union troops when they withdraw in 2020. Lack of a unified command structure for the SNA and other security forces operating in Somalia is the greatest challenge to achieving a realistic transition to and handing over of security responsibility.

 

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