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Kenyan Couple shares pain of man’s leaking breasts

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Mercy Muthoni did not have to think too hard about Francis Gichuru’s marriage proposal. Her response was an instant yes. Mr Gichuru had already won her heart in many ways. As a professional marketer, he was instrumental to Mercy’s business, which grew exponentially thanks to his skills. Gichuru was also her spiritual mentor. The two had been friends since childhood.

They were both born in Nairobi’s Uhuru estate 52 years ago and say they developed an interest in each other from a tender age. However, Gichuru’s parents relocated to Karatina in Nyeri County and the two lost touch. After his education, Gichuru returned to Nairobi, and the relationship was reignited. After college, Gichuru found a job outside Nairobi but returned to the capital years later. During the time he was away, Mercy had a child with another man, but this did not bother Gichuru.

They even started a joint business selling auto spare parts. Know if news is factual and true. Text ‘NEWS’ to 22840 and always receive verified news updates. “We did everything together. We even gave our tithe jointly,” says Ms Muthoni. And one afternoon in 1997, Gichuru walked into her parents’ home in Jerusalem and asked her to marry him. He was 31 years old. In 2000, they tied the knot.

But the journey was rocky as the bishop at their church and Gichuru’s parents opposed the union. The bone of contention was Muthoni’s child. “The bishop could not imagine Gichuru marrying a woman who already had a child with another man. His parents also opposed our plans ,” she recalls. On July 29, Gichuru walked Muthoni down the aisle in a wedding that was boycotted by his family.

Their bishop refused to officiate their wedding. “My decision affected my relationship with my parents,” says Gichuru, now a pastor at Christ Ambassadors Tabernacle, a church he founded in Mowlem estate, Nairobi. Despite the challenges, the couple hoped to live happily thereafter. And life was good during their first year of marriage. But by the second year, worry began to set in as they had no child. People began to ask questions. “I became concerned but he told me to relax. As is the case in most African societies, where everyone thinks the woman is the problem in the case of childlessness, I was under siege,” Muthoni says. In 2002, Gichuru left for missionary work in Botswana. Some time later, the organisation he worked for called Muthoni and asked her to go and pick him because he was unwell. “We returned to Kenya in November 2004. Gichuru was no longer active, even in bed. He was sickly,” says Muthoni at their home in Mowlem.

She adds that one day in 2007, she noticed some wetness on his shirt around the chest. By that time, Gichuru had been experiencing fatigue and headaches, but they had not suspected anything serious. “He took off his shirt and I realised his breasts were swollen. I squeezed them and milk started oozing out. By this time, his libido had gone down drastically. I called a doctor who advised us to go to Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) for tests,” she says. But no doctor was able to figure out the problem. “For two years, we went from one doctor to another but none could tell us what I was suffering from,” recalls Gichuru. “I had also started gaining weight at an alarming rate. It was frustrating.” Gichuru weighs 163kg.

One evening in 2010, Gichuru was listening to a radio programme when he heard the symptoms he had been experiencing being discussed. He called the station and was given the number of the doctor they had hosted. The doctor invited him to a city hospital where at last, his condition was diagnosed. He discovered that he suffers from a rare disorder called prolactinoma. Francis Gichuru and his wife Mercy Muthoni at their home in Mowlem, Nairobi. [David Njaaga, Standard] Prolactinoma is caused by a non-cancerous tumour in the pituitary gland in the brain. The condition causes hormonal imbalances that leads to many health complications including over-production of the hormone called prolactin.

It also causes infertility as well as vision and hearing impairment. Gichuru has to keep expressing milk in the same way as a lactating mother, failing which the pain would be unbearable. His libido is completely gone. However, he has a chance of recovering his health if he can raise the Sh3 million he needs for surgery in India to remove the tumour. The couple uses about Sh10,000 per month on Gichuru’s medication. “The condition may be managed using drugs but at times, the patient must undergo surgery to remove the tumour,” says Dr Stanley Ngare, an endocrinologist at KNH. Donation towards Gichuru’s surgery can be sent to M-Pesa pay bill number 450977.
-standardmedia.co.ke

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Why Fred Matiang’i is Kenya’s Mr Fix-it

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Dr. Fred Okengo Matiang’i has been touted as the Magufuli of Kenya.

He is now flying multiple flags from CS for Interior and Coordination of National Government to the chairman of the all-powerful cabinet committee on national development and implementation. And because of his appointments to critical dockets, some now call him President Uhuru Kenyatta’s Mr. Fix-it.

When he joined cabinet in 2013 as ICT Cabinet Secretary, the little-known holder of a doctorate in literature faced off with media owners by forcing digital migration down their throats.

When he was appointed as Education CS, Matiang’i revolutionized national exams sealing all cheating loopholes despite being accused of militarising the exams.

It was then on to the powerful Interior Ministry which would bring him into an unavoidable working relationship with nearly all other ministries.

The crackdown on counterfeit goods as well as rogue road users in November last year propelling the combative cabinet member to visible heights that some say earned him a soft spot in the President’s heart.

He now chairs a Cabinet committee on implementation that will report directly to the head of state with other sub-committees chaired by Interior Principal Secretary Karanja Kibicho also Kenyatta’s ally.

In May last year, the president called on his deputy William Ruto to supervise government projects; a directive that appears to have changed overtime with Matiangi’s new cabinet committee now handed over sweeping powers to oversee all national government projects, just like a chief minister and prime minister would do in other regimes.

But despite his fast rise in Uhuru’s government, Matiang’i has also found himself on the dark side of history, after his name was dragged through the Ruaraka Land Saga over irregular compensation to businessman Francis Mburu, for land claimed to have been public land.

The deportation of lawyer Miguna Miguna is also a dark cloud hanging on Matiang’i’s back with the disregard of several court orders putting him on the spot.

Matiang’i’s loyalty to President Kenyatta has, however, put him closer to power becoming a close confidant to Kenyatta.

-Citizentv.co.ke

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“I don’t eat nyama choma, I eat a lot of veggies” ‘Duke of Kabeteshire’ Charles Njonjo turns 99

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BY OLIVIA MUNGWANA

Kenya’s Former Attorney General Charles Njonjo on Wednesday celebrated his 99th birthday.

Despite being just one year shy of the centenarian tag,, the Duke of Kabeteshire, as he is popularly known, still remains regal and enigmatic and also a celebrity.

In a previous interview, asked what keeps him young, Njonjo said he looks after himself.

I swim daily, I used to do 12 laps, now I do only seven. I also have a bicycle which I ride for 10 minutes daily, on top of the treadmill which I do for 10 minutes daily. I’m also careful about what I eat; I don’t eat nyama choma, I eat a lot of veggies,”  he told Business Daily in an interview

Njonjo, who featured prominently (and powerfully) in the post-independence politics of Kenya, was known for his “hawkish” brand of politics and is often touted as one of the wealthiest men in Kenya.

Below is an interview he did with Business Daily when he was 25 years.

To describe “Sir” Charles Njonjo as immaculate would be how the sky might attempt to describe the colour blue. It seems pointless and wasteful. But he seems to wear that adjective on his cuffs, doesn’t he?

At 95, he still remains regal and enigmatic— not to mention a celebrity; Kenya’s first Attorney-General for over 15 years, Member of Parliament for Kikuyu constituency, minister for Constitutional Affairs in the Moi government and, more recently, chairman of the East African Wildlife Society. Not to mention the prominent businessman tag.

Njonjo, who featured prominently (and powerfully) in the post-independence politics of Kenya, was known for his “hawkish” brand of politics and is often touted as one of the wealthiest men in Kenya.

In person, despite being five years shy of the centenarian tag, he refuses to be bowed by age (or man, for that matter). He remains resolute in his signature pinstripe suits and a blue checked shirt that he had on when I met him in his Westlands office. He was amusing, unapologetic, a straight-shooter, deliberate and astute.

What’s the story of that odd-looking bracelet on your wrist?

Oh this? This is an elephant bracelet. It’s a celebration and support of elephants. I wear it because I believe in the conservation of elephants. I believe we all have to save these animals for future generations.

What kind of a person were you in your prime; standing at the elbow of the bearded Jomo Kenyatta — the first Attorney-General of an independent republic, well-scrubbed in your pinstripe suit?

You know, I miss the discipline of that time. I miss the power I had, power that I could use for the common good. I miss the nation that we had then, a strong nation.

There is nothing that went on that we didn’t know about; we had the proverbial long arm of the law. We were always two steps ahead, we knew what conversation you had in your house the previous night.

What happened in Garissa recently would never have happened because we had total control of security.

What has changed over time for you, socially and politically?

What has really changed is this new Constitution that we have. It is good but at the moment, because we don’t understand it, it’s bad and it’s dangerous. It has brought a lot of misunderstanding, ambitions and greed for power.

All these governors and this paraphernalia that go with it; motorcade riders. It’s brought ugliness and pretence. The whole intention of our constitution was for government to be closer to the people. That hasn’t been the case.

Are you happy with the work of the Judiciary now?

No. (Pause) I think we have a lot of people there who are inexperienced. This is because of appointment of people who are not seasoned.

You were once a very powerful man. What did you learn about power and influence?

That you can use it and misuse it. I used it for good, I could have used it to destroy.

Did power change who you were?

No, it made me humble. Power can make you arrogant and ruthless.

How do you manage to maintain yourself like this at 95?

I look after myself. I swim daily, I used to do 12 laps, now I do only seven. I also have a bicycle which I ride for 10 minutes daily, on top of the treadmill which I do for 10 minutes daily. I’m also careful about what I eat; I don’t eat nyama choma, I eat a lot of veggies.

What is your greatest struggle in life now?

(Pause) I’m struggling about you and your Press. I get my paper at 6am and I read it until 7am and I just get depressed with what I read. Then I wonder why I bother reading this newspaper, to depress me? It’s a habit though.

Look, you have done well for yourself in life, but you still wear a suit every day and come here to work! When will you say this is enough, I won’t come to work anymore?

Maybe when I’m cremated. Otherwise I will wait until I cannot move a limb. As long as my feet can carry me, I will come here daily.

Do you think about death, do you fear dying?

No. Death is something you can face, why fear it? I don’t engage in that kind of thought and I don’t want anyone to raise money when I die… friends meeting at the cathedral… I don’t want any collection of money.

Just how much are you worth? Do you know?

I’m a poor man. I’m not worth anything.

I don’t drink much… if I’m to drink, it will be just a bottle of beer and maybe a cider, that’s it.

Ok, so you don’t drink. What’s your sin then?

My sin? (Thinks). I don’t sleep enough. I’m unable to do eight straight hours of sleep… that I regret because I’d love to have a deep sleep.

Because I’m thinking… and I’m worried… (Pause)… I’m thinking of things… you know, like what will you write about me after this? I debate with myself in bed.

What do you least like about Sir Charles Njonjo?

(Pause). I like myself… no, I really do.

Have you been a good father?

Because I have looked after my kids well, I have seen them through their education; one is a barrister, the other is a scientist and one is a veterinary doctor. They have turned out well, I think. I have given them what my father gave me, an education.

What was your limitation as a father?

(Laughs) You know, sometimes these kids argue with me, saying dad, this is not right, this isn’t supposed to be like this… my son was arguing with me last night from the UK. He doesn’t agree with what I say and I can’t force him, because that’s his position.

But him arguing or not agreeing with you isn’t your limitation, is it? What is yours?

That I can’t flog him… (chuckles)… I mean I can’t beat him up.

You would prefer to beat him up?

(Chuckle) No, I prefer to talk to him but he wasn’t listening, but in the end, I won the argument! (Laughs).

Do you have an inheritance plan in place, or will we be treated to a public circus of kids fighting for their father’s wealth when he’s long gone, like we have witnessed in the Kirima and Karume cases?

Yes, yes… we have sat together and they know what they will get and inherit. There is a will they can’t challenge and I advise our people to write wills because what we witness with the people you have mentioned is sad. If they were to come back to life today, I don’t know what they would say!

Why did you marry so late?

Because I couldn’t find a girl I could live with.

You? All those girls you must have met in Kenya and abroad? Not one single one you could live with?

All those girls [and] I couldn’t find one I could live with. It took me a long time but eventually, I found one and I married her at All Saints Cathedral… she was in the choir.

Were you looking for a choir girl?

No, she just happened to be in the choir. (Laughs).

Is Kenya worse now than it was in the 1960s?

Yes, even your shilling is worse off.

Your suits are an urban folklore. Is it true that you once had a suit that had your initials —CN — inscribed in the stripes?

Yes, I used to have that suit; bought it in London, tailored in London

That’s what I like — not a plain one like yours. (Grins)

I don’t even wear blazers, I did all this for you. Don’t you think I have tried?

Yes, you have tried but next time you come here without a tie, I will show you the door.

How many of those suits do you own?

What has been your greatest loss in life?

My greatest loss was the death of President Jomo Kenyatta. There was a man I followed and trusted and that’s the man who used to lead the country with a rungu(club) but at least we were united.

I could go to North Eastern and come back. You try and do that today, you’ll be back a corpse.

Who is your closest and most trusted friend?

Today? (Pause) I trust myself. It’s difficult to say, apart from my own family, the only man I trust is Richard Leakey. I hope he saves our wildlife with his new appointment (as chairman of the Kenya Wildlife Services). (Pause) Who is the editor of your paper?

That’s a lady… no, this is not the man who I’m thinking of who writes for you people, a nasty fellow who wrote an untrue story about my involvement in the CMC scandal.

You see, CMC Motors was a company started by Europeans to sell vehicles and the way they were doing it in those early years was that European employees used to get paid part of their salaries here and part in England to supplement their salaries and to maintain their way of life, but also to keep them interested in working here.

Some directors were being paid from overseas but your people picked that and said that was wrong. But it wasn’t only CMC that was doing it during that time. Many companies in East Africa were also doing it to maintain their European staff.

You must be referring to the audit report by Webber-Wentzel…

The audit by the South African company? (Dismissive wave). No, nothing to do with that. That money was kept in England and was done by the book. I didn’t take trouble replying to that news report, I treated it with contempt.

What is the most common question people ask you when they meet you?

They don’t ask me anything, they are usually intimidated. But you are a brave young man, asking me all these questions, I commend you for that. Thanks.

I’m not, I’m a factual man. I don’t imagine romance. I’m not going to engage in fantasies and things like that, nothing.

When you once went to Ronalo Foods in town for lunch with Raila, a cross-section of your tribesmen felt, at that time, that you were jumping in bed with the enemy, they felt betrayed…

(Long stare) Don’t Kikuyus eat ugali?… (Pause) Don’t they? Why can’t I eat ugali with Raila without it being turned into a cinema?

What are you reading now?

How do you fill your time?

I visit my coffee farm in Kiambu every evening. I also have a goat farm for milk. That occupies my time.

Where the devil lives, you don’t want to be on Facebook.

It’s a social media platform where people connect with friends and share things.

Is it a gathering of people at night? I don’t know these modern things. I don’t even know how to use a phone like this one you are using to record me… my phone only keeps numbers.

How much do you have on you right now?

What do you mean? As we speak?

Yes, in your wallet. I want to know how much a man like you walks around with in cash.

Let me check… [fishes out a wad of cash —guesstimate Sh10,000 — held together with a silver money clip].

(Laughs) Okay, this interview is over. You have enough.

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BREAKING: Legendary jazz musician Oliver Mtukudzi has died

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Veteran jazz musician Oliver Mtukudzi has died, TshisaLIVE can confirm.

Mtukudzi’s record label Gallo Records confirmed the news on Wednesday afternoon but said there were no details available.

The musician’s family is set to release a statement later this afternoon.

An outpouring of tributes has already flooded social media.

During an interview with TshisaLIVE a year ago, Mtukudzi spoke about his excitement of releasing his 67th album.

He said the most significant thing about his upcoming album, Hanya’Ga (Concern) was the message.

“My 67th album is meant to share a message of introspecting and I’m hoping people learn a thing or two from it. It’s an album I wrote last year after I realised that the world keeps getting tangled up in ‘unnecessary’ problems.

“All because we are focused on competing and being better than the next person. In so doing we keep stepping on each other’s toes but that is not how God created us. God meant for us to compliment each other, that’s why he didn’t duplicate talent,” he said at the time.

Source: www.timeslive.co.za

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