Connect with us

Diaspora

VIDEO: Exclusive interview with Miguna Miguna on JKL

Published

on

Controversial politician Miguna Miguna’s Wednesday night interview on Citizen TV’s Jeff Koinange Live show was a tough one to put it mildly; and arguably a nightmare for a fainthearted journalist.

While some viewers enjoyed the show and were electrified by Miguna’s apparent bravado in the interview, others were dissatisfied and have accused the self-declared NRM general of being dramatic and evasive in his responses.

Miguna, however, disagrees that he failed to answer any questions.

“A polite reminder to some confused Kenyans: Saying “no” to a question is also an answer. If you believe a question is malicious, just say so. You will not die,” tweeted Miguna after being interviewed from Toronto, Canada.

The 21-minute Skype interview kicked off on a high with the interviewee scolding the host and dictating the topic the interview should focus on.

“Miguna, your lawyer Cliff Ombeta received a letter on your nomination by Governor Mike Sonko as deputy governor. Have you received that letter?” Koinange fired the first question only for Miguna to rebuff it.

“Jeff I am not here to talk about Cliff Ombeta or Governor Sonko. I am here to talk about how my rights have been violated by the regime in Nairobi,” replied Miguna.

Miguna would still not clearly answer the second question on whether he would return to the country. He instead embarked on a chronological recount of what transpired before he was forcefully ejected from the country.

READ ALSO:   SAD: Death Strikes Miguna Miguna's family ahead of his return

When Koinange asked the third question – What are you doing to have yourself back to Kenya? – Miguna seized the moment to criticise the Kenyan media for what he termed as “glorification of tyranny” and blaming State agencies for his woes.

A back-and-forth would then ensue as Miguna insisted that he is a Kenyan citizen and had never lost his citizenship as claimed by the State.

When the lionhearted Koinange sought to stick out the grounds under which the State says Miguna lost his citizenship, the fiery lawyer dropped his gloves and took on the host bare knuckles.

“The problem with you is that you never went to law school, you’re not a judge or a lawyer,” Miguna fired. “Don’t interfere with me. Let me speak,” added Miguna as Koinange tried to interject.

Drama continued with Miguna embarking on a lengthy explanation of why the government does not want him in the country.

When Koinange sought to bring his mighty show to order, Miguna was not ready to be reduced to the ordinary calm interviewee.

“Jeff don’t argue with me let me answer. You are a journalist if you ask a question let me answer. You are suggesting that I help them win a case I already won in court. Is that rational?” Miguna posed when asked why he had declined to reapply for Kenyan citizenship as directed by the government.

READ ALSO:   Police seize Miguna’s car

Asked who are members of his self-styled National Resistance Movement (NRM), Miguna’s response was a bitter pill to swallow.

“Why do you want to know and you are not an NRM member. You have not asked who Jubilee members are,” said Miguna.

Koinange moved on to the next question: “If you were to come back, could you think about working with Sonko?”

“Jeff I will make announcements as to who I work with or who I don’t when I am back or when I would like to do that. Today that was not the purpose of this interview,” replied Miguna.

“But everyone wants to know,” pleaded Koinange.

Miguna responded: “ Everyone includes me. I don’t want to know what you are asking because it is not a question that Sonko or other people have asked me.”

Seemingly fed up with Miguna, Koinange asked the former Nairobi gubernatorial aspirant why he was not willing to talk about the Capital’s affairs. Miguna replied: “Jeff I will talk about Nairobi when I deem it fit. Not on compulsion from you.”

At the tail end of the interview, a light moment ensued as the take-no-prisoners Miguna finally cracked a smile saying: “Jeff I am a tough cookie, you can’t push me around.”

The interview came to an end on a near similar note as it began.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Angry Diaspora Kenyans take Uhuru head on over Miguna fiasco

“Miguna you being outside the country means nothing because you are in the outside looking in. Don’t you think you should be in the inside,” asked Koinange.

“Jeff the problem with you is that you don’t know history,” Miguna fired as he explained how Fidel Castro and other political icons were and later returned to victory.

In the words of Jeff Koinange, “Wow, what a show, what a guest!”

REACTION:

-Citizen

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Diaspora

Kenyan students in the US to lose visas if their classes move online

Published

on

Kenyan students in the United States may soon be forced to return home if their colleges or universities opt for online learning only, as the coronavirus pandemic continues.

In a statement on Monday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that students on non-immigrant F-1 and M-1 visas who attend universities that operate entirely online amid the Covid-19 pandemic may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States.

FULL ONLINE COURSES

“Students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States,” said ICE.

The agency added that F-1 students who attend schools that provide a mixture of online and in-person classes will be permitted to take some online courses.

According to ICE, the schools must certify to the Student Exchange Visitor Program “that the program is not entirely online, that the student is not taking an entirely online course load and that the student is taking the minimum number of online classes required to make normal progress in their degree.”

F-1 students whose universities will maintain full in-person classes will remain bound by federal laws that allow a maximum of one class or three credit hours online.

IMMIGRATION CONSEQUENCES

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Miguna lands in Canada, says he has not showered for 6 days

“Students who remain in the United States while taking only online courses could face immigration consequences, including the initiation of removal proceedings,” ICE said.

Last year, the number of Kenyans enrolled in US higher-education institutions rose by nearly four per cent, reaching a total of 3,451 students, according to a 2019 study published by a State Department Bureau and Institute of International Education, a New York-based NGO.

Africans overall account for 40,000 of the 1,095,000 international students in the US.

The updated guidance comes as schools in the US consider reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic, while imposing restrictions on students’ return that will force some students to stay off-campus and learn remotely for entire semesters at a time.

The ICE announcement comes at a time when the US leads the world in coronavirus caseload. More than 2.9 million Americans have contracted Covid-19 with 130,000 deaths reported.

By Nairobi News

Continue Reading

Courts

Family of Kenyan man in US accused of rape by Uber customer seeks help

Published

on

A 24-year-old Kenyan in the United States who has been accused of rape is looking for financial support to secure freedom.

The family of Kennedy Wambua Masila who resides in Corona, California is raising funds for their kin who has been held in jail since June 10, 2020, on allegations of rape.

According to the family, Mr Musila, who had just recently migrated to the US from Kenya, is a college student and was working as an Uber driver to make ends meet.

The family in a GoFundMe page, says that on the fateful night, he received a request from the Uber app to pick up a passenger. He then picked her up and dropped her off at her destination.

The woman later called the police and said that he had raped her. He was subsequently arrested and has been held in jail in lieu of Sh2 million ($20,000) bail.

“Ken drove to the pickup location where he picked up a lady who seemed to be intoxicated. Just like he always did, he drove his passenger to her destination and dropped her off. Ken has assured us that during this trip nothing happened and that it was just one of the many trips he had completed that day. He was later arrested on the aforementioned accusation,” says Dr Fastac Mutua, who is organising the fundraiser to raise the bail amount and an additional Sh1.2 million ($12,500) in legal fees.

READ ALSO:   Uhuru speaks out on Miguna Miguna’s homecoming

According to Dr Mutua, Musila was barely getting settled in the United States and was working two jobs to support his family and also going to school to secure a promising future for himself.

“He has been falsely accused and his promising future put in jeopardy,” says Kennedy’s family,” he adds.

Please donate here: GoFundMe.com

-Nairobi news

Continue Reading

Diaspora

Kenyans among foreign students likely to be deported from US if they take full-online classes in fall

Published

on

The Department of Homeland Security has issued a policy revision on foreign students studying in the United States which will lead to mass deportation of students who don’t take on-campus classes.

The department has restricted foreign students from attending classes completely online. The restrictions include the possibility of deportation. See full press release here below:

SEVP modifies temporary exemptions for nonimmigrant students taking online courses during fall 2020 semester.

WASHINGTON – The Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP) announced modifications Monday to temporary exemptions for nonimmigrant students taking online classes due to the pandemic for the fall 2020 semester. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security plans to publish the procedures and responsibilities in the Federal Register as a Temporary Final Rule.

Temporary exemptions for the fall 2020 semester include:

  1. Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States. The U.S. Department of State will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States. Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status. If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.
  2. Nonimmigrant F-1 students attending schools operating under normal in-person classes are bound by existing federal regulations. Eligible F students may take a maximum of one class or three credit hours online.
  3. Nonimmigrant F-1 students attending schools adopting a hybrid model—that is, a mixture of online and in person classes—will be allowed to take more than one class or three credit hours online. These schools must certify to SEVP, through the Form I-20, “Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status,” certifying that the program is not entirely online, that the student is not taking an entirely online course load this semester, and that the student is taking the minimum number of online classes required to make normal progress in their degree program. The above exemptions do not apply to F-1 students in English language training programs or M-1 students pursing vocational degrees, who are not permitted to enroll in any online courses.
READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Angry Diaspora Kenyans take Uhuru head on over Miguna fiasco

Schools should update their information in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) within 10 days of the change if they begin the fall semester with in-person classes but are later required to switch to only online classes, or a nonimmigrant student changes their course selections, and as a result, ends up taking an entirely online course load. Nonimmigrant students within the United States are not permitted to take a full course of study through online classes. If students find themselves in this situation, they must leave the country or take alternative steps to maintain their nonimmigrant status such as a reduced course load or appropriate medical leave.

Due to COVID-19, SEVP instituted a temporary exemption regarding online courses for the spring and summer semesters. This policy permitted nonimmigrant students to take more online courses than normally permitted by federal regulation to maintain their nonimmigrant status during the COVID-19 emergency.

F-1 nonimmigrant students pursue academic coursework and M-1 nonimmigrant students pursue vocational coursework while studying in the United States.

Continue Reading


poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2019 Calendar

May 2018
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending

error: Content is protected !!