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Who murdered magistrate’s girl?

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BY OLIVIA MUNGWANA

Nine year old Maribel Kapolon, the daughter of Caroline Kemei, a senior resident magistrate at the Githongo Law Courts was found murdered after she went missing ten days ago.

The abduction and murder of Maribel Kapolon has stunned the nation and raised questions on who would want to kill her and why. Ms Kemei is the highest ranking officer at the station, located 15km from Meru town.

Yesterday, Chief Justice David Maraga expressed “great shock” on learning of the death.

“On behalf of my family, the entire Judiciary and on my own behalf, I wish to express our deepest condolences and heartfelt sympathy to (Kemei) and the rest of the family,” he said in a statement.

“Every effort is being made to find and punish her killers. I have already talked to the Cabinet secretary for Interior and the Director of Criminal Iinvestigations and they have given me a firm assurance that everything is being done to bring them to book,” he added.

The Law Society of Kenya called for exhaustive investigations.

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Entertainment

Why I quit music to be a truck driver in the US – Nyashinski

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Back in 2016 rapper Nyashinki’s music career was at it’s peak, he quit and relocated to the USA.

Nyashinki quit and started a career a a truck driver this was when his trajectory as a member of Kleptomaniacs was on the up and up.

Together with his family, the rapper, real name Nyamari Ongegu, got a chance to relocate to Delaware, USA, despite being aware he was cutting short his career.

Speaking on his YouTube channel first episode, Nyashinski said life did not favour him while there.

“When we moved abroad, I had completely quit music. I was working back in the States as a truck driver,” he said.

“I used to drive a lorry, trying to survive.”

NyashinskiThe ‘Malaika’ hitmaker says the first two years he was in Delaware, then he moved to Michigan.

“That experience taught me a lot. Two things that were life-changing for me back then was one, when I was here, I was a star,” he said.

“People recognised me everywhere and we were doing what we loved. I moved from a place where I was known and getting a bit of favours here and there to a place where no one knows me.”

“No special treatment and you must work because you have to eat.”

Another major lesson he learned in the 10 years he was away was having people around you and conversations are very important.

“That was coupled with the fact I was used to having people around me to a lonely life of driving a truck,” he said.

“There you are alone for over 16 hours. You only stop to fuel, sleep, shower and use the bathroom. So you find yourself enjoying small conversations with people you meet for five minutes. At least it was a way from that cage.”

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He said the lines on the road even become hypnotising after a long distance and he looked at them, thinking about his life.

“I accepted that this is my life,” he said.

Nyashinki
Nyashinki

He says despite the hustles, he enjoyed living a normal life, where no one knew him. He could walk in a mall, on the roads and be normal.

The reason he came back to Kenya is after realising he was living a life that he felt he was not using his intelligence or exerting his passion and purpose.

“So back in the States, my friend told me to just go in studio and exert that pressure as a lyricist,” he said.

“I did not have to release the songs. But I found myself listening to a beat, creating a song and then wanting to perfect it and then I want people to listen. That is how I found myself back into the music world and came back home.”

Nyashinki has since been releasing hit after hit and recently, he released ‘Lucky You’ album, which he is still promoting.

by Mpasho.co.ke

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Lifestyle

Mourners call for justice as teenager is buried in Meru

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A 19-year-old Form Four leaver who was allegedly beaten to death by police was buried in Antuathama Village, Meru, on Wednesday.

Hundreds of mourners, among them boda-boda riders, held a peaceful procession in Maua town, before heading to Amung’enti Catholic Church where the requiem mass for Spencer Thuranira was held.

Local leaders led by Meru County Secretary Rufus Miriti, Meru ODM chairman Jacob Munoru and Pan-Africa Climate Justice Alliance executive director Mithika Mwenda demanded speedy investigations into the teenager’s death.

They said the youngster, who sat his KCSE examination last year and scored a grade B+, was travelling to Maua to buy medicine for his mother when the motorcycle he was riding on was flagged down by police officers. The police officers clobbered Spencer who died later.

A post-mortem conducted by Chief Government Pathologist Johansen Oduor indicated that Spencer died of head injuries.

“The police have changed from a police force to a police service. The police should courteously serve members of the public and not batter them,” said Mr Munoru.

Mr Miriti regretted that death had taken away the life of a bright young man who aspired to be an engineer.

“We are saddened by the death and want to condemn police brutality meted out on any person,” the county official said.

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Dr Mwenda said they had already lodged a complaint with the IPOA and engaged the Law Society of Kenya (LSK) in a quest to seek justice for Spencer.

He also wants the underlying issues that saw boda-boda riders in Maua town hold demonstrations over the traffic boss for two days addressed so as to end animosity between police and the riders.

“The boda-boda riders have been demonstrating in search of justice. They accuse the traffic department of extorting bribes from them. Police should be accountable. This is not the first person to be killed by police. We want the person responsible to be transferred,” said Dr Mwenda.

The requiem mass was led by Fr John Peter Gitonga of Amung’enti Parish, who called for responsibility among those in positions of power.

by nation.co.ke

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Lifestyle

You were his home nurse, not wife, court tells woman

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The High Court has annulled an alleged Gikuyu customary marriage contracted by a Murang’a businessman and his home-based healthcare giver.

Ms Loyce Wangari Ngigi wanted stake in the estate of Mr Stephen Ngigi Karwigi, who died in August 2013 leaving behind a construction firm and over 40 landed properties (property that generates income for the owner).

At the time of his death, Mr Karwigi was 78 years old and sickly.

Ms Wangari told the court she married Mr Karwigi in 2009 under the Gikuyu customary law and that he visited her parent’s home in Elburgon, Nakuru for payment of Sh30,000 in dowry.

During the 2012 visit, she said, Mr Karwigi bought and gifted her parents with two pieces of land in Nakuru.

No proper celebration

But Justice Kanyi Kimondo dismissed her claim on grounds that there was no meaningful or proper celebration of a Gikuyu customary marriage.

“There was no cohabitation with habit and repute. The relationship between the protestor and the deceased did not reach the threshold of a marriage either by custom or presumption,” the court ruled.

Justice Kimondo added that although there was no contest that Ms Wangari lived with Mr Karwigi from 2009 until he passed on, she did not provide cogent evidence to show that the relationship mutated into a marriage.

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“No reliable evidence was marshalled to show that the relationship metamorphosed into a marriage. They had no children together or any joint assets,” Justice Kimondo said.

Also, no evidence was adduced indicating that the man’s family, friends and community treated her as his wife.

Ms Wangari wanted his estate distributed equally between her and the house of Mr Karwigi’s first wife who died in March 2003.

Cohabited

Ms Wangari argued that she cohabited with Mr Karwigi as husband and wife from 2009 to 2013.

However, the court ruled she had first entered the household to give care to Mr Karwigi because he was diabetic and amputee.

Justice Kimondo said, according to the evidence before court, Mr Karwigi only visited Ms Wangari’s homestead once and the ruracio (dowry) process was never completed.

“It is possible that the deceased may have asked for the protestor’s hand in marriage in his twilight years. But I find that all the requisite stages of a Gikuyu customary marriage, including ruracio and ngurario, were not carried out in this case,” said justice Kimondo.

Further, the court stated that Ms Wangari’s witnesses in court were her blood relatives — her mother and uncle. She failed to provide an independent witness to prove the celebration of a customary marriage.

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The witnesses insisted Ms Wangari was Mr Karwigi’s wife and that “the care to the deceased when he was unwell was incidental”.

She said she lived with the manin his house in Mukuyu, Murang’a County.

Returned to mother’s home

After he died, she relocated to his land in Kiawanjugu and later returned to her mother’s home.

But her evidence and that of her mother were contradictory.

For Ms Wangari, the two plots in Elburgon were part of the dowry while her mother said they were mere gifts.

“The trouble is that the sale agreements were executed on January 21, 2011 and August 17, 2011 respectively, well before the dowry ceremony,” said Justice Kimondo.

The court also held that it was inconceivable that dowry could be paid to the bride.

“This is material since the properties were jointly owned by the mother and the daughter who was the one being betrothed,” said the judge.

In her evidence, Ms Wangari relied on the pictures of Mr Karwigi’s funeral service, the funeral programme and the village chief’s letter which listed her as one of his “survivors”.

But the man’s daughter, Faith Wangui Ngigi, told court that the funeral programme was prepared by the protestor’s friends.

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The daughter said Ms Wangari’s claim for a share of the estate was fuelled by “pure greed”.

Though Ms Wangari had changed her maiden name and adopted that of Mr Karwigi, Justice Kimondo said the change of name was not proof of a Gikuyu customary marriage.

by nation.co.ke

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