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See calf born with two heads, six legs that stunned Murang’a villagers

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A farmer in Kandara, Murang’a County witnessed a ‘strange’ birth of a calf with two heads and six legs.

The owner of the calf, Mary Wanjiru, said she had never witnessed such an incident for the over thirty years that she has been a dairy farmer.

Ms Wanjiru said the mother of the calf died after the rare birth because of heavy bleeding.

She said this was the fourth time the cow had given birth, noting that the other births were normal.

“The abnormality of this calf has provoked many questions, but we have no one to blame. This is one of God’s wonders,” she said.

Residents of Ng’araria village streamed to Ms Wanjiru’s compound to have a look at the unusual calf.

Some onlookers took photos of the calf while others were terrified and speculated that a calamity had befallen the sleepy village.

The rare incident became the main subject of discussion all though Thursday at homes, schools, churches and eateries eliciting mixed reactions from the locals.

The calf died a few hours after it was born.

nation.co.ke

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Courts

VIDEO: Meet 58 year old Kenya High Court judge Mumbi Ngugi, a true icon

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On Sunday, Prof Makau Mutua wrote an opinion piece in the Daily Nation Titled: Justice Mumbi is a judicial icon.

We couldn’t agree more.

“Justice Mumbi Ngugi is a cut above the rest. She stands tall in the temple of justice. She’s among a small cadre of judges, with justices Odunga and Joel Ngugi, who are exemplars. Unlike others, she doesn’t whine. She’s a judicial icon who puts her head down and barrels forward. Jubilee’s Uhuru Kenyatta has refused, without reason, and in defiance of the Constitution, to elevate her and the others to the Court of Appeal as recommended by the Judicial Service Commission. This is unacceptable. The Chinese say it’s the peacock that raises its head that gets shot. The state is punishing her and her unimpeachable colleagues for seeing far, like a judicial giraffe, and doing the right thing.

Let’s just take a couple of Justice Mumbi Ngugi’s rulings. She boldly pioneered the landmark ruling that governors facing corruption charges cannot exercise their gubernatorial duties for the pendency of the suit. Thanks to the ruling, Governor Ferdinand Waititu of Kiambu County was shown the door.

More recently, she has ruled that property which can’t be explained is the fruit of crime and must be forfeited. If Mr Kenyatta is serious about fighting graft, then Judge Ngugi is a foremost ally. Only lawyers and judges in corrupt cartels detest her. There’s absolutely no reason – zilch – for Mr Kenyatta to hold up her elevation to the Court of Appeal,” Prof Mutua wrote in part.

As a young girl, Grace Mumbi Ngugi heard stories of people living with albinism dying of skin cancer before their 40th birthday. Now at the age of 53, she has long conquered the fear of dying young, and has learned to live with her condition and feel comfortable in her own skin. Meet Grace Mumbi Ngugi.

She was born in Banana Hill,Kiambu. she was born with albinism, to a family of 11 siblings.[3] Justice Ngugi attended Thimbigua Primary School she passed well after gaining 35 out 36 points and was admitted to Ngandu Girls High School in Nyeri.[4] Her academic life was marked with great achievement which enabled her to pursue law degrees at reputable institutions such as the University of Nairobi and the London School of Economic and political science,University of London.[5]

 Formative years: Grace Mumbi with her fellow students at Ngandu Girls School in Nyeri, Kenya.

She was appointed a High Court judge in 2011. She is the co- founder of the Albinism Foundation of East Africa,[6] She has served in different capacities in private,public society sectors.

Hon.lady Justice Mumbi Ngugi was awarded the 2018 CB madan Award in annual ceremony organized by The platform Magazine and Strathmore Law School.[7]

My experiences with discrimination are less severe than the experiences most people with albinism have had. The circumstances I grew up in, the schools I went to and my professional training all helped make my life and experience less difficult than they would otherwise have been.

However, my life has not been smooth sailing. It has never been easy especially when a large proportion of society is avoiding you. In fact, finding jobs for people like me is almost impossible because the world is convinced we are intellectually challenged, or a bad omen, or just objects of curiosity.

When I was growing up, I was always the centre of attention in every crowd I was brave enough to appear in. When I walked into a public place, everything would come to a standstill and I would feel everyone’s eyes tearing me apart. Some voices were loud while others whispered, but they all analysed me, mostly in disparaging terms.

My mother once took me to Kenyatta National Hospital in the capital, Nairobi, to seek help for my poor eyesight, but the doctors did not even know that I could be assisted with glasses, at least to protect my eyes from the glare of the sun. It was not until I was in high school that I finally got glasses with photo chromatic lenses.

There was little information around me about albinism so I scoured every little bit of information from reading books and magazines. I learned about preventing sunburn through use of sunscreen. I didn’t see or use sunscreen until I was about 17 years of age when I discovered it in a supermarket.

Perception change

The problem lies in societal perceptions where children born with albinism are shunned, denied education and later employment opportunities, and treated as if they don’t exist. What many people don’t realise is that albinism is not painful, neither is it a disease that will kill you. It simply is a lack of the melanin pigmentation in the skin, hair and eyes, which makes us look different on the outside, but not on the inside.

I am one of the co-founders of the Albinism Foundation of East Africa, which came into being in 2008. We want to ensure the social acceptance of people with albinism. It is not fair for people with this condition to die unemployed, uneducated, unaccepted, and maimed or killed for witchcraft rituals.

The myths and misconceptions about albinism are also distressing. Some parents believe that children with albinism can ‘tan’ if they stay in the sun. This, of course, only leads to great damage to their skin. Many fathers abandon their wives when they produce children with albinism, without realising that both parents have to be carriers of albinism for a child to have that condition.

Grace Mumbi Ngugi
Grace Mumbi Ngugi

A better future

The situation may seem hopeless and depressing, but I believe the future is promising for people with albinism. We have a new Constitution that guarantees all Kenyans a right to health. I believe the Government will wake up to its responsibility soon and make sunscreen available in all hospitals for people with albinism, particularly children.

We all need support systems to see us through life, particularly when it has the kind of challenges that many of us have had to deal with. I am blessed with such a system: my family, an extended family that loves me for who I am, and a couple of great, close friends who have been a great source of strength for me.

Courtesy:

United Nations Human Rights

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Entertainment

‘They put my dead baby in a box, asked if i’d carry it home,’ Zeddy narrates

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Churchill comedienne Zeddy Zainabu has narrated how she found out that her child was stillborn after she delivered, something that shook her.

Speaking during an interview with Grace Msalame, Zeddy narrated,

‘I was expectant with my second born and everything was going on well till I felt it was time for my delivery.

I decided to go to the nearest private hospital so they referred me to Kiambu.

When I reached Kiambu hospital I was given a leso to lie down as the beds were full so I asked my husband to come pick me up and we went to Pumwani.’

Zeddy was taken to the delivery room but she was not ready for the horror that awaited her.

‘Upon reaching there I was taken directly to the delivery room.

When the baby was born, hakulia and I saw them looking at each other.

The doctor then took the baby and put him in a box and then using his foot pushed it towards the nurse.

He then asked me ‘mtabeba mwende nayo nyumbani?’

Shocked and confused Zeddy decided to ask a nurse what was happening but the nurse was so rude.

‘I asked my nurse what had happened to my baby and she responded ‘unatuuliza na wewe ndio umebeba huyu mtoto miezi tisa.

we ndio unaeza tuambia nini ilimfanyikia.

She was so rude so they never explained what happened. Upto date I never knew what transpired.

It was painful coming out of the ward with nothing.

My husband told me it was God’s plan and that we should let it go.’

After being taken back to the ward to recover Zeddy said that other mothers started treating her with suspicion.

‘I was hurt because I was put in the same ward with women who had their babies.

I would watch mothers nursing and bonding with their babies

One would be looked down upon with other mothers thinking that you would steal their babies.

If you were sitting between two mothers with babies and one wanted to go shower or to the loo they would not leave their baby with you.’

Her family would come to visit her but that did nothing to calm her sorrow.

‘My family would visit me but when I went home and that is when reality set in.

People would come asking me what gender the baby was without knowing the baby had died.

If the baby had been a boy I would have named him after my dad. I would ask God why me because my neighbour had a four month baby.

I started getting stressed so I gave out the shopping to other expectant mothers but they refused.

They said that taking the shopping might bring them bad luck and their babies might die.’

On what her lowest moment was Zeddy narrated,

‘I stayed in the house for months, My husband would go to work and he never bothered much.

It was hard to know if he was affected because he acted normal when he was at home.

There was a drunk friend of mine who would knock and demand I open the door.

He would ask me ‘Are you going to kill yourself because your child died?’

It’s then that he made me go out normally, he would even ask me to bring out my laundry we wash together.

We would go together to the market, he made me come out of my ‘cage’.

Sadly he died last year.’

Zeddy is now a proud mother of three.

By Mpasho.co.ke

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Entertainment

Blogger Edgar Obare charged with ‘sharing private documents of Natalie Tewa’

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Blogger Edgar Obare has been arraigned at Kiambu Law Courts for sharing confidential travel documents of YouTuber Natalie Wanjiru Githinji alias Natalie Tewa.

Obare was charged with the offence of unlawful disclosure of personal data contrary to section 72 (3) (b) as read with section 73 of the data protection act number 24 of 2019.

His charge sheet under OB number 39/30/07/2020 reads: “On diverse dates between July 9, 2020, and July 13, 2020, at an unknown place within the Republic of Kenya, using social media accounts, domain name, www.bnn.ke, and verified Instagram account @edgarobare, unlawfully disclosed to your followers personal data of visa belonging to Natalie Wanjiru Githinji without her consent.”

Natalie Tewa

He was arrested on Thursday, July 30, at his Kisumu home and was brought to Nairobi and then taken to Muthaiga Police Station where he was detained over the weekend.

Blogger Christian Dela, who accompanied Obare to the court kept posting on the proceedings as he urged for support for his friend.

The court adjourned at 11.00 am ahead of the 2 pm ruling. On Friday, after spending a night in police custody, the blogger expressed safety concerns calling on his supporters to help him get back his freedom.

“I am not safe and I don’t feel safe where am being held, I have struggled with getting bail but now I understand why it’s being denied. Please support #freeedgarobare,” he tweeted. Before Obare’s arrest, on July 27, Tewa posted on her Twitter account blaming people whom she did not mention for soiling her name.

She posted: “We have such a terrible culture of tearing other people down in the name of gossip. There’s already too much negativity in this world, contributing to it doesn’t improve your life or take you higher. Instead use your time wisely, because every minute of our lives counts.”

Allegations

Obare stirred debate when he linked the Youtuber to a Dubai trip by Mombasa Governor Ali Hassan Joho and Suna East MP Junet Mohamed.

The duo had travelled to Dubai to check on former PM Raila Odinga who was in the hospital after undergoing an operation.

The blogger claimed that the media personality was part of the entourage. This was after a brown handbag pictured under a coffee table the two politicians drunk their tea from went viral as Kenyans wanted to know who owned it. The blogger claimed that the YouTuber was the owner of the handbag.

However, there was no image of the television celebrity who has since denied that she was part of the entourage.

By Standard.co.ke

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