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Senator banned from ‘loitering’ near his Ivy League educated wife 

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Meru Senator Mithika Linturi and Marianne Kitany met, fell in love and got married quietly in the corridors of power. Kitany is the once powerful official in the office of the Deputy President.

But the union seems to have fallen apart five years later.

The dirt crawled out of the woodwork two weeks ago when Linturi was questioned by police after Kitany claimed her husband had threatened to kill her in a domestic brawl in their Runda home, Nairobi.

It is not clear what triggered the fight, but those aware of the case termed the reasons as serious, with Gigiri OCPD Richard Muguai saying although the Senator had not been arrested, there were issues between the couple that the police were “addressing”.

The chasm widened further on November 13, when Kitany sought and obtained restraining orders against her husband and exclusive occupation of the couple’s shared residence.

Further, Linturi has been barred from loitering near the home or areas that Kitany visits often. The restraining order stipulates that he can only contact his wife when permitted by court.

“The Senator is restrained from physically or sexually abusing or threatening to abuse the applicant, the applicant’s staff, their six children and any other person associated with the applicant,” Milimani Commercial Court senior resident magistrate Orenge ordered, adding that Kitany, on the other hand, can enter any of his residences in the company of an officer to collect her personal belongings.

How did this mature, power couple end up making war instead of love barely five years after tying the knot?

From our investigations, when Kitany started dating Linturi, she oversaw a complete makeover of the former Igembe South MP’s rural Amwamba village home on the Meru-Mikinduri-Maua highway.

She demolished the old houses and put up a magnificent new bungalow that is outstanding for its wide windows.

Linturi eventually moved from his Kileleshwa house to Kitany’s house in Runda. If indeed he who finds a wife finds a good thing, then Linturi had found a damn good thing!

The lovebirds formed Atticon Ltd, a construction company, and on March 2017, were awarded a Sh1.2 billion tender to construct three roads in Meru. Things couldn’t get any better.

READ ALSO:   Linturi: Kitany out to rip me off my property

According to our sources, the dark cloud hovering over their marriage is related to a business fallout and the death of Edith Kinanu, Linturi’s house help, in October.

The 28-year-old mother of two who hailed from Marega,Tigania East, had been their help for three years.

Kinanu died at Linturi’s rural home in Maua, Igembe South on October 5, 2018 following what her husband Wilson Mwiti termed as a short illness. She was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital around midnight due to high blood pressure.

But as their help lay dead, the couple were fighting over business and money. According to a statement to the police on October 30, Kitany claimed her differences with the senator arose after she discovered that the directorship of a firm in which she has interests had been changed and she wanted the senator and an assistant probed.

Image result for Edith Kinanu, Linturi's late house hel

Edith Kinanu, Linturi’s late house help

According to the information she gave detectives, a search at the Registrar of Companies on October 1 revealed that the firm in dispute had four directors, including Linturi.

However, by October 28, the directors had changed to only Linturi and the assistant who now had 1,100 shares, originally owned by the firm associated with Kitany. The firm owns three parcels of land worth millions of shillings in upmarket Nairobi suburbs.

“She (Kitany) told police that the three parcels of land had been charged to a local bank and that she was in the process of discharging them. She fears the senator may have wanted to have absolute control over the property,” a detective said.

Kitany has further written to the registrar of companies to reinstate the directors of the firm who were allegedly replaced.

According to sources, it is the business disagreement and their house helps’ death that inexplicably darkened their marriage and degenerated into the domestic fight, where Linturi is alleged to have drawn a pistol and threatened to shoot his wife.

Linturi, an insurance broker, was first elected a Kanu MP for Igembe South in 2007. His first wife was a teacher and daughter to a former Meru County Council chairman. He has also previously been in a relationship with a medical professional and a Somali woman.

READ ALSO:   Marianne Kitany: Estranged Senator Linturi's wife tells couples to avoid divorce at all costs

Kitany was the IT manager at Kenya Railways before joining the Ruto campaign secretariat prior to the March 4 elections. Before that, she worked in a similar position at the Energy Regulatory Commission and Hamilton Harrison & Mathews Advocates, as well as being a part-time lecturer at the Faculty of Information Technology at the Strathmore University.

Kitany studied at the Nairobi University and Columbia Business School, a business school of Columbia University in Manhattan, New York City. It is one of six Ivy League business schools, and is among the most reputable business schools in the world.

In March 2015, Kitany was accused of allegedly diverting Sh200 million to fund a campaign against then Devolution Cabinet secretary, Anne Waguru.

A report by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission tabled in the National Assembly and the Senate indicated that Kitany used Sh100 million from the Legislative and Inter-Governmental Relations Office to mobilise MPs for “the abortive campaign last July to impeach powerful Cabinet secretary Anne Waiguru”.

The claims had emanated from a confidential document forwarded to the anti-corruption agency by the Presidency on July 31, 2014.

The motion of impeachment sponsored by her husband Mithika Linturi, was later dropped after it was taken up by President Kenyatta and the Majority Leader in the National Assembly, Aden Duale.

The memo had also accused Kitany of irregularly spending another Sh100 million to renovate the Deputy President’s office.

“She has continuously purported to exercise powers and making decisions that are not related to the role of chief of staff. To this end, in flagrant breach and total disregard of laid-down government procedures, Kitany converted Sh100 million allocated to the Legislative and Inter Governmental Relations Office to a confidential vote for mobilisation of MPs,” the memo read.

The memo claimed that Kitany made the decision to renovate the office unilaterally.

“In the previous administration, the office complex seating the Deputy President was extensively renovated and refurbished by the then Prime Minister,” the memo continued.

READ ALSO:   Mystery as senator's house help dies after sharing a meal with him

“Despite this, the Chief of Staff to the Deputy President has orchestrated extensive and lavish renovations to the same office buildings. The degree of wanton opulence that these renovations have resulted in is a far cry from the government’s austerity programme and unjustifiable in terms of need or priority.”

The memo added that: “There is the lingering suspicion that the sum was heavily inflated.”

It is not the first time Kitany has found herself in the spot over corruption allegations.

The disgraced parliamentary Public Accounts Committee, then chaired by Budalang’i MP Ababu Namwamba also accused Kitany of being the chief architect in the scandal that saw the Deputy President’s office hire a private jet to fly him to various destinations in West and Central Africa at a cost of Sh100 million.

The PAC report also accused Kitany of attempting to cover up the scandal by transferring most of the employees involved in what came to be known as the “hustler’s jet” case.

Some United Republican Part (URP) politicians said Waiguru, who was on the team that created the new governance structure, awarded herself the plum Devolution position, giving her direct access to the President and considerable power across government.

Ruto is supposed to be the coordinator of government and worked through his chief of staff

Marianne Kitany who, according to multiple sources, wasn’t getting along with Waiguru.

The differences between Waiguru and Kitany date back to when both helped craft new governance structures.

Linturi said that contrary to the reports that he received over Sh100 million from the office of the Deputy President to withdraw the motion against Waiguru, the decision was reached upon consultation with legislators allied to the ruling coalition.

“It is very important that Kenyans understand that I withdrew the motion after we had discussed with my colleagues from the Jubilee Alliance,” Linturi said at the time.

“I have never been bribed or received any money for work not done,” he asserted.

Marianne Kitany

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Lifestyle

From troubled childhood, Kenyan-American eyes top seat in Minnesota

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Mr Boni Njenga, a Kenyan-American born in Nakuru Town, has risen from a boy with a troubled childhood to a man with an interest in an elective post in the US, come the elections on November 3.

Mr Njenga’s mother sent him to the US in 2003 to keep him away from bad peer influence after his high school education.

The single mother of six was concerned about the future of her troublesome son who attended four secondary schools.

He attended D.N Handa Secondary School in Naivasha for his Form One, moved to Coulson Secondary School in Gilgil the following year and then transferred to Kalou Secondary School in Ol Kalou for Form Two and Form Three.

He returned to D. N Handa where he sat his O’level exams.

He passed his Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) exams but his mother worried about the effects peer pressure would have on him.

“My mother was concerned about my discipline. I was giving her a difficult time due to bad influence from my peers,” he says.

“To save me from engaging in drug abuse and crime, she decided to send me to the United States of America to live with my brothers. I arrived in the US with a near-empty suitcase and $50 as pocket money.”

Today, Mr Njenga, an American citizen with a Master’s degree in Public Administration, is seeking to become the first Kenyan-American to sit as a commissioner in one of the county boards in the US.

READ ALSO:   Marianne Kitany: Estranged Senator Linturi's wife tells couples to avoid divorce at all costs

He will vie for a position in the Hennepin County Board of Commissioners, District 5 (Bloomington, Richfield and Eden Prairie).

“We are facing challenges like the Opioid crisis, homelessness, lack of public safety, racial disparities and tax levy increases with no accountability and transparency on spending,” he says.

Campaign focus

Mr Njenga has lived and worked in Hennepin County for the last nine years.

Being a policy analyst, he says his campaigns are focused on five key areas – creating community wealth, closing achievement gaps, children protective services, safe and affordable housing and improving the quality of life for all residents.

“We can only solve these issues with fresh and bold 21st century governance and by applying evidence-based policy making, which will enable us to curb wasteful spending in Hennepin County, keeping more money in your pocket,” he says.

“I want to advocate for the rights of all residents. Today’s challenges require more than a single approach. They require fresh ideas, action and strong advocacy.”

Mr Njenga is challenging first term incumbent Debbie Goettel, whom he acknowledges as a formidable opponent but adds that he is up to the task.

Hennepin is Minnesota’s largest county with an annual budget of $2.5 billion that is overseen by a seven-member board of commissioners.

READ ALSO:   Tense, funny moments at well- attended Meru forum

Mr Njenga criticises the county’s dismal record when it comes to contracting minority entrepreneurs and says one of his desires is to create community wealth, informed by the challenges marginalised communities face.

“Hennepin County, with its millions of dollars, spends less than one per cent in contracting the minority groups,” he says.

“I want to bring a 21st century approach to policy making,” adds Mr Njenga who has previously pushed for opportunities for marginalised groups.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Mr Njenga has been forced to run his campaigns on social media platforms.

“I reach out to voters through my Facebook page (Boni Njenga), my website (www.boninjenga.com) and Twitter account(@Boninjenga). It is not easy but the circumstances have forced us to keep social distancing.”

Experience

After moving to the US in 2003, Mr Njenga joined Minnesota State University-Mankato from where he obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and later a Master’s degree in Public Administration.

He has held supervisory and project management roles with the State before joining the private sector.

He says this background will enable him to offer ideas and innovative approaches for creating sustainable jobs and economic security.

“It will be quite an honour if residents of District 5 give me a chance to serve them and give back to the community that gave me a home and accepted me years ago.

READ ALSO:   Here’s the love poem Linturi composed for Kitany

“I have always had the passion for public service and politics. I value the quote by former US President J.F. Kennedy – ‘ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your county’.”

He adds, “I came here as a young confused man, unsure of what the future held for me, but through focus, hard work and mentorship by my lecturers, I can look back and thank my mother for sending me here. I know she is proud of me.

“My mother instilled in me discipline and the value of service to the people. Minnesota gave me an elite education and job experience and I have come to call it home. It will be an honour to serve Minnesota.”

Mr Njenga joins the long list of Africans seeking elective posts in Minnesota since the election of Congresswoman Ilhan Omar to the Minnesota Legislature in 2016, and to the US House of Representatives  two years later.

She is the first black person born in Africa to be elected to the US Congress and is the highest ranking elected African immigrant politician in the State.

by nation.co.ke

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Courts

Long serving US Supreme court Judge and cultural icon Ruth Ginsburg dies at 87

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US Supreme court judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the apex Court and a pioneering advocate for women’s rights, who in her ninth decade became a much younger generation’s unlikely cultural icon, died on Friday. She was 87.

RBG, as she was popularly known, died in Washington DC  Friday after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

Born on March 15, 1933, she served on the court  from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated by President Bill Clinton on June 14, 1993.

Ginsburg became the second of four female justices to be confirmed to the Court after Sandra Day O’Connor, the two others being Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both of whom are still serving in 2020.

Following O’Connor’s retirement in 2006 and until Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court.

During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, which were noted by legal observers and in popular culture. She was generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg authored notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

READ ALSO:   Kitany to attend Linturi’s father’s burial even as divorce case rages in court

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother, one of her biggest sources of encouragement, died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University, and became a wife and mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class.

Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg entered into academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women’s rights, winning multiple arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down; she was dubbed “The Notorious R.B.G.”, a play on the name of the rapper known as “The Notorious B.I.G.“, in reference to her notable dissents.[3]

READ ALSO:   Tense, funny moments at well- attended Meru forum

She died at 87 years of age on September 18, 2020, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her home.\

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ODM announces plans to reconsider its policies

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BY KEVIN KOECH

A day after ODM party leader’s son Raila Junior made controversial remarks on the conduct of ODM politicians, the party has issued a statement on the same.

Speaking on behalf of ODM, Secretary General Edwin Sifuna announced that the party has plans to reassess its policies and make changes. Mr. Sifuna acknowledged that ODM needs to review its strategy.

He also noted that the party had initiated changes in its top organs. Additionally, he said that the changes are focusing on the 2022 general elections.

“We honestly looked at ourselves and even commissioned a task force to deliberate on internal issues. The team’s report, whose recommendations we have implemented, came with some indictment,” Mr. Sifuna stated.

“We wanted the task force to indicate our problems based on the report tabled before the National Executive Council (NEC) and adopted in its entirety,” he added.

The ODM Secretary-General also said that the party disbanded its National Election Board (NEB). Additionally, they disbanded the National Disciplinary Committee after it failed to discipline rebellious Malindi MP Aisha Jumwa.

Oduor Ong’wen, ODM’s Executive Director, also pointed out that they based the philosophy of ODM on fighting for human rights and devolution.

READ ALSO:   Linturi: Kitany out to rip me off my property
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