Connect with us

News

Senator banned from ‘loitering’ near his Ivy League educated wife 

Published

on

Meru Senator Mithika Linturi and Marianne Kitany met, fell in love and got married quietly in the corridors of power. Kitany is the once powerful official in the office of the Deputy President.

But the union seems to have fallen apart five years later.

The dirt crawled out of the woodwork two weeks ago when Linturi was questioned by police after Kitany claimed her husband had threatened to kill her in a domestic brawl in their Runda home, Nairobi.

It is not clear what triggered the fight, but those aware of the case termed the reasons as serious, with Gigiri OCPD Richard Muguai saying although the Senator had not been arrested, there were issues between the couple that the police were “addressing”.

The chasm widened further on November 13, when Kitany sought and obtained restraining orders against her husband and exclusive occupation of the couple’s shared residence.

Further, Linturi has been barred from loitering near the home or areas that Kitany visits often. The restraining order stipulates that he can only contact his wife when permitted by court.

“The Senator is restrained from physically or sexually abusing or threatening to abuse the applicant, the applicant’s staff, their six children and any other person associated with the applicant,” Milimani Commercial Court senior resident magistrate Orenge ordered, adding that Kitany, on the other hand, can enter any of his residences in the company of an officer to collect her personal belongings.

How did this mature, power couple end up making war instead of love barely five years after tying the knot?

From our investigations, when Kitany started dating Linturi, she oversaw a complete makeover of the former Igembe South MP’s rural Amwamba village home on the Meru-Mikinduri-Maua highway.

She demolished the old houses and put up a magnificent new bungalow that is outstanding for its wide windows.

Linturi eventually moved from his Kileleshwa house to Kitany’s house in Runda. If indeed he who finds a wife finds a good thing, then Linturi had found a damn good thing!

The lovebirds formed Atticon Ltd, a construction company, and on March 2017, were awarded a Sh1.2 billion tender to construct three roads in Meru. Things couldn’t get any better.

READ ALSO:   The man I loved is a fraudster, says Kitany of Linturi

According to our sources, the dark cloud hovering over their marriage is related to a business fallout and the death of Edith Kinanu, Linturi’s house help, in October.

The 28-year-old mother of two who hailed from Marega,Tigania East, had been their help for three years.

Kinanu died at Linturi’s rural home in Maua, Igembe South on October 5, 2018 following what her husband Wilson Mwiti termed as a short illness. She was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital around midnight due to high blood pressure.

But as their help lay dead, the couple were fighting over business and money. According to a statement to the police on October 30, Kitany claimed her differences with the senator arose after she discovered that the directorship of a firm in which she has interests had been changed and she wanted the senator and an assistant probed.

Image result for Edith Kinanu, Linturi's late house hel

Edith Kinanu, Linturi’s late house help

According to the information she gave detectives, a search at the Registrar of Companies on October 1 revealed that the firm in dispute had four directors, including Linturi.

However, by October 28, the directors had changed to only Linturi and the assistant who now had 1,100 shares, originally owned by the firm associated with Kitany. The firm owns three parcels of land worth millions of shillings in upmarket Nairobi suburbs.

“She (Kitany) told police that the three parcels of land had been charged to a local bank and that she was in the process of discharging them. She fears the senator may have wanted to have absolute control over the property,” a detective said.

Kitany has further written to the registrar of companies to reinstate the directors of the firm who were allegedly replaced.

According to sources, it is the business disagreement and their house helps’ death that inexplicably darkened their marriage and degenerated into the domestic fight, where Linturi is alleged to have drawn a pistol and threatened to shoot his wife.

Linturi, an insurance broker, was first elected a Kanu MP for Igembe South in 2007. His first wife was a teacher and daughter to a former Meru County Council chairman. He has also previously been in a relationship with a medical professional and a Somali woman.

READ ALSO:   Here’s the love poem Linturi composed for Kitany

Kitany was the IT manager at Kenya Railways before joining the Ruto campaign secretariat prior to the March 4 elections. Before that, she worked in a similar position at the Energy Regulatory Commission and Hamilton Harrison & Mathews Advocates, as well as being a part-time lecturer at the Faculty of Information Technology at the Strathmore University.

Kitany studied at the Nairobi University and Columbia Business School, a business school of Columbia University in Manhattan, New York City. It is one of six Ivy League business schools, and is among the most reputable business schools in the world.

In March 2015, Kitany was accused of allegedly diverting Sh200 million to fund a campaign against then Devolution Cabinet secretary, Anne Waguru.

A report by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission tabled in the National Assembly and the Senate indicated that Kitany used Sh100 million from the Legislative and Inter-Governmental Relations Office to mobilise MPs for “the abortive campaign last July to impeach powerful Cabinet secretary Anne Waiguru”.

The claims had emanated from a confidential document forwarded to the anti-corruption agency by the Presidency on July 31, 2014.

The motion of impeachment sponsored by her husband Mithika Linturi, was later dropped after it was taken up by President Kenyatta and the Majority Leader in the National Assembly, Aden Duale.

The memo had also accused Kitany of irregularly spending another Sh100 million to renovate the Deputy President’s office.

“She has continuously purported to exercise powers and making decisions that are not related to the role of chief of staff. To this end, in flagrant breach and total disregard of laid-down government procedures, Kitany converted Sh100 million allocated to the Legislative and Inter Governmental Relations Office to a confidential vote for mobilisation of MPs,” the memo read.

The memo claimed that Kitany made the decision to renovate the office unilaterally.

“In the previous administration, the office complex seating the Deputy President was extensively renovated and refurbished by the then Prime Minister,” the memo continued.

READ ALSO:   Tense, funny moments at well- attended Meru forum

“Despite this, the Chief of Staff to the Deputy President has orchestrated extensive and lavish renovations to the same office buildings. The degree of wanton opulence that these renovations have resulted in is a far cry from the government’s austerity programme and unjustifiable in terms of need or priority.”

The memo added that: “There is the lingering suspicion that the sum was heavily inflated.”

It is not the first time Kitany has found herself in the spot over corruption allegations.

The disgraced parliamentary Public Accounts Committee, then chaired by Budalang’i MP Ababu Namwamba also accused Kitany of being the chief architect in the scandal that saw the Deputy President’s office hire a private jet to fly him to various destinations in West and Central Africa at a cost of Sh100 million.

The PAC report also accused Kitany of attempting to cover up the scandal by transferring most of the employees involved in what came to be known as the “hustler’s jet” case.

Some United Republican Part (URP) politicians said Waiguru, who was on the team that created the new governance structure, awarded herself the plum Devolution position, giving her direct access to the President and considerable power across government.

Ruto is supposed to be the coordinator of government and worked through his chief of staff

Marianne Kitany who, according to multiple sources, wasn’t getting along with Waiguru.

The differences between Waiguru and Kitany date back to when both helped craft new governance structures.

Linturi said that contrary to the reports that he received over Sh100 million from the office of the Deputy President to withdraw the motion against Waiguru, the decision was reached upon consultation with legislators allied to the ruling coalition.

“It is very important that Kenyans understand that I withdrew the motion after we had discussed with my colleagues from the Jubilee Alliance,” Linturi said at the time.

“I have never been bribed or received any money for work not done,” he asserted.

Marianne Kitany

SDE

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Edison

    August 22, 2019 at 8:21 pm

    The DCI and the ant-corruption agency should get ready to deal with these two thieves who have decided to wash their dirty linen In public. They have been plundering the public coffers all along and bragging with own money and fighting over it .Both Kitany and linturi have been embezzling public funds with help of the DP.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

When the deal is just too good … How Urithi members paid millions for air

Published

on

Urithi, a housing co-operative that has marketed itself as the best bet for those who cannot afford mortgages, has sold air to unsuspecting Kenyans, killing their dreams of becoming homeowners.

In yet another property scandal, more than 32,000 members of the co-operative are counting their losses.

Those who had taken bank loans to finance their purchases are dealing with double losses, given that they have nothing to show for the money.The losses run into billions of shillings, Urithi having run out of lies to feed its investors.

Some have waited for more than eight years, and are coming to terms with the fact that they have lost their investment.

Its directors, who live large and drive posh cars, ride roughshod over investors and have no time even for direct media inquiries, preferring to use police to silence protesters rather than face their customers and offer solutions.

Urithi chairman, Samuel Maina, in the most recent status update, dated June 2, said the co-operative had profiled every project to give clear timelines and deliverables.

“Over 30 land projects are in good progress and their title deeds shall be delivered in a few months. We have set up a robust communication desk to contact each of the members based on their obligations or payment status,” he said.

Mr Maina said those who understand the Urithi socio-economic model, understand that “each project is independently based on its timelines, region or structure”.

“Each should be addressed as such, without mixing issues,” he added.

Urithi is accused of collecting money from members to buy land, which it used as collateral for loans. Some of the land is now facing auction.

Potential investors were drawn to the projects by enticing adverts, well-planned trips to view the land, with mega ground breaking ceremonies and artistic impressions of what their future homes would look like.

Some were taken to Malindi more than fives years ago, accommodated in a posh hotel and then driven 20 kilometres to be shown the land that they were buying.

Urithi then asked for fencing and title processing money, but after being paid, the sales agents dis-appeared and blocked customers’ calls.

READ ALSO:   Linturi asks court to throw out Marianne Kitany's divorce case

The promise was that they would own the homes within a relatively short time and the payment schedules only sweetened the deal.So they trooped in their thou-sands to join the co-operative. Now they are in tears as they realise that they were duped into buying air. Most agents who sold properties on behalf of the co-operative have also vanished.

The clients are now lining up at the Directorate of Criminal Investigations (DCI) to lodge complaints. For more than two weeks, the Nation has tried to get the company and its agents to talk. Last Friday, Chairman Maina did not pick our calls.

1qBut he sent a text message: “Hello, thanks for inquiring. I will call you once I am free to talk.” He has not communicated.

We asked him what had led to the flood of complaints from distressed members, and what had caused the latest problems.

Simon Gathai

When Mr Simon Gathai invested Sh1.95 million on land within the Nairobi metropolitan, he knew that was what he wanted.

Even though it was covered with coffee bushes, the sales talk that accompanied the artistic impressions of what the estate would look like when completed were enough to convince him to buy it.

“I was told that roads would be constructed, a perimeter wall and common areas for residents,” he told the Nation. He took a bank loan to pay the entire Sh1.95 million for an eighth of an acre plot at Ruiru Ridges in April, 2018.

After paying, Mr Gathai knew it was just a matter of time before he would have land to build his home.

“But ever since, we are still waiting for our titles. They have just been telling us to wait. The whole project seems to be a sham,” offers a disappointed Mr Gathai.

“I have tried approaching the management to be shown my plot so that I can uproot the coffee bushes and develop it but I have not been successful,” he adds.He says the co-operative has been reluctant to call status meetings, fearing members will know each other and mobilise themselves, which would work against its interests.

READ ALSO:   Here’s the love poem Linturi composed for Kitany

Meanwhile, Mr Gathai continues to service the loan he took to pay for the land, which pains him.

Benear Shapaya

In 2016, Mr Benear Shapaya attended a ground-breaking ceremony for the co-operative’s housing projects. He was trying to weigh his options on where to invest, especially in property.After the sumptuous meal and flowery speeches on how the co-operative would walk with members to see them own their own homes, Mr Shapaya decided to invest in one of their projects.

In August that year, he secured a Sh1 million bank loan, which he used to book a two-bedroom unit in Joska-OTG Phase 2.

The property’s full cost was Sh1.6 million.He was promised that the project would be completed in two years, and so he proceeded to pay monthly instalments. However, as months turned into years, there was nothing to show for his money.“I don’t even know where the property I bought is. I have tried finding out from Urithi offices but nobody seems to know. It seems I paid money for a project that does not exist,” he says.

When he saw things were not turning out as he expected, in May last year, he wrote to the co-operative, saying he wanted to withdraw his membership and seek reimbursement of the money he paid.

“That was after I made my last payment and went on the ground, only to find there was nothing to show for the money I had paid. I realised we had been duped,” he told the Nation.

He had invested Sh1.4 million and had completed servicing the Sh1 million loan.

‘They do not seem to be interested in finishing the project. Whenever they say they are doing something, it’s just some cosmetic kind of thing,” he says.He now wants his money re-funded after realising it was not a genuine deal. Jane Maina

What motivated Jane Maina to join Urithi was the desire to own a home, and the fact that she worked in Mombasa and did not have the time to supervise the construction of a house.

READ ALSO:   Tense, funny moments at well- attended Meru forum

She considered buying a housing the easier option. In 2016, she joined the co-operative’s OTG-Joska and Juja-Gem projects, where she thought she hoped to own three houses. By the end of 2017, she had completed payments for the OTG project, which cost Sh1.6 million.

During the Annual General Meeting AGM in 2018, Ms Maina says, Urithi Chairman Maina promised members of the project that all the units would be completed by November that year and their houses would be handed to them. That has not happened to date.Ms Main has paid Urithi Sh4.37 million.

She regrets having sold a plot on Thika Road to invest in the project.

Susan Nyaga

Before Susan Nyaga’s husband died, they decided to acquire a house to avoid paying rent.

And she came across the Urithi adverts in late 2016. Since her husband was working in Somalia, she secured a Sh1 million bank loan for the down payment.

She would pay the remaining Sh600,000 in instalments.

Unfortunately, she lost her husband in January 2017 when she was still struggling to settle the balance, as well as service the loan.

“At the time, I was under a lot of stress, having lost my husband. But the co-operative kept asking me to complete my payments while the bank was pushing me to service their loan,” she says.

So she took another bank loan to repay the first one and pay Urithi what she still owed. All the while the co-op promises that the houses would be handed over to the owners by March 2017. But March came and went, without any communication from Urithi.

In April, she visited the site and found out what was happening. It was then that she realised, to her shock, that the house she had been told was almost complete did not even exist.

Meanwhile, the bank from which she had taken the second loan was on her neck. She sold a car and a plot to repay the bank.

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

How ‘broke’ city folk get food from villages

Published

on

Every Sunday, 62-year-old Jenifer Oloo travels from her Yala home to Usenge beach in Bondo to purchase omena and fish, which she prepares, packs and sends to Nairobi.

For the last three months, she has become a regular customer of a local bus company plying the Nairobi route.

The recipient of her package is her 27-year-old son, who is a mechanic in Kariobangi.

“I have the fish dried and then package it as a parcel, which I deliver through the bus company,” she tells the Nation.

Her son has been unable to fend for himself due to the effects of Covid-19, she says. He also can’t get out of Nairobi due to the lockdown announced by President Uhuru Kenyatta to contain the spread of the deadly disease.

“Jobs are hard to come by. My son says he hardly goes to work at the garage, where he has been eking out a living for the past two years,” Mrs Oloo said at her Yala home.

The coronavirus pandemic has left many families struggling to put a meal on the table.For many city dwellers, with reduced and even no income at all following the lockdown imposed on Nairobi and Mombasa, they have been left at the mercy of their friends and relatives back in the villages.

READ ALSO:   Tense, funny moments at well- attended Meru forum

Sweet potatoesFrom omena, smoked fish and dried meat to mushrooms, cereals, bananas, sweet and irish potatoes, relatives and friends have come in handy, ensuring a steady supply of food to city dwellers.

The Nation has established that, driven by demand, most PSV bus and shuttle companies moved to delivering cargo and parcels after the lockdown.In Siaya, a manager with one of the transport companies said they deliver cereals most of the time.

In Vihiga, Mr Daniel Mugo, a transport agent at Mudete who receives the goods on behalf of bus companies, said this has been the main business for the fi rms since the travel ban.

Mr Mugo said most shuttle companies removed seats from their fleet and converted them into freight transporters after they got permits from the government to ferry consumables.They charge Sh500 to ferry a 90kg-bag and between Sh350 and Sh400 for a bag weighing 50kg.In Mumias, transport companies revealed that omena tops the list of foodstuff being sent to city dwellers.

Mr Steve Orina, the branch manager, Easy Coach Bus Company, said bags of omena are registered at their office daily for transportation to Nairobi. Each consignment is charged according to its weight.

“For a 10-kilogramme package, we charge roughly Sh600,” Mr Orina said.

READ ALSO:   Here’s the love poem Linturi composed for Kitany

Ms Rosemary Omina, whose two sons stay in Nairobi’s Huruma Estate, says she sends them two kilos of omena and about 40 kilos of maize fl our every week.

In Kisumu, transport companies are charging between Sh400 to Sh1,200 for food deliveries, depending on the weight, size and type of commodity being transported.

Free transportIn Kakamega, an official at the Blueline offices told the Nation they were delivering packages containing cereals, sweet potatoes and indigenous vegetables to families in Nairobi. Dried mushrooms top the list.

In Kisii, most of those asking for food help from upcountry are those who have lost their jobs, yet can’t return home owing to travel restrictions. We found Ms Mary Obisa sending bananas to her siblings in Kitengela.

In South Mugirango, MP Silva-nus Osoro provides free freight services to enable his constituents send food to their relatives.Deliveries are made at the con-stituency offi ces in Nyamarambe every Friday.

The MP said the arrangement will continue until the pandemic is over.In Bomet and Kericho counties, residents are using trucks to dispatch food to their families in Nairobi and the coastal region.A few of the families are also utilising courier services, including G4S and Wells Fargo.

By Daily Nation

Continue Reading

Business

Kenyans in Diaspora now can fly into and out of Kenya from August 1st

Published

on

BY OLIVIA MUNGWANA

Kenyans who have been stuck outside the country can now fly into their motherland from the beginning of next month, President Uhuru Kenyatta has said.

On Monday, Kenyatta announced the resumption of international travel into and out of the country as part of “phased reopening” of the economy, as well as the lifting of internal travel restrictions.

The move comes as pressure mounts to kickstart the country’s ailing economy after nearly four months of coronavirus restrictions that have devastated key industries such as tourism.

Kenyatta said in a televised address that “international air travel into and out of the territory of Kenya shall resume effective 1 August 2020.”

Kenya, like many other countries has been grappling with the agony and uncertainty brought about by the Coronavirus pandemic.

“Local air travel to resume on Wednesday, July 15 in strict conformity with the guidelines of Ministries of Health and Transport,” the president announced, adding that international travel will resume on August 1, 2020.

“We have not yet met the irreducible minimums 100 per cent. However, we have reached a reasonable level of preparedness across our counties,” Uhuru said.

He added that the eased restrictions were conditional and that the nation would revert to lockdown if health trend signals a worsening of the pandemic.

READ ALSO:   Marianne: Linturi seduced me when DP Ruto sent me to convince him to drop impeachment motion on Waiguru

A cautious president Kenyatta said the patterns of the disease would be studied for the next 21 days.

“Places of worship will be opened in three weeks to 100 people for services that are not more than one hour and shall not include congregants under the age of 13 years or above the age of 58 years or persons with underlying conditions,” he said.

This is whilst, Sunday schools and Madrasas will remain closed.

“Restrictions on gathering in weddings, bars and political gatherings have been extended for 30 days. I remain alive to the socio-economic challenges facing our country. History has taught us that Covid-19 is not the first economic disaster, there were many more before it,” Uhuru said.

“Jobs have been lost, businesses have closed and livelihoods endangered,” he added.

He went on: “It is not enough for the government to pump resources into the economy using stimulus instruments, as we have done.  Such efforts will go to waste if the people do not co-create solutions with the government.””We must remember that the coronavirus is invisible. We can only evade it by engaging the invisible army.”

Uhuru said that the country had to contain the infections and the number of deaths before all the Covid-19 restrictions were lifted.

READ ALSO:   MESSY DIVORCE: Kaitany says Linturi denied her conjugal rights –VIDEO

“To open up the economy, the infections must be contained and the number of deaths must be headed downward but this is not the case.”

Continue Reading


poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2019 Calendar

November 2018
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  
satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending

error: Content is protected !!