Connect with us

Africa

Addis air crash: Not a single body for burial

Published

on

Hope of finding closure for families of those who died in the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash appeared uncertain following reports that it will be difficult to match remains to DNA samples.

According to the authorities, it could take months for analysts to match the body parts recovered from the crash scene to DNA samples family members will provide.

Yesterday, the Ethiopian authorities kept a tight lid on information on the recovery process.

Senior Kenyan officials, including Transport PS Esther Koimett left Ethiopia last night, in the clearest indication yet that there is no-end in sight into investigations into the crash whose reverberations have left permanent scars on hundreds of families.

With the information blackout, family members have been left to their own devices in Addis Ababa – the Ethiopian capital where information flow remains slow and scarce, exacerbating the pain of already distressed relatives.

Relatives of one of the victims, Mama Sahra Hassan, for instance, camped at the Kenyan Embassy help desk.

Her son, Khalid Abdikadir Mohamed shared his frustration over the slow release of information on his mother and brother.“We are here hoping that we would have a clear indication of where matters stand but we cannot even get a confirmation if we will be taken to the accident scene,” said Mohamed.

READ ALSO:   Anchor Dan Mwangi apologizes for 'rude gestures' on Ethiopia crash

About 20 of his relatives had travelled from South Africa, with the hope of seeing and perhaps carrying home the remains of their loved ones for burial.

Yesterday, they, like many other families, camped at the Ethiopian Airlines-owned Skylight Hotel near Bole International Airport.

Mohamed’s younger brother and father broke down in the middle of a press interview, an indication of pain and frustration.

The long wait to bury their kin clashes with their religious belief that requires prompt burial of the dead.Islam requires one to be interred within 24 hours.

Judaism – the Jewish religion, gives 72-hour window which expires on Thursday morning.Opher Dach, a senior diplomat working in the Israeli Embassy in Addis, was frustrated.While he did not lose any immediate family member in the crash, the fact that Ethiopian authorities had not released to his team remains of two Israelis on the ill-fated flight, frustrated him a lot.

Mr Dach shared the pain of failing to live up to the Judaism teachings on treating the dead, unable to comprehend that there would be no remains to take back home after all.“We are here to help find our people, among the others, so that we can bury them according to our religion,” Dach said.

READ ALSO:   There are no bones, not even a skull — Father of Ethiopian Airlines pilot speaks

He protested that air crash investigators from his country had not been granted access to the hangar where the debris of the crashed debris are kept.

An Israeli search and rescue organisation that includes priests, known as Rabbi, had unsuccessfully tried to find any body parts belonging to Jews, despite their despatch hours after the Sunday morning crash.

A requiem mass is scheduled for Thursday morning in Addis Ababa, a largely Christian community to celebrate lives of the victims.

A visit by the affected families was also scheduled for yesterday, but it did not happen with hopes that it might have been pushed forward to accommodate the families that had not arrived.

Free flights and accommodation are available to family members of those who perished in the crash.

But as the investigations into the crash entered a crucial stage with the arrival of engineers from plane manufacturer, Boeing and US National Transport Safety Board, it was clear that answers may not be forthcoming in at least a month – according to people previously involved in such probes.

And as it would appear, it may have been a lot worse for Kenya, if the Sunday air crash happened any other day of the week.

While this may do nothing to console the tens of families who lost their loved ones – all on connecting flights to Nairobi, typical journeys originating from the Ethiopian capital have many more Kenyans on board.

READ ALSO:   NARROW ESCAPE: Greek man arrived two minutes late for the flight, escaped death in Ethiopia crash

Addis Ababa is a second home for the huge Kenyan population including diplomatic corps who regularly shuttle to Nairobi and back – for work and family.

As the harsh reality of deaths start sinking in, Ijera village, the site of the crash, will have a huge new meaning.

It is likely to be the final resting place for the lost souls. Officially, a decision is yet to be taken on how to handle the remains of the victims.

Images from the accident scene show metallic parts of the plane and personal effects were shredded to bits.Accounts of witnesses say it all – a white bolt to the ground, a bang then dust. One engine broke apart on impact and caught fire.

Source:standard.co.ke

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Africa

Kenyans are the most generous people

Published

on

Despite the erupting cases of corruption, news of murders and updates of hopelessness that litter social media pages, Kenyans remain the happiest people in East Africa.

According to the 2019 survey released by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network on Wednesday, Kenya outperformed East African nations when parameters of happiness were measured using global standards.T

he report that was released to mark the World Happiness Day bases its ranking on six key variables: gross domestic product per capita, social support, healthy life expectancy, freedom to make life choices, generosity and freedom from corruption.

This year’s focus was on how community affects happiness, how it has been changing over the years, and how information technology, governance and social norms influence communities.

Social systems

The chief researcher John Helliwell had an explanation for what makes countries like Kenya happy despite the many sad events that dominate their news.

“What stands out about the happiest and most well connected societies is their resilience and ability to deal with bad things,” said Helliwell.

Interesting to note from the survey is that social systems in Kenya seem to be crumbling. Compared to the 2018 report, more Kenyans responded in negative when asked: “If you were in trouble, do you have relatives or friends you can count on to help you whenever you need them?”

READ ALSO:   There are no bones, not even a skull — Father of Ethiopian Airlines pilot speaks

source:standard.co.ke

 

Continue Reading

Africa

PHOTOS: Uhuru all smiles in Namibia as drought crisis persists in Kenya

Published

on

President Uhuru Kenyatta led a high-powered delegation to attend Namibia’s independence day celebrations, despite the raging drought crisis in the country.

Pictures shared on the State House social media accounts show the head of state and those on his entourage all smiles during the celebrations that were held at the Independence Stadium in Windhoek.

President Uhuru Kenyatta arrives at the Independence Stadium in Windhoek to Namibia’s independence day celebrations. PHOTO | COURTESY

“President @UKenyatta arrives at the Independence Stadium in Windhoek to join the people of Namibia for celebrations to mark 29 years of their country’s independence,” read the caption.

Some of those in his delegation included his daughter Ngina, personal assistant Jomo Gecaga, ministers Monica Juma (Foreign Affairs), James Macharia (Transport) and Mwangi Kiunjuri (Agriculture), among others.

President Uhuru Kenyatta is welcomed at the Independence Stadium in Windhoek to Namibia’s independence day celebrations. PHOTO | COURTESY

At least 10 people have been reported dead as a result of the drought that has hit a number of counties.

The worst-hit are Baringo, Turkana and West Pokot.

Senior government officials, including Deputy President William Ruto, Interior CS Fred Matiang’i and his Devolution counterpart Eugene Wamalwa have, however, claimed that no Kenyan has died from starvation. They say the situation is under control.

READ ALSO:   Anchor Dan Mwangi apologizes for 'rude gestures' on Ethiopia crash

SOURCE: Nairobi News

Continue Reading

Africa

Zambia High Commissioner dies while receiving treatment in Nairobi

Published

on

Zambia High Commissioner to Kenya, Her Excellency Brenda Muntemba-Sichilembe has died.

The 49-year old High Commissioner has been receiving treatment since she was involved in a fatal road accident at Machakos on February 26.

Foreign PS Macharia Kamau has confirmed the death.

Ms Muntemba-Sichilembe was initially admitted at the Machakos Level 5 Hospital, and then flown to Nairobi and operated on to stem internal bleeding where she was admitted in Intensive care unit (ICU).

Prior to her appointment to this role, she served as Chief Program Officer at UNESCO in Zambia.

More to follow…

READ ALSO:   Boeing 737 is forced to make an emergency landing at New Jersey's Newark airport after smoke fills cargo hold
Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!