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Addis air crash: Not a single body for burial

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Hope of finding closure for families of those who died in the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash appeared uncertain following reports that it will be difficult to match remains to DNA samples.

According to the authorities, it could take months for analysts to match the body parts recovered from the crash scene to DNA samples family members will provide.

Yesterday, the Ethiopian authorities kept a tight lid on information on the recovery process.

Senior Kenyan officials, including Transport PS Esther Koimett left Ethiopia last night, in the clearest indication yet that there is no-end in sight into investigations into the crash whose reverberations have left permanent scars on hundreds of families.

With the information blackout, family members have been left to their own devices in Addis Ababa – the Ethiopian capital where information flow remains slow and scarce, exacerbating the pain of already distressed relatives.

Relatives of one of the victims, Mama Sahra Hassan, for instance, camped at the Kenyan Embassy help desk.

Her son, Khalid Abdikadir Mohamed shared his frustration over the slow release of information on his mother and brother.“We are here hoping that we would have a clear indication of where matters stand but we cannot even get a confirmation if we will be taken to the accident scene,” said Mohamed.

READ ALSO:   BREAKING: Ethiopian plane crash report out

About 20 of his relatives had travelled from South Africa, with the hope of seeing and perhaps carrying home the remains of their loved ones for burial.

Yesterday, they, like many other families, camped at the Ethiopian Airlines-owned Skylight Hotel near Bole International Airport.

Mohamed’s younger brother and father broke down in the middle of a press interview, an indication of pain and frustration.

The long wait to bury their kin clashes with their religious belief that requires prompt burial of the dead.Islam requires one to be interred within 24 hours.

Judaism – the Jewish religion, gives 72-hour window which expires on Thursday morning.Opher Dach, a senior diplomat working in the Israeli Embassy in Addis, was frustrated.While he did not lose any immediate family member in the crash, the fact that Ethiopian authorities had not released to his team remains of two Israelis on the ill-fated flight, frustrated him a lot.

Mr Dach shared the pain of failing to live up to the Judaism teachings on treating the dead, unable to comprehend that there would be no remains to take back home after all.“We are here to help find our people, among the others, so that we can bury them according to our religion,” Dach said.

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He protested that air crash investigators from his country had not been granted access to the hangar where the debris of the crashed debris are kept.

An Israeli search and rescue organisation that includes priests, known as Rabbi, had unsuccessfully tried to find any body parts belonging to Jews, despite their despatch hours after the Sunday morning crash.

A requiem mass is scheduled for Thursday morning in Addis Ababa, a largely Christian community to celebrate lives of the victims.

A visit by the affected families was also scheduled for yesterday, but it did not happen with hopes that it might have been pushed forward to accommodate the families that had not arrived.

Free flights and accommodation are available to family members of those who perished in the crash.

But as the investigations into the crash entered a crucial stage with the arrival of engineers from plane manufacturer, Boeing and US National Transport Safety Board, it was clear that answers may not be forthcoming in at least a month – according to people previously involved in such probes.

And as it would appear, it may have been a lot worse for Kenya, if the Sunday air crash happened any other day of the week.

While this may do nothing to console the tens of families who lost their loved ones – all on connecting flights to Nairobi, typical journeys originating from the Ethiopian capital have many more Kenyans on board.

READ ALSO:   NARROW ESCAPE: Greek man arrived two minutes late for the flight, escaped death in Ethiopia crash

Addis Ababa is a second home for the huge Kenyan population including diplomatic corps who regularly shuttle to Nairobi and back – for work and family.

As the harsh reality of deaths start sinking in, Ijera village, the site of the crash, will have a huge new meaning.

It is likely to be the final resting place for the lost souls. Officially, a decision is yet to be taken on how to handle the remains of the victims.

Images from the accident scene show metallic parts of the plane and personal effects were shredded to bits.Accounts of witnesses say it all – a white bolt to the ground, a bang then dust. One engine broke apart on impact and caught fire.

Source:standard.co.ke

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Africa

Plane with 17 passengers on board crashes in DRC

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A passenger plane with about 17 passengers on board crashed on Sunday in the city of Goma in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, killing several people, the provincial governor’s office said.

The plane, operated by the local company Busy Bee, crashed during takeoff for a flight to the city of Beni, North Kivu Governor Carly Nzanzu Kasivita’s office said in a statement.

The number of fatalities was not yet clear.Busy Bee was not available for comment.Air accidents are relatively frequent in Congo because of lax safety standards and poor maintenance. \All Congolese commercial carriers, including Busy Bee, are banned from operating in the European Union.

A cargo plane departing from the same airport crashed an hour after take-off in October, killing all eight passengers.

By Standard

READ ALSO:   There are no bones, not even a skull — Father of Ethiopian Airlines pilot speaks
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Africa

Why school kept news of student’s family members’ death a secret for 22 days

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A school in Tanzania decided not to inform a 16-year-old girl that her entire family of five had been wiped out by flash floods last month to enable her complete her examinations.

Anna Zambi’s parents and siblings were on their way to visit her in school for prayer day ahead of her final secondary school examinations when they met their death.

TRAGIC INCIDENT

A private car in which they were travelling in was swept away in floods following incessant rains in Handeni District, Tanga Region.

According Tanzanian daily, The Citizen, the school chose to keep the tragic incident a secret to enable Zambi complete her exams in peace.

The incident happened just two days before the start of the examinations.

The head teacher of Mother Teresa of Calcuta Girls Secondary School revealed how he managed to ensure the student was kept in the dark over the tragedy that took the lives of her parents and three other siblings on October 26.

GRAVEYARDS

In breaking communication at the school, he said, all students were no longer allowed to watch TV on the pretext that it was examination time and that they must always be busy with their books.

On Monday, almost a month after the incident, she traveled back home to be with her family after finishing the exams, only to learn that her parents and siblings were no more.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Man who lost five family members in Ethiopian crash reveals wife’s last words to him

It was not until Saturday, November 16, when a wave of grief and deep sorrow rolled through relatives and mourners who had gathered for hours to receive Zambi and take her to the graveyards of her parents and three siblings.

At the same time, the Tanzanian government has pledged to support the bereaved teenager, saying that it would pay for her psychological rehabilitation and education.

By NN

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Africa

Invitation to the African Girls Hope Foundation Annual Gala happening this Saturday in Atlanta

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BY BEN KAROMO

African Girls Hope Foundation (AGHF) annual Gala is happening this Saturday at the Kenyan American Community Church in Marietta, Georgia, USA. AGHF  is a non-profit founded by Grace Faraja, a former refugee from the 1990s civil war that ravaged the DRC. She started the foundation to help educate girls in rural Congo caught in the ongoing civil unrest, poverty and disease.

As a former beneficiary of a full scholarship that changed her life, Grace believes providing an education to orphaned and less privileged girls can open a world of opportunities to them and help then end the cycle of poverty and early marriages.

This year, AGHF’s aim is to provide full-year scholarships to 120 girls at a cost of $29 per month per girl. We are seeking your help to raise funds to meet the overall goal of $34,000 for the year 2019-2020.

We ask you to help us meet this goal by donating on our website at https://africangirlshopefoundation.com/.

We prayerfully desire to support the education of 120 girls in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Kenya. With hope that God will open doors to other African countries in the near future. We have partnered with a local pastor running a school in the village of Mulenge in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Man who lost five family members in Ethiopian crash reveals wife’s last words to him

Our partner has identified numerous girls in the village who are orphans of father and mother. Girls selected as AGHF beneficiaries are 65% of orphans of both parents.

Atlanta residents, please join us for our Annual Fundraising Gala dinner, to be held on November 9th at the Kenyan American Community Church KICC in Marietta, Georgia. Dinner and parking will be provided.

Below are some of the girls who need our help:

 

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