Connect with us

News

Five family members burnt beyond recognition by villagers over witchcraft allegations

Published

on

Residents of Nyang’ao village in Rongo, Migori County, yesterday woke up to the shocking killing of five family members over witchcraft allegations.

The five – two women and three children – were burnt beyond recognition when angry villagers torched their houses on Thursday night.

Trouble started when one Mr Joel Awuonda was attacked with machetes following a protracted family squabble. In December last year, the suspected attacker, identified as a Mr Omondi, was jailed for 12 years by the Rongo magistrate’s court.

The residents allege that last week, Mr Elijah Dwallo, the father of the convict, threatened to have Mr Awuonda killed for causing the imprisonment of his son.

On Thursday evening, villagers said Mr Awuonda suddenly became ill. A traditional healer told them the “ailment” was caused by Mr Dwallo’s family. “Awuonda was writhing in pain. Villagers took him to Dwallo’s family to be cured, but they refused. He later died,” said Ms Mary Atieno, a neighbour.

Mr Dwallo’s mother, Ms Maritha Amollo, 80, was accused of bewitching Mr Awuonda.

Villagers attacked Mr Dwallo with machetes before he escaped.

They returned later at night and set five houses ablaze, killing the five family members. They were identified as Ms Amollo, Dwallo’s wife Helida Akinyi and their three children aged between 5 and 10.

Rongo Police Commander Kibet Kirui said four other family members escaped with serious injuries.

A girl aged eight is still unaccounted for.

Source: Daily Nation

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

RIP: K24 journalist laid to rest after suicide

Published

on

Former K24 journalist George Kori who committed suicide was buried on Wednesday in Elburgon.

The body of the late Mr Kori was found dangling from the tree on Sunday at their farm, six days after he was reported missing.

Kenya Union of Journalists Nakuru Branch Secretary Mr Kioko wa Kivandi on behalf of other journalists said they will campaign and sensitise members on mental health care in order to ensure that journalists are counselled as they face many challenges while on duty.

He said the country needs to invest in mental health. The late Kori suffered from depression.

“We need to know what triggered Kori to commit suicide and the cause of depression,” added Mr Kioko.

Eulogising his colleague, People photojournalist Raphael Munge called on journalists to share their problems with colleagues and family members.

“Our colleague died because of depression. If he would have shared his problems to us, we could have saved his life,” said Mr Munge.

Nakuru Governor Lee Kinyanjui said the county government will work with the media to ensure that they operate in a conducive environment.

Other leaders present include Molo MP Kuria Kimani, former MP Njenga Mungai and a host of MCAs, among other leaders.

By NN

Continue Reading

News

Widow recounts last moments with Jimmy Wayuni

Published

on

Widow of Kikuyu Benga Musician Jimmy Walter Githinji aka Jimmy Wayuni, who died Tuesday night in a car crash, says her husband was in high spirits the day he died.

Rosemary Wambui, 37, told Nairobi News at Kahawa Sukari Police Post where she had gone to record a statement, that the last conversation she had with her husband was on Tuesday morning as she left for work.

“On Tuesday morning, I left for work and left my husband back at home. He was in a jovial mood and nothing seemed unusual,” Ms Wambui said, flanked by her friends.

She said she got worried when it reached at around 9.30 pm on Tuesday and Mr Githinji had not returned home.

“I got worried after calling his line persistently and he was not picking yet it was ringing. His mobile phone later went off completely. I suspected that something was not ok,” she added

She said on Wednesday morning, she received a call from her friends who informed her that her husband had perished in a car crash.

The wreckage of benga artiste Jimmy Wayuni Githinji's car at the scene of the road accident. PHOTO | COURTESY
The wreckage of benga artiste Jimmy Wayuni Githinji’s car at the scene of the road accident. PHOTO | COURTESY

“He was a loving husband and a father. I have not believed he is gone. A very generous man. I have lost a gentleman,’’ she said

Ms Wambui said they had been blessed with two children.

The musician’s vehicle a Toyota Ipsum rammed a lorry at Kahawa Sukari near Githurai 45, as he headed to Nairobi from Ruiru, Kiambu county to drop a fellow musician home.

Ruiru OCPD Phineas Ringera on Wednesday told Nairobi News by telephone that the musician was trying to exit from Thika Road Super Highway and enter the service lane that leads to Githurai 45 when he hit a lorry from behind.

“What we have gathered so far is that the said musician was heading from Ruiru to Nairobi. He tried to exit the Super Highway at Kahawa Sukari and join the service lane that leads to Githurai 45 when he rammed into a lorry,” Mr Ringera said.

“He was seriously injured and was rushed to St Joseph Hospital where he passed on while undergoing treatment,” said the police boss.

Mr Ringera said the deceased’s body was transferred to Kenyatta University Funeral Home.

The musician is well known for his hit song ‘Airitu a Ruiru’ which translates to ‘Ruiru Girls’. In the song, he castigates them for being exploitative and manipulative.

His mangled vehicle was towed to Kahawa Sukari Police Post.

Fellow musician Kamande wa Kioi told Nairobi News that the deceased was escorting a fellow musician home by the name Jack Sam Kibandi, who resides in Githurai 45, when the accident happened.

The said musician was treated and discharged from hospital.

“Jimmy was taking a fellow Musician home using his car who resides in Githurai 45 and it’s when he was trying to branch from Thika Superhighway at Kahawa Sukari that he rammed into a lorry from behind,” said the artiste

Mr Kioi said the two were coming from Ruiru bypass where the deceased lives with his family.

By NN

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Why I offered a helping boob to my niece

Published

on

Breast milk is the perfect food for babies in their first six months of life. But if, for whatever reason, you are unable to breastfeed your baby, would you hand the task over to another woman?

To many, this is unheard off Actually breastfeeding someone else’s baby, known as wet nursing, is unthinkable for some mothers. This is exactly the same thought that Joan Iravwezi Shamwama had in December 2016 when she was diagnosed with stage one stomach cancer and was under medication.

Since she literally produced no breast milk and her baby Darionne was five months then, her husband decided to introduce baby formula to supplement the little breast milk she was getting. However, things didn’t work out well. The baby lost so much weight such that she became underweight. The family was also running out of money faster as they also had medical bills to pay.

However, her sister-in- law, Doreen Mulinya, who had given birth at the same time with Joan couldn’t sit and watch her niece suffer In this case, she decided to offer a helping boob. While her sister-in-law was taking her medication she assumed her niece’s feeding responsibilities.

 

Fulfilling endeavour

“The decision to wet nurse was something we discussed just as a possibility with my sister Sheila Mulinya before we travelled home for December holiday. It wasn’t serious at first, but my sister made me open up my mind by talking about old women who would breastfeed their grandchildren when the mums passed on,” says Doreen.

Seeing her in-law too weak to breastfeed [by then they were staying together in their mother’s house) it became a no brainer, Doreen had to do it.

“I usually have excess milk. Since I was healthy, I had no objection. At first Joan was shocked since she had not seen it before and she thought

that the baby won’t agree to feed from a stranger,” Doreen recalls.

According to Joan, seeing her daughter breastfeed normally was the best feeling ever. She had wished to exclusively breastfeed her daughter for six months. “I was so happy seeing her breastfeed though not from me. I thank God her aunt was there to play my role,” says Joan.

It was not easy for Doreen to breastfeed the two girls at first. Her baby couldn’t allow Darionne to feed. The children had to learn how to share since all of them were born as singlet. The other challenge was that since her niece had been starved of breast milk for a while, she used to pull, bite and kick because she couldn’t believe that she was feeding again.

“I had to endure the bites and kicks, but deep down, it was really fulfilling. It also made me become closer to my in-law and niece, and my brother too,” says Doreen.

Joan Iravwezi, her sister-in-law Doreen Mulinya and babies Darionne and Na’delle. Doreen breastfed her sister-in-law’s baby after cancerdiagnosis. BELOW: Darionne and Na’delle PD/MILLIAM MURIGI

Extra care

After one week, the family started seeing positive changes on Darionne. One month later, when both parted ways after the holiday, the baby had regained her weight and was ready to start weaning as recommended by World Health Organisation.

“I wish I could have done it longer, but I had to come back to Nairobi to work. But this is something I can definitely do again and again.

I usually have excess milk, so it’s a relief to me. The problem is having the mother to trust me,” says Doreen.

According to Joan, she would recommend wet nursing to women who are unable to breastfeed their children for one reason or another.

It is thought that wet nursing started in ancient times when a mother died during child birth and another woman breastfed and raised the baby. This was, especially so in some African cultures where maternal and child mortality was high.

Most African families were polygamous, and if one of the mothers in the family fell ill or died during childbirth, it was the duty of her co-wives to nurse and bring up the child.

Wet nursing has also been linked to social class, where monarchies, the aristocracy, nobility or upper classes had their children wet-nursed for the benefit of the child’s health, and sometimes in the hope of the mother becoming pregnant again quickly.

Experts argue that there is no reason why women should not feed more than one child simultaneously. Even women who are not lactating or do not have children can still breastfeed. Regular breast suckling can elicit milk production through a neural reflex action. Some adoptive mothers have also been able to establish lactation using a breast pump.

However, there has been growing concerns about milk sharing because some medical conditions such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis and most importantly HIV/Aids pose a great risk to the child if the wet nurse happens to be infected. This calls for extra care and precaution while choosing a wet nurse.

By People Daily

 

Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!