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How technology may have brought down Ethiopian Airways jet

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Just hours after an Ethiopian Airlines flight of model, 737 MAX 8 crashed killing all 157 people on board, airlines in a number of countries suspended the use of the aircraft over concerns about its safety.

Flight ET302 crashed Sunday 10March 2019 on its way to Nairobi minutes after it had taken off from Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

Pilots reported a technical problem then made a request to turn back to the airport shortly before the deadly clatter.In response to the crash, the Civil Aviation Administration of China ordered Monday that all domestic Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets be grounded by 6 p.m. local time, until the cause of the recent accidents involving the Boeing planes is fully established.

Other countries simply followed suit!

“Given in both air crashes, the aircrafts were newly delivered Boeing 737 MAX 8, and both accidents occurred during the take-off, they share certain similarities,” the Chinese administration said in a statement.

The March-2019 Ethiopian plane crash marks the second accident in five months that a new Boeing aircraft crashed just minutes after takeoff. In October last year, a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 flight went down over the Java Sea killing all 189 people on board.

While extensive investigations are still underway in both cases, preliminary reports show glaring similarities in the incidents that have prompted caution among some airlines.

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In its emergency order, America’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said that they have ‘identified similarities between the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight and the Lion Air crash in Indonesia,’ leading the agency to ground all Boeing 737 Max planes.

The Boeing Company is an American multinational corporation that designs, manufactures, and sells airplanes, rotorcraft, rockets, satellites, and missiles worldwide. The company also provides leasing and product support services.

Model 737 MAX is a narrow-body aircraft series designed and produced by Boeing Commercial Airplanes as the fourth generation of the Boeing 737, succeeding the Boeing 737 Next Generation (NG).The new 737 series was launched on August 30, 2011 but made its first flight on January 29, 2016 after getting series of new FAA certifications.

The first MAX 8 was bought and operated by Malindo Air, which placed the aircraft into service soon after the purchase.Boeing engineers introduced two safety technologies which, ideally were supposed to enhance the operability of the plane.

One of the technologies is Augmentation System, designed to reduce mid-air collisions between aircraft as well as to keep the plane at a responsive angle.

The other technology is Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) that monitors the airspace around an aircraft for other aircraft equipped with a corresponding active transponder, independent of air traffic control, and warns pilots of the presence of other transponder-equipped aircraft which may present a threat of mid-air collision (MAC).

READ ALSO:   Tears, anxiety and anger as kin wait hours for plane crash updates

“This particular aircraft has something new as far as how the autopilot responds when the aircraft’s nose is too high. It pushes that nose down even when the autopilot is off. And a lot of pilots are not used to that,” said Aviation Investigator David Soucie.

In the case of Indonesian and Ethiopian plane crashes, pilots repeatedly fought to override the Augmentation System but failed to prevail over the technology.

Whereas investigations are still ongoing, preliminary findings suggest that faulty sensors within Augmentation System could have led to wrong responses in the battle between the pilots and the technologies involved.Months before an Ethiopian Airlines crash killed 157 people, American pilots filed a complaint with authorities about perceived safety problems with the same aircraft.

According to USA Today, the two pilots reported their aircraft unexpectedly pitched nose down after they engaged autopilot following departure.It was also reported that another pilot experienced a “temporary level off” triggered by the aircraft automation. The captain of a flight called part of the aircraft’s flight manual “inadequate and almost criminally insufficient.”

“The fact that this airplane requires such jury rigging to fly is a red flag,” that captain – who was not identified by name – wrote in a report to the federal Aviation Safety Reporting System.

READ ALSO:   Anchor Dan Mwangi apologizes for 'rude gestures' on Ethiopia crash

The captain said part of the plane’s flight system was “not described in our Flight Manual.”Professional aviators who operated Boeing 737 MAX 8, and logged from April 2018 to December 2018 filed at least 11 reports concerning ‘erroneous’ automation responses.

Both Ethiopia and Indonesian ill-fated planes crashed after experiencing drastic speed fluctuations during ascent, and their pilots tried to return to the ground after takeoff.Aviation experts suspect that MAX 8’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, may have caused the jets to make unwanted dives.

In both cases, it’s believed that technology took over the control of the planes from the pilots, and all attempts to take back the control failed – leading to deadly crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia.

In fact, flight data recovered from the Indonesia crash indicated pilots repeatedly tried to get the plane’s nose up before impact.While responding to Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX 8 crash, Boeing issued a service bulletin warning pilots that erroneous flight data fed into the MCAS could force the aircraft into a dive for up to 10 seconds.

source: standard.co.ke

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Africa

University of Botswana to offer Brexit course

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A course about Brexit, the UK’s plan to leave the European Union, is to be offered as an option by the University of Botswana’s history department.

The course, called Modern Britain, will “study the crisis” as it happens, a notice shared on Twitter said.

Students will, however, not sit for an exam.

Bruce Bennett from the university confirmed to the BBC that the course will be offered.

“[It] is intended to link the present crisis, which is of interest to many people, to the historical background,” he said.

He said that as an elective course students from other departments would be able to take it.

“There has been interest from students from across the university, including of course political science but not limited to them.”

He added that other major events in British history would also be covered.

“This semester the British history course will focus on the Brexit crisis, as it happens, in combination with relevant British history. This historical background includes both relatively recent events such as the Northern Irish Troubles and the Good Friday agreement, and the deeper background.”

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Wails, muffled screams and prayers as families of the victims visit crash scene
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Igathe ditches Equity Bank and Kenyans wonder whether he can ever keep a job for long

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Equity Bank Managing Director Polycarp Igathe has rejoined Vivo Energy as Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing.

Igathe will assume his new role from September 1, barely a year after joining the lender.

“I am pleased to announce that Polycarp Igathe will rejoin Vivo Energy as the Executive vice president Sales and Marketing, a newly created role that is being added to the Vivo Executive Management (VEM),” Vivo Energy CEO Christian Chammas said in a statement.

In his new role, Igathe will be responsible for sales and marketing across the group.

Igathe was first named as Equity Bank’s Chief Commercial Officer in May 2018. The appointment came four months after he quit as Nairobi Deputy Governor citing lack of trust with his boss Mike Sonko.

He was promoted to the Equity MD position in September.

Igathe was the Vivo Energy Kenya MD before resigning to join politics.

His latest move sent Kenyans on Twitter into a frenzy, with many terming him a lucky guy whom “employment looks for.”

jeff_Elvtwin@JElvtwin

Some of us are seeking employment whereas employment is seeking Polycarp Igathe.

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just STEVE !!!@just_STEVE___

I pray to be as fortunate as one of these guys. Polycarp Igathe, Julius Kipngetich
Able to resign at breakfast and have another job by lunch time

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A.F. Abbott@MrPhyc

Alafu Polycarp Igathe aanze story za “create employment, don’t just wait to be employed..”

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@nicky🇰🇪@Dennoh0

Next year time like now,Nairobi governor Sonko reappoints polycarp igathe as Nairobi county deputy governor

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JOE MUHAHAMI@Muhahami

Polycarp Igathe has left Equity Bank and rejoined Vivo Energy.

Damn this guy change jobs like baby diapers 🙊

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Kevoh Alexis@kevinkarobia1

The rate at which Polycarp Igathe is switching jobs makes us wonder what he studied at school@polycarpigathe

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Lazooj@Lazooj

Polycarp Igathe can switch employers at will, you try switching employers yearly, and in your next job interview utaskia “You don’t seem loyal to your employers, 4 jobs in 2 years? why should we hire you? What guarantee can you give that you won’t leave before the year closes”.

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erick odhis@erickodhis

“Polycarp Igathe” somebody once told me up there the top of the pyramid they are very few and lonely never be surprised when an individual heads multiple organizations and grace all events invited

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John Muse@John__muse

Kwani Polycarp Igathe anakuanga na Rocket science degree?

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READ ALSO:   NARROW ESCAPE: Greek man arrived two minutes late for the flight, escaped death in Ethiopia crash
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VIDEO: Hope for Stateless Shona Community in Kenya as they are set to be given Birth Certificates

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Imagine living all your adult life as a stateless person. This is the case with at least 4,000 members of the Shona community who live in Kenya. Originally from Zimbabwe, Botswana, Malawi, Zambia and South Africa, they came to Kenya in the 1960s to spread the Gospel and although recognized by Kenya’s founding fathers, they were never granted citizenship. This situation has continued todate denying them basic rights including education and employment.

88 year old Mofat Ngwabi, sits comfortably in his chair in his home in Kinoo in the ouskirts of Nairobi, Kenya. Mofat is one of the few still alive who remembers when the Shona people of Zimbabwe arrived in Kenya in the 1960s.

He was part of a group of around 100 missionaries, who came to establish the Gospel of God Church. When they arrived they were met and welcomed by the first post-independence President of Kenya, Jomo Kenyatta. Mofat looks on proudly at a photo of the encounter with the President that hangs on the wall in the church office.

Despite the meeting, and receiving the blessing of the President to establish a church, the Shona could not be registered because under the first post-independence constitution, there was no provision for people not of Kenyan descent to be registered as citizens.

“We can’t enjoy services that nationals enjoy.”

It has rendered them stateless today, meaning without Kenyan citizenship or nationality.

As a result, Mofat, his seven children, nine grandchildren, and two great grandchildren who were all born in Kenya, have never had the right to become citizens. Though they speak the national language, Swahili, and local Kikuyu dialect spoken where they live. Though they are deeply ingrained in Kenya culture, from food to music. Though none of them has ever left Kenya to travel abroad, the fact that they are not recognized as Kenyans has left the family feeling a deep sense of despair.

It’s a problem affecting over 4000 Shona people in Kenya who descended from the church.

Mike Moyo, a Carpenter in nearby Kiambu County just outside the capital, is in the same situation as Mofat. All of Mike’s 10 children and 7 grandchildren were born in Kenya but are stateless.

“We are like dead men walking.”

“All my 10 children do not have birth certificates, and the older ones do not have identity cards. It’s awful,” says Mike.

Ramik, Mike’s eldest son says the effects have been dreadful.

“We can’t enjoy services that nationals enjoy. We don’t have mobile banking and going to the hospital is also a challenge. Birth certificate are needed for class 8 registration for our children who are in primary school so sometimes we are forced to ‘buy’ parents so that our children can continue with education. We cannot even save money.”

And so the vicious cycle of statelessness continues to the next generation in the Moyo family.

Some Shona people have married Kenyans which has helped their children acquire documents such as birth certificates. But the Shona say marrying nationals is not the solution. They say they deserve to be recognized as Kenyans.

The situation has meant that thousands of Shona people can’t be employed formally, and so survive doing informal work.

Many Shona women  weave baskets and do bead work to put food on the table they say. A lack of documents has forced them to sell their products for far less than they are worth through middle men.

Ben Kapota, a stateless father of eight who also lives in Kiambu says;

“I have been arrested several times because of moving around without an identity card. My community members had to bail me out. We are like dead men walking. If anything happens to us far from home, people will not be able to identify you just because you do not have an identity card.”

“I have been arrested several times because of moving around without an identity card.”

“If I got an ID card today, the first thing I will do is to get a driver’s license, then get a passport and start doing business.” Says Ben.

Kenya. The stateless Shona community still waiting for citizenshipShona women weave baskets on the floor of their home in the town of Githurai on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya. It’s their only source of income. UNHCR’s #IBelong campaign is committed to ending statelessness for an estimated 10 million people worldwide. UNHCR/T.Jones

Despite the situation, many Shona are however hopeful that the Kenyan government will give them citizenship soon.

Shona community leaders and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency in Kenya, have met with the government to try and find a solution for Shona people.

The Makonde community, originally from Mozambique were recently recognized by the government as Kenyans and given nationality, as the 43rd tribe of Kenya. This act has revived hopes that there will be a speedy solution for the Shona.

Read our statelessness report, “This is our home”: Stateless minorities and their search for citizenship” here. The report was released to mark the third year of the #IBelong campaign to end statelessness.

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