Connect with us

News

VIDEO: Kenyan Law Student in US Among 157 Killed in Ethiopian Airlines Crash

Published

on

A third-year law student at Georgetown University is among the 157 people who died after an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed Sunday morning, the school said.

Cedric Asiavugwa, a student at Georgetown Law, was on his way home to Nairobi, Kenya, after the death of his fiance’s mother, when the plane crashed 6 minutes after takeoff, Georgetown Law Dean William Treanor said in an email to the university community.

“With his passing, the Georgetown family has lost a stellar student, a great friend to many, and a dedicated champion for social justice across East Africa and the world,” Treanor said.

The airline crash on Sunday killed 157 people from 35 countries when the Boeing 737 Max 8 faltered and crashed shortly after takeoff. There were no survivors.

Asiavugwa was born and raised in Mombasa, Kenya, and graduated from the University of Zimbabwe with highest honors, according to the university.

“His commitment to issues of social justice, especially serving refugees and other marginalized groups, led him to Zimbabwe, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania before coming to Georgetown,” Treanor said.

Asiavugwa was an active member of the university’s campus ministry, and was a Residential Minister in one of the school’s residential dorms.

“He was a beloved member of Georgetown’s Campus Ministry offices, tending to a group of first-year undergraduates for the last three years as a Residential Minister in the New South residence hall on the Hilltop and also interning in the Law Center’s Campus Ministry office,” Treanor said.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan boy with Cerebral Palsy needs your help

Asiavugwa will be remembered for his “gentle soul” and “infectious smile,” Treanor said.

Fr. Greg Schenden, S.J., the director of campus ministry at Georgetown, told News4 that Asiavugwa was “a person of incredible kindness” who had a passion for social justice.

According to Schenden, Asiavugwa was a Jesuit but left before ordination to the priesthood. He then worked at St. Aloysius Gonzaga Secondary School, a free high school for orphans with HIV/AIDS in Nairobi.

At Georgetown, he participated in the law school’s Center for Applied Legal Studies clinic, where he assisted refugee clients who sought asylum in the United States.

“Cedric’s goal was to return to Kenya after his studies to pursue a career promoting the rights of refugees in East Africa and beyond,” the letter said.

The 7 p.m. Mass at the Dahlgren Chapel of the Sacred Heart on the Georgetown main campus was held in his honor, the school said.

-Agencies

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Africa

Woman with world’s longest nails reveals how she lost them

Published

on

Lee Redmond hasn’t cut her fingernails since 1979.

She dips them in warm olive oil every day and uses bottle after bottle of strengthening and polish to keep them in top condition.

At their longest, her nails on both hands measured a staggering 8.65m in total – earning her the Guinness World Record for the longest fingernails on a pair of hands (female).

She said: “It was just a challenge to myself to see how far they would go before they started twisting out of shape.

“I kept setting dates and dates that I was going to cut them and I just couldn’t do it.

“It’s strange how they become part of you.

“I think my fingernails defined me to a lot of people, I was known as the fingernail lady but to me, I would have to explain to them there really is more to me.”

She was devastated when she lost her nails [Photo: Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images]

But grandmother Lee, from Salt Lake City in the US, had her place in the record books cut short when she was involved in a terrifying car crash and her nails were ripped off.

She was sitting in the passenger seat when the car she was in crashed into another three vehicles, and she was thrown onto the road.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan man in US openly declares he is gay, says his family has rejected him

She said: “The first thing I spotted was a fingernail and I started crying.”

She told a witness at the scenes that her nails were record-breaking, and the woman went around and collected all the pieces of nails – which Lee now keeps in a plastic bag to remind her of her time in the Guinness book of fame.

She said: “It was just something I had to accept because I couldn’t change anything.

“The thing that bothered me was, it becomes your identity. I felt I had lost part of that.”

The accident means that while Lee still holds the record for the longest ever, she doesn’t hold the current record – which belongs to Ayanna Williams.

But she looks back at her time with long nails with pride, even though there were many things she struggled to do due to her extraordinarily long nails.

She became known as “The Nail Lady” [Photo: FilmMagic]

One of them was going to the toilet on a plane, and the nails meant she didn’t fit into the small cubicles.

This meant she had to not eat or drink for 24 hours before every long flight.

But she says she could manage to do most other things, including looking after her grandchildren, washing up and writing.

She used to use long pencils with rubbers on the end to type.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan boy with Cerebral Palsy needs your help

But the most common question she used to get asked? How she went to the loo.

Her answer: “Carefully”.

By Standard.co.ke

Continue Reading

Business

Fairmont Hotels reverses sacking of its employees

Published

on

Fairmont Hotels and Resorts has bowed to pressure from the government and staff union by withdrawing a memo which fired all its employees.

In a new directive issued by the Fairmont management, the hotelier said it had withdrawn the retrenchment memo circulated to staff on May 27, following a consultative meeting held with the Workers Committee Management and the Kenya Union of Domestic, Hotels, Educational Institutions, Hospital and Allied Workers (KUDHEIHA) on Wednesday.

“We would like to reiterate that the owners, Fairmont Hotels and Resorts and subsequently Accor Hotels are very committed towards the health, safety and wellbeing of the employees,” read the new memo.

“To this end, the Management has withdrawn the said memo as we continue with consultative meetings with all stakeholders until an agreement is reached.”

The workers union termed the sacking exercise as forced and contrary to provisions of an existing Collective Bargain Agreement (CBA).

In yesterday’s meeting, the union fronted a discussion on the payment of 50 percent of salary payments for the month of May.

“We are shocked that the procedures and provisions used by management do not meet bare minimums as provided by parties to the CBA,” read part of the letter by KUDHEIHA.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan man dies in his sleep in US

In a memo dated May 27, Fairmont the Norfolk and Fairmont Mara Safari Club ceased their operations as a spiral effect of the Covid-19 pandemic and the recent flooding of Fairmont Mara Safari Club.

“Due to the uncertainty of when and how the impact of the global pandemic will result in the business picking up soon, we are left with no option but to close down the business indefinitely,” said Mehdi Morad, Country General Manager Fairmont Hotels and Resorts.

In retaliation, the Solicitor General Kennedy Ogeto in a letter to the management demanded justification of the move by the hotel, saying the issue was  a matter of public importance. “This matter is of public importance and great concern to the Government and in view of the Attorney General’s mandate to promote, protect and uphold the rule of law and defend the public interest, this Office should be very grateful if you would provide it with clarification regarding the said media reports and complaints from employees, including on the veracity thereof and the justification for the taking of such action, if this is the case,” read a letter undersigned by the Solicitor General Kennedy Ogeto on May 29.

By Standard.co.ke

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

After failed bid to become a nun, now I rescue girls

Published

on

Growing up in Ndunyu Chege, Muranga County, Wangari  says she witnessed untold gender-based violence meted on women in her village. “What was happening in the village was like a competition to see man could beat their wives more severely; I remember one time when a man chopped his wife’s arm from the shoulder!” she says.

Wangari says such incidents made her hate the institution of marriage. In Class Six when a group of nuns visited her school to speak to students, she made up her mind to become one of them. This was a decision made to avoid the institution of marriage and the violence she had come to associate it with.

“When the nuns visited and told us about the vocation, I got a way out of what I thought was bad and I started wearing gowns synonymous with how nuns dress,” she recalls.

Her father, a teacher in a local school, supported her choice and changed how he looked at girls and their place in society. He encouraged Wangari to follow her heart. She would make the first false start into sisterhood when after her O-Level education at St Francis Girls School Mangu, she joined Little Sisters of the Poor, a religious community.

“The sisters run a home for the old people and this is where I was taken and I was given a job of looking after an 89-year-old man,” Wangari says. After a few days, she quit and joined Ursuline Sisters but, in her mind, it was still about escaping the institution of marriage. Her superiors realised this and gave her a two-month break to go and reflect on whether this was what she really wanted.

READ ALSO:   SAVE THE DATE: Kenya USA Diaspora Sacco 2020 AGM

“Two senior sisters in the community sat me down and asked me if I had really made the right decision and I tried to convince them that indeed I had but they decided that I had to go and think over it before I could come back,” she says.

She never went back. On the same day she left, she went to live with a lady whose husband was a military officer to avoid going back home. While in the house, she recalls the husband meting out violence on his wife to the point of burning her with a hot iron despite the fact that she was pregnant. That very day, she left the house and went back home to her parents.

“I told them that I was no longer going to be a nun, so my dad took me to college where I studied for a diploma in marketing,” she says.

She got her first job, starting off as at the front office desk at the Kenya Accountants and Secretaries National Examinations Board (Kasneb), she would work at the institution for 14 years before she left and started a magazine focusing on gender-based violence.

The journey to saving girls from early marriages would start in earnest when she was called to the Nairobi Women’s Hospital’s Gender Recovery Centre to do a story about a 13-year-old girl who had been defiled by a teacher and gotten pregnant.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan boy with Cerebral Palsy needs your help

She recalls: “We were told that the teacher had bribed the girl’s father with Sh3,000 and I asked to be given the girl to care for after she had left hospital.” From this experience, Wangari says she realised she did not have to wait until girls got themselves into these sticky situations before they were rescued. She says prevention is better than cure.

The 52-year-old has since then been involved in gender-based violence recoveries through the organization, Woman’s Hope. She has been rescuing girls from early marriages and pregnancies and putting them back in school. Through the organisation, she has rescued more than 500 girls.

How does she do this?

Using local chiefs and the Nyumba Kumi committees, she gets to know vulnerable girls who she picks and takes through a programme at the centre she runs in Karen. Social workers also help in identifying these girls.

After rescuing the first girl, she started an initiative called ‘Sweat It out for a Needy Cause’ where the fitness enthusiast would, together with her friends, donate Sh500 whenever they ran. From the funds they collected, they bought hygiene effects for vulnerable girls.

“We realised that these vulnerable girls were prone to getting early pregnancies and (into) marriages because of promises for small things like sanitary towels; we then started training the girls we rescued at a house we had rented which could care for 30 girls before moving to the current bigger centre in Hardy, Karen,” says Wangari.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan MP wanted by US authorities for escaping jail term over tax evasion

The girls are taken through a three-month training every year during school holidays in April, August and December, where they learn some basic skills. They meet counselors and mentors who speak to them. As part of the initiative, she came up with a ‘Dignity Pack’, which contains sanitary towels, panties, soap and petroleum jelly because in giving sanitary towels, some girls would come saying they have no panties which still exposes them to predators.  Wangari says that through the initiative, girls have learn skills while other have gone back to complete their formal education.

“When I get a girl who should be in school, I ensure that they first get back to school because I have experienced that in waiting we could lose the girl to early marriage of pregnancy,” she says.

Currently, the centre is making face masks for sale to as a means of sustaining the girls and some of the families they support. She has also roped in her zumba class to help in feeding the vulnerable, especially in Gataka, during these difficult times, which have left families struggling. When we caught up with her earlier this month, it was at an event at Tone La Maji Centre in Nakimurunya, Kajiado County, putting a smile on the faces of 33 boys.

By Standardmedia.co.ke

Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!