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Murderous mother narrates how she stabbed 5-year-old son to death

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“I was disappointed when I woke up at midnight to find that we were both alive after taking poison the previous night,” Sharon Wangare, the woman who stabbed her five-year-old son to death before attempting suicide told the police.

Ms Wangare confessed that after dinner on Saturday night (March 16, 2019), she made a concoction of drugs and took it together with her son, Maurice Karanja, because she wanted to die and not leave him behind.

In a statement recorded after the murder and attempted suicide, Ms Wangare said she woke up at some minutes to midnight to find that they were both alive and that she immediately started planning to execute her ‘Plan B’.

She said that she finally decided to take a kitchen knife, stabbed her s​on four times and then sat there as she waited for his heart to stop. She would then use the same knife to stab herself in an attempted suicide but not before texting her boyfriend to update him and ask him to come for their bodies.

“Jaribu kukuja kwetu ama mazishi utajua maiti iko na mashetani ni mimi,” read the text Ms Wangari had sent him the previous evening.

KNIFE STABBING

It was that text message that compelled John Njuguna to visit Ms Wangare’s house early Sunday morning, where he found the two on the floor.

Mr Njuguna admitted to the police that he knew his girlfriend meant every single word she said and was capable of killing due to her unstable health condition.

“I had spent the entire afternoon with the minor after which I escorted him home,” he told the Directorate of Criminal Investigations (DCI) officers.

During the visit to Wangare’s home, Mr Njuguna said, she had asked her son not to accept gifts from him but he insisted on having him take them.

The gifts, he realized after the murder, had been set on fire.

“When I got to the house on Sunday morning, I found the two on the floor. She was holding a blood stained kitchen knife in her left hand but could still move. She still had a pulse,” he told the investigators.

TREATMENT

He further stated that he immediately rushed out and informed the neighbours and with the help of two women, they rushed her to Bahati Sub-county hospital where she was given first aid then later taken to Nakuru Level Five hospital.

An autopsy report by government pathologist Titus Ngulungu indicated that the minor died after a knife pierced through his heart. Police reports indicate that the body of the deceased had been stabbed four times on the chest.

Ms Wangare’s father, Joseph Njoroge, told the police that his daughter, who runs a retail shop at Maili Sita Centre, had been suffering from Epilepsy and that she had been undergoing treatment at a certain Dr Njau’s clinic at Gate House in Nakuru town.

When she was arraigned before a Nakuru Court on Wednesday, clad in Provincial General Hospital’s blue patients’ uniform, Ms Wangare looked calm, with her head up.

The court allowed the police to hold the suspect at the Bahati police station for 10 more days in order to conclude their investigations into the murder.

The case will be mentioned on April 2.

source:NairobiNews

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Lifestyle

From troubled childhood, Kenyan-American eyes top seat in Minnesota

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Mr Boni Njenga, a Kenyan-American born in Nakuru Town, has risen from a boy with a troubled childhood to a man with an interest in an elective post in the US, come the elections on November 3.

Mr Njenga’s mother sent him to the US in 2003 to keep him away from bad peer influence after his high school education.

The single mother of six was concerned about the future of her troublesome son who attended four secondary schools.

He attended D.N Handa Secondary School in Naivasha for his Form One, moved to Coulson Secondary School in Gilgil the following year and then transferred to Kalou Secondary School in Ol Kalou for Form Two and Form Three.

He returned to D. N Handa where he sat his O’level exams.

He passed his Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education (KCSE) exams but his mother worried about the effects peer pressure would have on him.

“My mother was concerned about my discipline. I was giving her a difficult time due to bad influence from my peers,” he says.

“To save me from engaging in drug abuse and crime, she decided to send me to the United States of America to live with my brothers. I arrived in the US with a near-empty suitcase and $50 as pocket money.”

Today, Mr Njenga, an American citizen with a Master’s degree in Public Administration, is seeking to become the first Kenyan-American to sit as a commissioner in one of the county boards in the US.

He will vie for a position in the Hennepin County Board of Commissioners, District 5 (Bloomington, Richfield and Eden Prairie).

“We are facing challenges like the Opioid crisis, homelessness, lack of public safety, racial disparities and tax levy increases with no accountability and transparency on spending,” he says.

Campaign focus

Mr Njenga has lived and worked in Hennepin County for the last nine years.

Being a policy analyst, he says his campaigns are focused on five key areas – creating community wealth, closing achievement gaps, children protective services, safe and affordable housing and improving the quality of life for all residents.

“We can only solve these issues with fresh and bold 21st century governance and by applying evidence-based policy making, which will enable us to curb wasteful spending in Hennepin County, keeping more money in your pocket,” he says.

“I want to advocate for the rights of all residents. Today’s challenges require more than a single approach. They require fresh ideas, action and strong advocacy.”

Mr Njenga is challenging first term incumbent Debbie Goettel, whom he acknowledges as a formidable opponent but adds that he is up to the task.

Hennepin is Minnesota’s largest county with an annual budget of $2.5 billion that is overseen by a seven-member board of commissioners.

Mr Njenga criticises the county’s dismal record when it comes to contracting minority entrepreneurs and says one of his desires is to create community wealth, informed by the challenges marginalised communities face.

“Hennepin County, with its millions of dollars, spends less than one per cent in contracting the minority groups,” he says.

“I want to bring a 21st century approach to policy making,” adds Mr Njenga who has previously pushed for opportunities for marginalised groups.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Mr Njenga has been forced to run his campaigns on social media platforms.

“I reach out to voters through my Facebook page (Boni Njenga), my website (www.boninjenga.com) and Twitter account(@Boninjenga). It is not easy but the circumstances have forced us to keep social distancing.”

Experience

After moving to the US in 2003, Mr Njenga joined Minnesota State University-Mankato from where he obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and later a Master’s degree in Public Administration.

He has held supervisory and project management roles with the State before joining the private sector.

He says this background will enable him to offer ideas and innovative approaches for creating sustainable jobs and economic security.

“It will be quite an honour if residents of District 5 give me a chance to serve them and give back to the community that gave me a home and accepted me years ago.

“I have always had the passion for public service and politics. I value the quote by former US President J.F. Kennedy – ‘ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your county’.”

He adds, “I came here as a young confused man, unsure of what the future held for me, but through focus, hard work and mentorship by my lecturers, I can look back and thank my mother for sending me here. I know she is proud of me.

“My mother instilled in me discipline and the value of service to the people. Minnesota gave me an elite education and job experience and I have come to call it home. It will be an honour to serve Minnesota.”

Mr Njenga joins the long list of Africans seeking elective posts in Minnesota since the election of Congresswoman Ilhan Omar to the Minnesota Legislature in 2016, and to the US House of Representatives  two years later.

She is the first black person born in Africa to be elected to the US Congress and is the highest ranking elected African immigrant politician in the State.

by nation.co.ke

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Long serving US Supreme court Judge and cultural icon Ruth Ginsburg dies at 87

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US Supreme court judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman to serve on the apex Court and a pioneering advocate for women’s rights, who in her ninth decade became a much younger generation’s unlikely cultural icon, died on Friday. She was 87.

RBG, as she was popularly known, died in Washington DC  Friday after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

Born on March 15, 1933, she served on the court  from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated by President Bill Clinton on June 14, 1993.

Ginsburg became the second of four female justices to be confirmed to the Court after Sandra Day O’Connor, the two others being Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both of whom are still serving in 2020.

Following O’Connor’s retirement in 2006 and until Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court.

During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, which were noted by legal observers and in popular culture. She was generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg authored notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother, one of her biggest sources of encouragement, died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University, and became a wife and mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class.

Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg entered into academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women’s rights, winning multiple arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down; she was dubbed “The Notorious R.B.G.”, a play on the name of the rapper known as “The Notorious B.I.G.“, in reference to her notable dissents.[3]

She died at 87 years of age on September 18, 2020, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her home.\

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ODM announces plans to reconsider its policies

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BY KEVIN KOECH

A day after ODM party leader’s son Raila Junior made controversial remarks on the conduct of ODM politicians, the party has issued a statement on the same.

Speaking on behalf of ODM, Secretary General Edwin Sifuna announced that the party has plans to reassess its policies and make changes. Mr. Sifuna acknowledged that ODM needs to review its strategy.

He also noted that the party had initiated changes in its top organs. Additionally, he said that the changes are focusing on the 2022 general elections.

“We honestly looked at ourselves and even commissioned a task force to deliberate on internal issues. The team’s report, whose recommendations we have implemented, came with some indictment,” Mr. Sifuna stated.

“We wanted the task force to indicate our problems based on the report tabled before the National Executive Council (NEC) and adopted in its entirety,” he added.

The ODM Secretary-General also said that the party disbanded its National Election Board (NEB). Additionally, they disbanded the National Disciplinary Committee after it failed to discipline rebellious Malindi MP Aisha Jumwa.

Oduor Ong’wen, ODM’s Executive Director, also pointed out that they based the philosophy of ODM on fighting for human rights and devolution.

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