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We’ll continue giving money to churches, DP Ruto says

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Deputy President William Ruto has hit back at critics as the ‘dirty money’ in churches debate rages on.

Anglican Church Archbishop Jackson Ole Sapit waded into the debate when he announced that the church will review donations by political leaders.

Sapit spoke against using pulpits to ‘clean’ stolen money in the guise of charitable donations.

But on Wednesday, Ruto said his faith comes first before ‘politician’ titles.

“Since Sunday school we learned to kneel before and worship GOD that’s the ONLY reason we stand before men,” he said.

“We will continue to worship Jehovah with our hearts and substance.”

Ruto added that he is not unashamed of his God and unapologetic of his faith.

“We are Christians first other titles after,” he added.

The churches spoke against the backdrop of a vicious debate on harambees in churches.

Opposition leader Raila Odinga hit out at corrupt leaders for turning churches into avenues of laundering money obtained illegally from public coffers.

Wiper leader Kalonzo Musyoka also cautioned clerics against accepting money suspected to be proceeds of corruption.

Although the two leaders did not name names, their statements could have been a veiled attack on Ruto over his huge donations in church fundraisers.

READ ALSO:   Ruto-Nanok 'poverty-tourism'

Ruto’s penchant for church donations has been a subject of heated debates, with a number of leaders questioning the source of the millions he has been using to bankroll church activities all over the country.

The DP has, however, remained unapologetic about helping religious institutions and fashioned himself as an evangelist dedicated to spreading the gospel and supporting churches – at one point saying he is investing in heaven.

source:thestar

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Lifestyle

Dr Amoth attends burial with 400 people to represent Kagwe – PHOTOS + VIDEO

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The government is on the spot for applying double standards in the enforcement of Covid-19 prevention protocols, giving preferential treatment to particular politicians and well-connected individuals.

This was evident in Health Cabinet Secretary Mutahi Kagwe’s backyard in Mukurweini, Nyeri County where more than 400 people were allowed to attend the funeral of a retired teacher on Friday.

The government set out regulations banning all social gatherings specifically limiting the number of mourners attending a funeral to 15 close relatives.

However, for this particular funeral, a crowd of more than 400 locals from the Kihate area were allowed to gather at Mutwewathi Primary School grounds right under the watch of police, leaders and even senior ministry of health officials.

Health Ministry Director General Patrick Amoth led a delegation from the ministry to represent CS Kagwe who was also expected to attend the ceremony.

Mukurweini MP Anthony Kiai and Nyeri County Assembly Speaker John Kaguchia also attended the funeral.

A contingent of police officers from the National Police Service and the Kenya Forest Service had been posted at the venue to beef up security.

About 20 ushers had been posted at the entrance to screen mourners and hand out face masks to locals, many of whom showed up without.

READ ALSO:   William Ruto not qualified to be President - Martha Karua
DN and NTV crews were roughed up for taking photos of the funeral where at least 400 people were in attendance. PHOTO | NICOLAS KOMU

Hired goons were also later deployed with apparent instructions to separate the crowd from journalists and bar the press from accessing the school grounds.

Journalists from the Daily Nation, Joseph Kanyi, and NTV’s Melita Ole Tenges and Charles Muriithi were roughed up by the rowdy youth backed up by a gun-toting KFS officer for recording proceedings of the funeral.

They were demanding that the scribes delete all recording and photos they had taken.

“We are here to observe just how the government is enforcing its own directives. It is sad to see police officers harass journalists for doing their job,” Mr Tenges said.

The funeral went on uninterrupted and leaders present allowed to give speeches, including Dr Amoth.

Ironically, this comes barely a week after a widower was forced to spend a night at Tigania Police station with his wife’s body after relatives were barred from proceeding to their home for burial.

Charles Mwenda was forced to proceed for his wife’s burial at Kianjai in Meru County alone after a night of horror in the police station.

A similar incident was witnessed in Mathira, Nyeri County where Konyu Ward MCA Eric Wamumbi was forced to cut short his tribute to his deceased wife by police.

Police were deployed to ensure a limited number of mourners attended and the time for the funeral limited to 45 minutes.

READ ALSO:   Ruto-Nanok 'poverty-tourism'

“I am saddened that the police have no respect for the church and no feelings towards a family that had lost a loved one. It is very sad as to how low we have gone,” Mathira MP Rigathi Gachagua said during Mr Wamumbi’s wife’s funeral.

By Nairobi News

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Entertainment

VIDEO: Kenyan rapper Kahush confirms he is Health CS Kagwe’s son

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Health Cabinet Secretary Mutahi Kagwe has become a household name since the invasion of coronavirus into the country.

Kagwe has always been a private man when it comes to his family, but Kenyan online detectives never disappoint.

The netizens had been speculating that the young rapper identified as Kahush is the CS’s son.

In an interview with NRG radio, Kahush for the first time opened up about his family and confirmed what many had been anticipating to hear.

“Mutahi Kagwe is my dad. It is pretty obvious because his picture is in the video. Yeah that is it,” he said.

Kahush is a humble artiste who has not been implicated in any scandal and has instead been concentrating on his music.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBBkrJtgl7s/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

The young man is not based in Kenya. He lives in England. He went viral after the release of the song Mi Siwezi.

Kahush seems to be a low-key person judging by his social media posts which are limited for any celebrity kid or musician.

It is worth noting that in the video, which attracted the attention of many, the CS’s son observed social distancing, something which his fans were proud of.

It seems the young man has been in the country for a while since the coronavirus spread in most parts of the world.

READ ALSO:   Ruto-Nanok 'poverty-tourism'

Many consider Kahush to be very humble but always comparing him with the eloquent CS who has continuously encouraged Kenyans in the COVID-19 fight.

By Tuko.co.ke

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Africa

How working from home charted a new career for me

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When her children began going to school, Frida Mwangi, a stay-at-home mum, found herself in a crisis: she didn’t know what to do with the free time in her hands.

Though she really wanted to work, one thing she was sure of was she didn’t want an eight-to-five job.

“I wanted to be able to manage my house as usual. I had heard about online work and I started researching on what it was and how I too could do it from home,” she narrates

The research took about a month, and during this time, she connected with a Facebook community in Kenya comprising people who worked online.

It is by following the conversations that she discovered what she wanted to try out: transcribing.

“I was in the house for so long and lacked technical skills. I realised the easiest work I would have done there is transcription because all I needed was to understand English, which would assist me in following guidelines clients were looking for,” she says.

Determined to learn more about transcribing, Frida reached out to one of the ladies doing transcription training for tutorials and that’s how she learnt the craft.

In 2015, she began working as a transcriber in one of the leading global freelancing market spaces, where she became top rated after only four months in the job.

In 2017, she built a website, and registered her own online company dubbed, Kazi Remote.

“When I was still working as a transcriber, I thought transcription was a western thing and Kenyans did not need them.

READ ALSO:   Ruto: I won't stop raising church funds

After creating the website, I began getting calls from academics doing their thesis, market research companies in Kenya and law firms in need of transcription services. This expanded the base of my customers,” she explains.

Her website has also attracted clients from Europe, Canada and American clients, some of whom have come to the country for research and are looking for a person who understands and can write Kiswahili.

“I got Sh1,000 from my first client, but after PayPal charges I received Sh800.

For the first six months I worked alone and after that, I got a big client who had over 200 hours of work, which would last up to six months. He was a Stanford university student,” she says.

Frida soon realised she needed other trained transcribers to assist her with the workload.

Due to the nature of the work, Frida doesn’t have a permanent workforce, but works with freelancers who can work from home, provided they have a laptop and reliable Internet. She began with five freelancers, but is currently working with 20.

She says one hour recording can take four hours of writing and two hours for going through the work if one is a very experienced transcriber.

The standard time given in transcription is 24 hours hence one can plan on the amount of time they can spend on work.

“When I started, I charged clients Sh1,000 an hour of recorded work. Currently there are clients paying Sh6,000 or even Sh10,000 an hour, especially if you are working with business companies,” she says.

But working indoors came with the challenge of people dropping in her house all the time thinking that she was free with nothing to do.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Unless they murder me, I won't stop, DP Ruto says almost shedding tears

“I would receive visitors and I didn’t know how to tell them that I am working.

It got to the point where I would lock the house after taking my kids to school so that people would think am not around.

Or if they managed to come in, I would leave them in the living room on their own,” she narrates.

Slowly by slowly, Frida managed to resolve this issue as family and friends began taking her work seriously.

But even while others understood she was working, there were those who branded her a mzungu, because of this strict way of living.  Another challenge was the consistency of work.

“When it comes to bidding, this is online and it’s not about where you went to school or how many degrees you have, but whether you are able to solve the client’s problem,” she says.

Frida notes the reason most people fail in online work is because they treat it as a side hustle instead of a main gig and also don’t conduct enough research while at it.

“Online work is something you can do as a career. For instance, right now, the highest paid job is intellectual property something that a lawyer from Kenya can do if they acquire the relevant skills.

There is a lot of demand for them in that they can actually earn Sh15,000 per hour online,” she explains.

People interested in this field should ensure they learn new skills on top of the ones they have and be intentional on their career path.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Ruto's silence is deafening as IEBC announces Imran Okoth the winner of "Raila's Bedroom" Kibra by-election

Her customer base increased after she created her website as people were able to find her on Google.

Frida notes one reason transcribing is not established in Kenya is because unlike in the West, it is not included in the laws.

In countries such as the US, there are laws which ensure that videos, audios are also texted so people who can’t read or write can access the information.

“In America, there are companies who have earning calls (teleconference, or webcast in which a public company discusses financial results of a reporting period), which must be transcribed.

These calls need to be transcribed within six hours and uploaded to the company’s websites. These are the ones who pay up to Sh10,000.

There are also universities, which require students doing research projects must have their interviews transcribed when it’s qualitative.

Some colleges there go as far as having budgets for transcription,” she adds.

Her effort was rewarded in 2018 when she was listed among the Business Daily 40 under 40 Women.

“When you look at that whole list, there was no single person in the online industry so I am happy that through me, they were represented.

One of my aunties saw that and asked how the media found me when I’ve always been in the house,” she recalls.

By PD.co.ke

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