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Why Ipsos-Kenya sacked analyst Tom Wolf

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Sacked Ipsos analyst Tom Wolf says he is still in the dark over the exact reasons that led to his axing from the leading market research firm.

After more than a decade as the corporate face of Ipsos Kenya (previously Steadman and Synovate), this past Monday, Dr Wolf announced that his contract had been terminated effective March 31.

“This is as a result of the decision made by Ipsos in Paris that Ipsos-Kenya should not include ‘political’ survey results in its public releases for the foreseeable future … on the basis of this decision, it was judged that my position as a research analyst had become redundant. I was therefore given notice, which took effect on March 31 this year. I am thus no longer associated with Ipsos,” he had said in a statement.

In an interview, Dr Wolf said his sacking came as a surprise and no plausible reason has been given to him for the decision. But he admitted having been given several months’ notice.

“I can tell you that I have never received from Ipsos in writing or even verbally any major criticism of my work. On the contrary, it was often praised, by both local and global Ipsos management. However, on several occasions, we were advised that we were releasing ‘too much’ information to the media at a time thus swamping them with data, and that my presentations to the media were at times ’too academic’.

“I am not saying my work is perfect, not at all. But no one ever questioned the core of what we were doing,” he said.

Dr Wolf’s sacking and the apparent shift in policy by Ipsos with regard to political surveys in Kenya has caused consternation as to what could have led to such a shift.

But Ipsos Kenya CEO Aggrey Oriwo told the Sunday Nation there is no change in policy that he is aware of.

“Ipsos has no intention of disengaging from political polling in Kenya. We will get back to tracking voter’s intention as we get closer to the next election. We do a lot of polling in Kenya on many issues. As always, we will continue to release it to the media on a regular basis,” Mr Oriwo said.

Two years ago, the government of Egypt ordered Ipsos’ office in Cairo closed amid criticism from pro-government talk show hosts and state-aligned newspapers for “sympathising with the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, links to foreign intelligence agencies, labour law violations, and tax evasion, all of which it denies,” Reuters reported in July 2017.

The sacking of Dr Wolf came after an unusually long period during which none of its national household surveys have been released.

Ipsos Kenya last released its survey data on September 19, 2018, some seven months ago.

“All I can say is that Ipsos was known for doing three to four surveys per year and releasing some of the results to the public through the media, while other results were client-privileged. But I am not revealing anything confidential when I say that this recent period is the longest without any such release since I started working for Steadman in 2005,” Dr Wolf said.

But Mr Oriwo rejected reports that the firm’s global headquarters has been embargoing survey results and blocking their release.

“This report is false. We have a central polling group that supports our polling worldwide. The decisions about how and when we do political polling in Kenya is ultimately made in Kenya with global support and oversight. The decision about what polling is released is made cooperatively by our Kenya and global polling team,” he said.

Mr Oriwo also said he was not at liberty to discuss Dr Wolf’s exit from the polling firm.

“As for Dr Wolf, this is a private matter and we do not discuss staff/personnel issues in the media,” he said.

Dr Wolf also questioned Ipsos’ silence on his sacking though he was “a fairly well-known figure” and for many years the public face of Ipsos in Kenya.

“Ipsos’ silence and my departure from work have made me extremely sad. Granted, it has given me a useful income and I have to enjoy being in the limelight somewhat. After teaching in high school at the Coast in the 1960s and later at the University of Nairobi, I find it quite stimulating to stand before journalists during our briefing and helping them to analyse survey results, and as you know, I also often privately complain to them when I feel their published interpretations are incorrect,” he said.

“I have also found participation in various TV and radio interviews and panel discussions most challenging in a positive way.”

Failure by Ipsos to announce his exit, he says, is what prompted him to issue a statement.

“The main reason I issued a statement to the media about my departure was that Ipsos was silent and I already had been out of work for over a week. Mind you, there was no discussion with me before I left as to how to make this public.

“In the absence of any guidance as to what the company was going to do, given that I have become a fairly well-known figure, I thought it was proper for me to tell the public. Even my colleagues in the office were unaware of what had happened until I issued my statement,” he said.

source:nation.co.ke

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Business

Here are the 100 best employers in Kenya listed in order of merit

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A new report released this week  by Brighter Monday lists top companies that have an all-round best environment to work for in Kenya.

The annual report titled, Best 100 Companies to Work For 2019, ranks Safaricom, East African Breweries, United Nations, Kenya Commercial Bank and Kenya Revenue Authority as the country’s best five companies to work for.

Kenya Pipeline Company, Kenya Electricity Generating Company, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Coca Cola and Kenya Airways complete the top 10 listing in the order.

The report stated that a total of 3,448 valid responses were used in the final analysis with data from two surveys – external and internal.

The external survey targeted the general public while the internal survey focused on employees working at numerous companies in Kenya – a majority aged between 25-35 and 18-24, live in Nairobi and hold a Bachelor’s degree.

WHAT MATTERS MOST

“Overall top five most ranked intrinsic traits that matter the most in a company are competitive pay package, job security, career growth, financially stable company and welfare benefits,” Brighter Monday CEO Emmanuel Mutuma said.

In determining the best 100 companies to work for, the survey looked at attributes that matter most to employees which include pride, culture, career growth, diversity, inclusion as well as competitive pay package.

According to the report, Kenyans aged between 25-35 are the happiest age group at work, followed by 18-24, although both age groups posed a high flight risk.

Below is the list of the Best 100 Companies to work for in 2019:

1. Safaricom
2. East African Breweries
3. United Nations
4. KCB Bank Limited
5. Kenya Revenue Authority
6. Kenya Pipeline Company
7. Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen)
8. PricewaterhouseCoopers
9. Coca Cola
10. Kenya Airways
11. Deloitte
12. Unilever
13. Kenya Power
14. Equity Bank
15. British American Tobacco
16. Centum Investment Company
17. Google
18. Kenya Ports Authority
19. Airtel
20. Britam Holdings Limited
21. Central Bank of Kenya
22. Nation Media Group
23. Royal Media Services
24. Bidco Africa
25. Toyota
26. CBA Kenya
27. Cytonn Investments
28. Bamburi Cement
29. Barclays
30. Kenya Red Cross
31. World Vision International
32. Standard Chartered
33. Brookside Dairy Limited
34. Andela Kenya
35. Kenya Medical Research Institute
36. Microsoft
37. Isuzu East Africa Limited
38. Kenya Bureau of Standards
39. Glaxosmithkline
40. Amref Health Africa
41. DHL
42. SportPesa
43. World Bank
44. Bonfire Adventures
45. IBM
46. Telkom Kenya
47. National Hospital Insurance Fund
48. Chandaria Industries
49. Jumia
50. EY
51. Cellulant Corporation
52. GE
53. Jubilee Insurance
54. UNICEF
55. USAID
56. Geothermal Development Company
57. Nestle
58. Oxfam
59. Oracle
60. CITI Bank
61. P&G
62. Davis & Shirtliff
63. Kenya Co-operative Creameries Ltd.
64. International Livestock Research Institute
65. Tuskys
66. CIC Insurance Group
67. The Nairobi Hospital
68. Kenya Tea Development Agency Holdings Ltd.
69. One Acre Fund
70. United Nations Environment Programme
71. Kenya National Bureau of Statistics
72. Total Kenya
73. Base Titanium Port Facility
74. Kenya Medical Supplies
75. Save the Children Kenya
76. Kenya Ports Authority
77. Naivas Limited
78. Bollore Logistics Kenya
79. Del Monte Kenya
80. NIC Bank Group
81. British High Commission
82. Kenya Electricity Transmission Company
83. Huawei
84. Plan International Kenya
85. Amiran Kenya Ltd.
86. DT Dobie
87. Kapa Oil Refineries Ltd.
88. Samsung
89. James Finlay
90. Vivo Energy Kenya
91. BBC
92. Carrefour Kenya
93. Liquid Telecom
94. ICEA General Insurance
95. Kenya Seed Company
96. Kenyatta National Hospital
97. Mabati Rolling Mills
98. Mombasa Cement
99. KALRO
100.KEPHIS

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Kenyan Gay Movie Screened at Milimani Courts for Judge

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Rafiki means friend in Swahili but in the LGBTQ+ circles, it is a litmus test that emboldens this community to mainstream or remain closeted in Kenya.

The Rafiki movie has been screened in major cities and events across the world but back home in Kenya, the Wanuri Kahiu production faces a gargantuan task to be accepted.

Despite Kenya being a conservative but horny country, those in the gay community cannot portray this in public due to the homophobia the country harbours.

Gay Movie at The Law Courts

On Thursday, Wanuri tweeted, “BEYOND EXCITED to be screening Rafiki in Kenya tomorrow at Milimani High Court!!! #FreedomOfExpression.”

She is pushing the boundaries and her tack with the courts could be the turning point for Kenya in regard to homosexuals and how they relate with each other in public.

Thereafter in a series of tweets, Wanuri explained why it was important for the event to happen.

 

 

“My film Rafiki will be screened in the Kenyan High Court,” she added saying that it was historic and “so important in the fight for Freedom of Opinion/ Freedom of Expression/ Freedom of the Media.”

The movie was screened in the Kenyan High Court in a first while still banned in the rest of the country.

However, for it to qualify for the Oscars shortlisting, it had to be watched locally and in a court ruling, Judge Wilfrida Okwany allowed the screening of the film for seven days to ‘willing adults’.

The ruling temporarily suspended the Kenya Film Classification Board (KFCB) ban and the movie was screened.

In banning the movie, KFCB said the movie was seeking to legitimise lesbian romance.

Wanuri blames Kenyans over the ban saying that they did not advocate for it.

In her campaign which she pushes under the freedom of expression tenet, Wanuri may have succeeded in pushing her agenda by having the courts watch the movie.

She said, “When films, music, art is banned or censored it interferes with our constitutional rights to make and/ or watch the work we create. Rafiki screening in court allows the court to make a decision on IF there has been a breach of constitutional rights”

“Our wish is that Rafiki helps towards upholding the articles in our Bill of Rights as enshrined in our constitution,” she added.

In her updates, she hailed the feat: “So great to see LGBT+ 🏳️‍🌈 story here in Kenyan Court. Even if only as evidence as part of case. Every voice matters, every voice is important.”

After the screening on Friday, she said the judge asked for a few paragraphs to be submitted based on the film. The arguments are to be heard on December 3.

Kenya Upholds Gay Sex Ban

In May this year, High Court judges Roselyn Aburili, Chacha Mwita and John Mativo ruled against gay sex in Kenya. With this, they upheld a law that makes same-sex affairs punishable by 14 years in jail.

The United Nations and rights activists criticized the ruling which is similar to 70 other countries around where same-sex relationships are a crime.

Justice Roselyn Aburili said, “We hereby decline the relief sought and dismiss the combined petition. We find that the impugned sections are not unconstitutional, accordingly the combined petitions have no merit.”

When President Barack Obama visited Kenya in April 2015, President Uhuru Kenyatta told him that the gay rights agenda was a non-issue for Kenyans.

“We share a lot of things but gay issues are not among them. We cannot impose on people what they don’t accept,” Uhuru told Obama.

He added, “I want to be very clear, I will not engage in any subject that is not of any major importance to the people and the Republic of Kenya. This is not an issue of human rights, this is an issue of society, of our own base as a culture as a people regardless of which society you come from. This is not acceptable, this is not agreeable.”

Uhuru urged the Americans to respect the Kenyan society which rejected same-sex marriages.

-businesstoday.co.ke

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Kenya’s Filthy Rich and Politically Connected running Govt Agencies

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Kenya has become the butt of jokes (no pun intended!) as the country wastes away due to corruption overseen by those in the highest office in the land.

Despite the billions being wasted daily repaying loans that have benefited a few individuals, Kenyans, on the other hand, are languishing as those entrusted with making their lives better continue looting. The country has become a gangsters’ paradise.

Wambui Kibaki and Her Millions

The first agency that was established by an act of parliament to empower youth is the National Employment Authority which has become a fresh wound for job seekers who never seem to meet the criteria for securing a government job.

On Tuesday, Kenyans were up in arms after it became public that President Uhuru Kenyatta had appointed President Kibaki’s wife, Mary Wambui, as the Authority’s Chairperson.

For a term of three years, Wambui is expected to ensure that jobless Kenyans get opportunities and jobs that can alleviate their suffering.

Ironically, Wambui, a conservative and controversial millionaire does not need the job in the sense that she already has more than enough. But why would she take such a position? That is for the appointee and the appointing authority to explain to Kenyans.

 

 

Most other authorities are led by people whose only merit is being politically connected.

These include the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) whose leadership comprises of Eng Joseph Nakodony Nkadayo as the Chairman with Captain Gilbert Macharia Kibe as the Director-General. Nkadayo succeeded a political reject, Samuel Poghisio, who left the entity in 2017 after serving for 2 years.

The other is Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) whose disappointing performance could only go to show the incompetence of those appointed.

Interestingly, the former long-serving head of civil service Francis Muthaura is the chairman of the tax collector. He was appointed for the position last year.

The Sacco Societies Regulatory Authority (SASRA) non-executive chairman is John Mati Munuve.

An interesting political reject serving on the SASRA board is former North Imenti MP Silas Muriuki Ruteere.

Muriuki is a teacher by profession with specialized training in Special Education.

Tana and Athi River Development Authority (TARDA) is chaired by Halima Abdillahi Shaiya who was fired from the Kenya Meat Commission in 2014.

A suspension letter presented in court showed that the KMC board was fired for breaching procurement rules, poor performance and failing to implement directors’ resolutions.

The Retirement Benefits Authority (RBA) is chaired by a relative to President Uhuru Kenyatta Victor R. Pratt. Pratt is the husband to Christine Wambui Kenyatta, now Kristina Pratt, who is Uhuru’s older sister.

A politician on the board of directors going by the information on the Authority’s website is politician Sammy Koech who is the MP for Konoin.

The National Transport and Safety Authority (NTSA) is chaired by Lt Gen (Rtd) Jackson Ndungu Waweru. He was appointed in 2016.

Kenya National Highways Authority (KeNHA) is chaired by Eng Erastus Mwongera whose appointment was challenged in court. In the petition by Peter Tana, Mwongera’s appointment was in gross violation of the rule of law.

Tana said that is not suitable to serve in the capacity since he had already served two terms. The tenure at KeNHA is to end in March 2021.

Mwongera cannot discharge any official duties as KeNHA Chairperson until the hearing and determination of the petition.

The National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) is chaired by John Konchellah but the interesting twist is the political connections in the authority’s op management.

Rejects serving at NEMA include Agostinho Neto who was the Ndhiwa MP in a by-election in 2012 and re-elected in 2013.

The immediate former Tana River woman representative Halima Ware Duri also serves as a board member.

In March this year, the Kerio Valley Development Authority (KVDA) board appointments caused an uproar since the maximum number of 10 appointees was surpassed by 3 members.

The board is chaired by former MP Jackson Kiptanui.

And the Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) is chaired by another political appointee Retired Joseph R.E Kibwana.

Kibwana, who was the first Navy officer to occupy the office of the Chief of General Staff, oversaw the transition of power from President Daniel Moi to President Mwai Kibaki after the 2002 election.

The General has a chequered career having been among the first of 10 African officers and servicemen recruited to the Navy in 1964.

The Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) is chaired by Isaac Awuondo.

In August, KAA announced the departure of its Managing Director/CEO Jonny Andersen, effective September 30, 2019.

“Jonny has been with the KAA since November 2016 opted not to renew his contract which was due to expire on November 21st 2019,” said a statement from the Authority.

James P.M. Ndegwa is the Chairman of the Capital Markets Authority (CMA). Coming from among Kenya’s wealthiest families, his seat at the table is reserved.

Interestingly, Muthaura’s son Paul Murithi is the CEO. He was appointed on April 22, 2016 with the call backdated to January 2, 2016.

He is expected to leave CMA at the end of this year after serving for seven-and-a-half years.

Out of the 14 Authorities in Kenya, most of them have politicians who have lost in elections appointed as board members or chairs.

In a country where a majority of the youth are wasting away despite their academic qualifications, consecutive governments have consistently sidelined the youth in favour of the politically connected.

Only President Kibaki gave the youths a considerate treatment when he opened the system for youth self-employment. Kibaki’s time saw the country register the highest number of the motorbike industry jobs.

It is at this time that boda bodas became part and parcel of the Kenyan society.

-businesstoday.co.ke

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