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DID YOU KNOW? Safaricom’s Bob Collymore has no University degree but still turned out fine

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  • Robert ‘Bob’ Collymore has been Safaricom CEO since November 1, 2010.
  • Collymore did not go to university. He was offered a place at Warwick University but turned it down because he was not eligible for funding
  • A wealth declaration form uploaded on the Safaricom website in 2015 revealed that he earns Sh10 million per month

Robert ‘Bob’ Collymore may not have a college education but he is at the helm of Safaricom, a company that is arguably one of Africa’s finest and a trend setter in the world of communications.

1. University education isn’t everything

There tends to be a lot of reliance on paper qualification. We stuff ourselves into universities, then we come out and there is very little difference between us and all the other people who also did the same.

In this industry and many others, if you are not a learning treadmill, you will be left behind very rapidly. The advances that we are seeing in technology such as in artificial intelligence, robotics – I do not have to go to school to learn about it.

I can learn about it because the resources are there. I can buy a book on Amazon in two clicks.

So get into continuous learning instead of relying on the old things you learnt in university – things have moved on.

2. Be adaptable

I have done many different types of jobs but I never anticipated that I would become the CEO of a mobile phone company in Africa.

Just because you went to university and studied law doesn’t mean you become a lawyer.

 

You need to go into the world knowing that what you learnt in the university was how to learn. You must be adaptive.

3. There is no shortcut

Millennials believe that once you get employed, it will take you a matter of weeks before you get the corner office and get the land cruiser.

We forget that in all ages, especially in this one, everything takes time. Whether you want to become a basketball player or a CEO, you have to put the hours in.

You do not become a good photographer if you do not do 20,000 hours behind that camera. Shortcuts tend to lead people to a lot of problems, often legal problems.

My earnings are not a secret to Kenyans, but you can see that I am not hugely wealthy, compared to other people.

But do I consider myself a failure? Of course not. I do not want to find a shortcut to riches because they are not the goal. Unfortunately, a lot of people think there is a shortcut to it. You have to work hard.

Bob Collymore.

4. Be hungry

Grab opportunities. Opportunities sometimes present themselves only once and you have to grab them.

Because at later stages, what you regret is not the things you did, but the things you did not do. All my regrets are of things I did not do.

Luck also has a big role to play, so again, don’t sniff at luck. When luck presents itself, just take it. When you get a good fortune, just take it.

5. Learn the art of gratitude

We tend not to be grateful these days. Be grateful for what you have. If you wrote down the things that you are grateful for, you would be amazed.

Grateful people are much more agreeable than people who grow up thinking about how they did not get a break.

If I look at my own background, coming from a broken family, a single mother, being the only black kid in the school that I went to in the UK, not going to university – there is a whole lot of things that I can stack up and say are all the reasons I should not be doing the job I am today.

If I had let them hold me back, I would still be working in a shop like I used to.

6. Lose the sense of entitlement

READ ALSO:   Safaricom best employer in Africa

I never had the sense that I could not work in the shops because I had completed my A-levels. I was a delivery chap delivering furniture, I used to stack shelves – I never imagined I was too good for any job.

I did a lot of things and I said, “It’s a job. I will do it and I will take my lessons from each and every one of those jobs.”

If you look at how I engage with people working in shops when I go shopping, my interaction with them is shaped by that experience because I walked in those shoes. I worked behind that checkout. I know how dehumanising people can treat you sometimes.

I hold those people with huge admiration and respect. Don’t have a sense of entitlement. You are never too good for anything.

 

You are never too good to sweep floors and all. That is the thing about opportunities. They may not present themselves as you expect them to.

7. Move with the times

We are in the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, where we are looking at the internet for everything. The fourth industrial revolution plays to older people because it makes things easier for us.

However, it does not play to young people because it will definitely take away jobs. In Africa, we need to create about a million jobs every month, which is about 10 to 15 million jobs every year.

That is a huge number. Even here in Kenya, I estimate that we need to create about 3,000 jobs a day.

That’s a scary thought and it is because that’s how fast the population is growing.

Foxconn, the people who make the iPhone, reduced their workforce by half because of robotics.

In Africa, we have a narrow opportunity to take some of the manufacturing from China, but that opportunity is not going to be there for long. We should be grabbing those opportunities now.

What we are seeing is that the people grabbing those opportunities are from places like Vietnam, so if we do not grab them now, by the time we come around we will be out of the game.

8. Are your skills important in today’s world?

Get to the front of the curve. Read. I always tell my team, “I mustn’t know more about stuff than you. You have to be smarter than me.

If you aren’t smarter than me, then why would I need to hire you?” You need to stay ahead of the curve and there is no excuse for not doing it because everything is online these days. You need to ensure that you are skilled to do the jobs that exist today.

Bob Collymore.

If you ask how many people getting out of the university today are familiar with things like artificial intelligence and data analytical skills, they are very few. Many of them write letters to me asking me to give them a job since they have a Bachelor’s Degree in communication. I do not need that.

However, if you have data analytical skills, I will hire you today. Young people, therefore, need to move away from the trend of wanting to have a BCom degree or becoming a lawyer. With the 4th industrial revolution, it is not just blue collar jobs that will disappear. Many white collar jobs will also disappear.

You are not going to need lawyers to do everything they do today. A lot of it is very laborious and you can get a machine to do it. The same goes for investment analysts. You will get a machine that can trade much faster than human beings can trade. A machine can trade 24 hours a day and can trade by the second.

9. Study what the market needs

Young people need to become familiar with the challenges that the world is facing and the opportunities that are there.

The biggest mistake we make is that we have what I call the ‘Kiosk Mentality’. So if I am a hawker and I am selling oranges and the neighbouring hawker is selling bananas and she sells more bananas today, guess what I am going to do tomorrow?

READ ALSO:   Safaricom net profit hits Sh63.4bn

 

I will sell bananas! You see that mentality even in the construction of shopping malls. I have been here for about seven years and suddenly there is a shopping mall everywhere, but now there are empty shopping malls everywhere.

Go and create your own space. Don’t just copy what someone else does. Study what the market needs.

10. Fix the problem

I spend a lot of time with young investors. Sometimes I will be in London or New York and someone stops me and tells me about their start up in Kenya. What is disappointing is that these people often come from San Fransisco and Silicon Valley.

They came to Kenya, looked at the problem and thought of a way to solve it. The biggest example is probably M-Kopa. It was started by a Canadian, Jesse Moore, and Nick Hughes, a Briton.

They looked at simple problems, sat in my office one day years ago and said that the problem was that people do not have access to grid electricity and they thought they could fix that problem. So they did, by making M-Kopa solar.

Young people need to be doing that. Don’t go and make another M-Kopa solar, because it has already been made. It’s like Jack Ma says – China is not going to have another Jack Ma because they already have one.

Bob Collymore.

They don’t need anymore. Go redefine the market and fix those problems. It’s not about being smart – it’s about being relevant. Go fix the problem. Problems are everywhere. Look at them and think, “How do I tackle that problem?” not “How do I copy what he did?”

11. You aren’t perfect

If you are 100 per cent perfect, then you are not trying hard enough. You are not doing enough things.

My predecessor, Michael Joseph, once said to me, “Look, just make decisions. If 60 percent of your decisions are right, then you will probably be doing better than me.” And he was right.

We make a lot of wrong decisions, but it means we are trying. A little under 1 out of 2 of your decisions will be wrong and that is OK because it means you are trying new things.

12. Read and read some more

This speaks to continuously learning. I probably get through two or three books in a month, to try and keep myself ahead of the curve. If I am not travelling a lot, then I read more.

I tend to read two or three books at the same time so that if I get bored with one, I can pick up the other.

However, if I could recommend books it would be Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari and Reclaiming Conversation by Sherry Turkle.

 Biography

Robert William Collymore aka Bob Collymore was born in 1958 in Guyana. He lived with his grandmother while his mother lived in the UK.

At age 12 he realized he had an interest in the arts where and started making art pieces using plasticine sent to him by his mother from the UK. He sold them and made good money. That’s where his business acumen was mooted.

At age 16, he landed his first job in a departmental store in the UK where he worked from as early as 6 AM until the store was closed when he would sweep it clean.

 Education

Bob  started schooling in Guyana while still living with his grandmother until age 16 when he moved to the UK to join his mother in 1974.

He joined Selhurst High School for Boys in London where he completed his formal education. Here, he is said to have experienced some form of racial discrimination since he was the only black child in his class.

READ ALSO:   Collymore to leave office as row erupts over successor

 Career

He is the Chief Executive officer of Mobile operator Safaricom Limited Kenya since October 2010. He also serves as a Governance director for Africa at Vodafone.

Prior to that, he served as a Chief Officer of Corporate affairs at Vodacom Group Limited. He also served as a purchasing director for UK Business of Vodafone.

He also served as Purchasing Director for Dixons Stores Group, The Largest Electrical retailer in the UK between 1994-1998.

He served as the Global Handset Purchasing Director of Vodafone since 2000 and responsible for its handset business across 26 countries and in 2003 he moved to Japan in the commercial role of Consumer Marketing Director for Asia.

He became a non-Executive Director of Safaricom Limited on September 5, 2006, until he finally became the Safaricom CEO in 2010, replacing the outgoing CEO Mr. Michael Joseph who had held that position since Safaricom’s nativity in 1998.

 Hobbies

Bob Likes flying helicopters. He also likes reading a lot. His love for art and music also led him to meet his wife Wambui Kamiru who was an artist at Kuona Trust.

Bob Collymore marries Wambui Kamiru

Bob Collymore met his sweetheart Wambui Kamiru in Nairobi during a fundraiser for survivors of the Loreto Convent Msongari school bus crash that occurred in July 2011. Wambui was at the event in her capacity as an alumnus and Bob was there representing Safaricom Foundation in the fundraising. The two met and they were cupid struck.

After dating for three years, on Saturday 2nd April 2016 Safaricom CEO Mr. Collymore finally said YES I DO  in a colorful ceremony  held at Kitisuru.

The two had dated for three years and their flashy wedding ceremony saw top corporate CEOs in attendance.

 Family

The details known about Bob Collymore family is that of his mother and grandmother. Nonetheless, he now has a wife and two daughters that his wife got from her first marriage with a man called Joseph Kinyua.

Wambui Kamiru had been married to Joseph Kinyua in 2007 and blessed with two twin daughters.

Wambui Kamiru Divorce with Joseph Kinyua

Wambui abandoned her husband and then filed for divorce accusing her husband of domestic violence through her veteran family lawyer Judy Thongori.

In a quick rejoinder, her husband also filed another divorce suit accusing her of infidelity. Bob Collymore was named as a respondent in the divorce case but he claimed through his lawyer that he met Wambui when she was already divorced.

The divorce case proceedings were never made public by the mainstream media but it seems the case was amicably settled because now Wambui Wamae Kamiru and Bob Collymore are happily married.

Bob Collymore Wealth

Bob Collymore has revealed that Safaricom pays him a total amount of ksh 10million ($100,000) per month. He has properties worth ksh277 million ($2.7 million).

Bob states that he accumulates Ksh. 109.5 million in one year including interests and dividends.

According to a declaration of wealth he posted, he has a net worth of Sh277.3 million in cash, properties, and shares.

Collymore owns a kSh54 million residential house in London, cash balances in local banks worth USD203,000 (about Ksh20,300,000) and has Sh18.4 million worth of shares in Safaricom and Vodafone PLC shares worth USD871,000 (about Ksh88,000,000) and his financial balances have a sum of Ksh95.4 million in real money

Bob Collymore Citizenship

Bob Collymore is both British and Kenyan, the latter being by virtue of being married to a Kenyan woman,

Bob Collymore Photos

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

Bob Collymore - Biography, Marriage, Wambui Kamiru, Divorce, Joseph Kinyua, Photos, Family, children, Safaricom, Working Career, Citizenship, Wealth

 

 

Bob Collymore Health

While being interviewed by Jeff Koinange a few months ago, Collymore revealed that he had been battling with cancer. He had to seek treatment in the UK where he stayed for at least 9 moths before returning to Kenya.

VIDEO: Bob Collymore opens up about his health

 

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Africa

Conversion of Kenyan currency suspended in Uganda

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The governor visited Dr Ruto at his office at Harambee Annex, Nairobi to deliver the serial number 2 currency notes. Serial number 1 was given to President Uhuru Kenyatta on June 1, 2019, during Madaraka Day celebration. PHOTO | DPPS

Uganda has joined Tanzania in suspending the conversion of Kenyan Shillings as a measure to tame illicit cash flows.

In a statement issued on Monday, Bank of Uganda said it had been informed by the Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) that they have issued new banknotes effective May 31, 2019.

“Bank of Uganda will not accept Kenya Shillings at its counters with immediate effect,” Bank of Uganda said in a statement.

“Please be advised that changing Kenyan currency from old to new banknotes can only be done in Kenya,” the statement further read.

COUNTERFEITS

On Friday the Bank of Tanzania also suspended conversion of Kenyan currency to Tanzanian currency.

According to Tanzanian financial institution, they were advised to freeze the exercise by Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) in a move to tame illicit cash flows.

“With a view to combat illicit financial flows and counterfeits into the Republic of Kenya, the Bank of Tanzania has been advised to freeze CBK Currency Collection Account with immediate effect,’’ the statement read in part.

Source:nairobinews

READ ALSO:   Bob Collymore’s contract extended by another year despite calls he be replaced by a Kenyan
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Meet Kenyan Beauties and Brains in the US: Vote now for Miss Kenya USA [PHOTOS]

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BY BMJ MURIITHI

Voting is now open for Miss Kenya USA pageant as the clock ticks towards the much awaited colorful gala event set to take place on July 6th 2019 in Renton, Washington.

The Miss Kenya USA Organization’s objective is to empower young Kenyan women here in the United States through engaging them in events and programs that will enhance their educational background as well as growth within the Diaspora through philanthropic work.

VISION

The pageant’s ultimate vision is to allow each young lady that is participating in the pageant to have an avenue where they can express themselves freely while exercising their goals towards development. It also hopes to mold these young women to be leaders of tomorrow, by helping them adapt to roles and programs that will utilize their skills to their maximum potential.

Remember you can vote for your contestants daily: YOU CAN VOTE HERE ANY TIME

The Pageant was the brainchild of Mr. Michael a.k.a “Frakaz” Bisonga, under the Frakaz Entertainment Group based in Houston, TX. The Pageant was always hosted in Houston over the Memorial Weekend in 2006 saw the first actual pageant take place.

“Our ultimate goal is to impact one girl child at a time that will in turn produce a ripple effect within our community of development and self sufficiency,” says the founder.

We hope to link each one of the contestants with an organization that is already working at social and/or developmental issues in Kenya as well as here in the USA; to further the purpose of their platforms. Lastly we shall encourage these young women to market and be the best goodwill ambassadors for Kenya in the Diaspora. These women shall execute but not limited to the following expectations:

  • Organization Ambassadors
  • Community Development and leadership
  • Good stewardship
  • Pageant Platform Driven
  • Accomplish set Goals
  • Share their success stories to motivate others

She adds.

YOU CAN VOTE HERE ANY TIME

Here are the beauties and their bios:

CAROLYNE NGANGA

My names are Carolyne Nganga. Currently, I am located in Washington DC and I am pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Nursing. Nursing was and still is a career path I knew I wanted to pursue since I was 13 years old back in Kenya, because of financial constraints, I did not get a chance to pursue the career on completion of my high school education. Just to back up, I dropped out of high school due to lack of school fees and was out of school for 2 years. During this time, I got an opportunity to work as a waitress (at the age of 15) in a family owned restaurant in Nairobi. Right before
my 18th Birthday, I had enough savings to go back to high school and I proceeded. Working as a young teen exposed me to real struggles a lower class Kenyan face every day, struggles faced by young people due to lack of an Opportunity to pursue education and challenges of working teens. The experience built my character and thrust me towards desiring more not only to better my life but that of our community.

My platform, something I have yearned for a long period now is 1st education (every child matters, is my theme) 2nd is working towards curbing child-maternal mortality and lastly preventive care (teaching the community about all modifiable risk factors in an effort to reduce or better, prevent certain illness that have plagued our Community today for instance Hypertension, diabetes and stroke) I plan to use my skills in combination with high healthcare technology am exposed to here in the US to
instigate change in healthcare system in Kenya especially in rural areas.

My voluntary experiences include free clinics within the DC, Virginia and Maryland area, feeding the homeless in DC, support of several causes for instance runway for cure cancer awareness. I am excited to be part of this pageant because I believe the experience I will get will guide me into my Platforms.

CYNDEE MULINGE

YOU CAN VOTE HERE ANY TIME

My name is Cyndee Mulinge, and I was born in Kajiado and raised in Nairobi, Kenya. I am a graduate of Central Washington University with a Bachelor’s in Social Service and Psychology. Zealous in expressing my love for Kenyan culture while here in America, I work as an assistant for the African Print Takeover, a movement which brings African culture to the Northwest through fashion. Also, passionate to give back to the community, I regularly volunteer for various non-profit organizations such as Cry Out (an after-school program using music, dance, and creativity to empower youth to lead, pursue justice for themselves and others oppressed in their communities) and Mary’s Place, an organization which helps Seattle’s homeless by providing shelter.

READ ALSO:   Safaricom staff charged with attempting to defraud firm of Sh300m

I love giving back to my community! In continually doing so, I noticed a lack of follow through after organizations donate to children’s homes. How often does one check in after giving to see what else is needed? Thus, my Miss Kenya USA 2019 platform is charitable giving through Reach A Life Foundation. For the past year, I have partnered with the Nairobi-based “Reach A Life Foundation” to emphasize follow through by providing food, clothing, and tuition for orphans in various children’s homes. There is a sense of belonging when you know you have people who are looking out for you, who cares and supports you.  It is essential for us to show these orphanages that we are here, and willing to provide them with life’s basic needs and assist them with their major needs.

R.A.L.F has successfully provided support to 11 children’s homes, amongst them: A home specifically for children with disabilities, and another with children who are HIV+. My goal is to use my title as Miss Kenya USA 2019 to inspire my community, to further my education, and to aid R.A.L.F in expanding their reach to even more children homes in need. It would be an honor to be your Miss. Kenya USA 2019!

Do as well as you can, with what you have.

HELLEN KAMAU

Hellen Kamau is a Kenyan native who currently resides in Birmingham, AL. She is a graduate from Auburn University in Auburn, AL and an incoming student at Samford University’s, McWorter School of Pharmacy in Birmingham, AL. In addition to these studies, she is also getting her master’s degree in Public Health. Her heart is for her community and that is where she desires to begin touching lives.
The journey to achieve a doctorate degree will expand what she’s been longing for in improving her community and the future healthcare systems in Kenya. Giving back in the area of healthcare is the mountain she stands on.
She is also associated with other organizations such as the National African Student Association(NAFSA), BLAQK EMPIRE, and Off the Block Kids Athletics, which is based in Kenya. NAFSA educates and guides students by helping them make a smooth ransition to getting jobs, lowering student loans, and to tackling obstacles faced while progressing into the work field.
BLAQK EMPIRE’s core values are grounded on empathy, gratitude and ambition. It’s main goal is to empower each of us to be better, to love ourselves and others while changing each community at a time. And lastly, Off the Block Kids Athletics is an organization based in Kenya that she has had an opportunity to be an ambassador of for the past 3 years. This organization works to get children involved, active and healthy through athletics. She has helped raise funds that have allowed the children to enjoy activities such as track and field, and providing the proper equipment. Through this organization they have been able to educate young children about their health, eating habits, and how to take care of there bodies at an early age. This organization aides in keeping children out of the streets, while helping them achieve their dreams and allowing a safe and fun place for children to simply be children.
All of these organizations stand for pride, unity and love. This candidate defines her future and the future of her beloved country by simply being our best versions. Miss Kenya USA gives a push to magnify what’s been simplified.

WENDY ODUOR

Mahatma Gandhi once said “Be the change that you wish to see in the World”, a statement Wendy Oduor desires to embody in her generation.

READ ALSO:   Safaricom net profit hits Sh63.4bn

As a fashionista, host and speaker, the recent graduate from Parsons School of Design in New York City believes that it is time to rise and champion the cause and solutions for mental health awareness.

Mental health remains a silent epidemic affecting millions of Kenyans. The lax mentality and approach as a nation towards mental health has instead oppressed those living with (knowing or unknowingly) and affected by various psychological diagnosis rather than leading them to a road of freedom and recovery.

After tragically losing her brother to suicide in 2014, Wendy, like many others, retrieved to silence. Wendy eventually understood that pain can birth purpose when allowed. This helped Wendy to begin sharing about her experience as a guest speaker at social events and utilizing social media to create awareness and a safe space where people break their silence and are encouraged to seek professional help. Wendy reaches over 100 people when hosting her weekly Mental Health Monday live on Instagram. In addition to creating awareness in the diaspora, Wendy also made it her mission to visit a mental health institution in Kenya to begin building relationships, understanding the logistics of the Kenyan health care system and gain first hand insight from Kenyan health professionals to see how to successfully combat Mental Health in Kenya, as a long term goal.

Wendy Oduor is embarking on the Miss Kenya USA pageant with a mission to promote mental health awareness across the diaspora and Kenya through education and action. This mission will entail dismantling countless generational errors in how Kenyans have dealt with matters affecting the mind, through constant conversations and teachings about mental health using but not limited to online platforms, schools, churches, and public events. The latter step which is about action, include result geared action plans put together by societal members alongside mental health care professionals to successfully guide individuals to their breakthroughs in the hopes to end the silent epidemic of mental health.

NEEMA NYAMBURA KIMARU

Age: 23 (soon to be 24)

Education: In 2017 I received my Bachelors Degree in Communication Studies and Marketing at Meredith College. Meredith is an all women’s liberal arts college in Raleigh, NC. After receiving my degree I traveled to work abroad in Asia for a year and a half as an English teacher! I have recently relocated back to the USA permanently and am currently working as a Communication Specialist in the Triangle Area.

Platform: Inclusion and Education for First Generation Kenyan American Youth

This cause is so near and dear to me because in so many ways it stems from how I have come to define myself and my own identity as a Kenyan American. I see a very great need in our diaspora community to include and educate our youth about where they come from. Especially as more and more Kenyans settle here in the States and have families, it’s apparent that their children are sometimes clueless about what it means to be Kenyan or even worse, they don’t care. Many don’t even know how to speak Kiswahili and definitely not their tribal language. I know this is an issue that has been prevalent in our communities for quite some time because I and my fellow Kenyan American peers were (and still are) this way!

Here is a little bit of background about me. I have always been proud to be a Kenyan and always maintained that I grew up in a true Kenyan home for the most part. Everything from the food we ate, the church we attended, and the family oriented priorities we held contributed to that. I was also very fortunate to grow up in an active Kenyan Community and to have traveled to Kenya often growing up. Through all of this I did learn a lot about Kenya historically, culturally, and also about my own families personal history. However, English is my first language and we always spoke English at home. My parents and extended family always struggled to try to teach me Kiswahili and Kikuyu. As I have gotten older I have taken it upon myself to learn. I still struggle to speak and overcome shyness of speaking, but I can understand about 50% while listening to a conversation so I have improved quite a bit! My goal this year is to become conversational by years end.

READ ALSO:   Collymore to leave office as row erupts over successor

Many first generation children and young adults are in the same situation as me and it does make me very sad. Even though there is still a lot for me to learn, I am a big advocate for this cause and I feel that if we come together as a community we can find a way, many ways actually, to better include and educate our youth. Other nationalities have done wonders in this department so I am currently studying their methods. My dream is to operate a non profit dedicated to this cause! Should I win or place at all in the Miss Kenya USA pageant this year my winnings will go towards this endeavor.

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Africa

NBA Star Dirk Nowitzki and his Kenyan wife Begin Process of Becoming US Citizens

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Dirk Nowitzki and his wife Jessica Olsson have started the immigration process that will eventually have home become United States citizen, the just-retire NBA star recently said.

Speaking to Dallas Morning News, Nowitzki, a German citizen who played his entire 21-year NBA career for the Dallas Mavericks, says he and his wife Jessica are in the process of getting green cards, hoping to eventually become US citizens in five years.

“We’re in the process of getting a green card. So once we accomplish that, then you have to be a green-card holder for, I think, over five years before you can even think about doing that [becoming a U.S. citizen]. So we’re going to do that and see how it goes. But obviously our kids were born here and they all have U.S. passports and the wifey and I have been on a visa for the last few years,” Nowitzki told Dallas Morning News.

Nowitzki announced his retirement from playing professional basketball at the end of the 2019 season.

Jessica Olsson is a Swedish citizen – her dad is Swedish while her mother was born in Kenya. The two wed in Nanyuki, Kenya in 2012. They have three children.

Source: Mwakilishi.com

READ ALSO:   Safaricom best employer in Africa
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