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GOOD NEWS: Here is how to retrieve your Green Card confirmation number in case you lost it

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In Case you forgot or lost your confirmation number and therefore are unable to check whether you won following the release of the winners of 2020 Diversity visa Lottery, don’t lose hope. You can retrieve it.  Read: Check if you won the Green Card Lottery here.

The entrant status check website offers an option to retrieve a confirmation number. To retrieve a confirmation number, the primary entrant will need to provide the Diversity Visa Lottery Program year, last/family name, first name, middle name (if any), date of birth, and the email address used to register for the lottery. Here is the link to retrieve the confirmation number.

If you have your confirmation number, you can enter it along with your last name and year of birth at this link.

Results of the 2020 Diversity Visa Program (US Green Card Lottery) became available online starting May 7th.

Those who participated in the lottery during the open registration period (October 3rd, 2018 to November 6th, 2018) have until September 30, 2020 to check whether they won the lottery at the State Department website.

The online portal requires individuals to enter the confirmation number they were provided with when they applied, along with their last name and year of birth.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Kenyan Woman tried to rob a bank in Texas, use baby as a shield - Police

Source: Mwakilishi.com

 

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Waititu mum on alleged family’s hand in Kiambu graft probe

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Besieged Kiambu Governor Ferdinand Waititu has left the public guessing on the alleged involvement of his family members in theft of millions of shillings from the county coffers.

The governor, who is accused of presiding over the alleged loss of close to Sh600 million, has neither denied nor admitted claims that his daughters did business with the county.

The Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) has accused him of conflict of interest after it emerged that some of his relatives got tenders.

“Preliminary investigations show that contractors paid monies to senior county officials, their companies or relatives through proxies,” the statement reads in part.

But in an interview with the Nation on Thursday evening after his release from police custody, Mr Waititu said “anybody is free do business with the county government of Kiambu”.

“I want to state clearly that any Kenyan has a right to do business with the county government of Kiambu so long as he or she is qualified,” he said without elaborating further.

Unconfirmed reports had said that one of Mr Waititu’s daughters was among the 15 people being targeted in the ongoing investigations by the EACC detectives.

The outspoken governor, popularly known as Baba Yao, is also being investigated over alleged corruption in a number of his county programmes, including ‘Kaa Sober’, which was aimed at rehabilitating alcoholics.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: How a Kenyan boy raised by a single mom rose to earn a Masters in Nuclear Medicine #DIASPORASTORIES

The initiative was said to have gobbled close to Sh700 million before it was terminated.

His arrest on Thursday came hours after the Kiambu County Assembly rushed and passed a supplementary budget in which it approved an expenditure of Sh722 million under the controversial programme.

The approval of the budget was widely seen as a scheme to regularise the controversial expenditure in which millions of shillings are suspected to have been stolen.

Mr Waititu was released after being granted Sh500,000 anticipatory bail.

Kiambu Principal Magistrate Brian Khaemba ordered the governor to present himself alongside his lawyers to a police station.

source:nation.co.ke

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VIDEO: Machakos First Lady ‘Tetema’ dance moves leave Kenyans asking for more

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Machakos County First Lady Lilian Ng’ang’a has excited the online community after showing off her dancing skills during a meeting with students.

Lilian, dressed in a flowered green dress, put her best foot forward as she jammed to Tanzanian bongo star Rayvanny’s hit song ‘Tetema’.

In her speech, she urged the students to embrace their talents in addition to fulfilling their academic dreams.

The online community had a lot to say about her dancing skills, with a section expressing their disappointment for her underwhelming dance moves.

“NTV do you even know what dancing is, this is like a pliers fitted in a trouser, very rigid and dry,” said Killy Emmanuel.

“Leave alone mutua thing. The mama in black skirt is doing the real tetema,” wrote Innocent Favoured Nzola.

“The only thing ina tetema hapo ni salary Na allowances,” commented Abdul Aziz Mohammed.

“Sijaona mtu anadance hapo labda anafanya mashoweshi,” stated patience Ashley.

“Am not a good dancer but I can do better than this,” added Ann Karanu.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan men in US form "Maendeleo ya Wanaume" network group
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University education isn’t everything: 12 lessons from Bob Collymore, Safaricom CEO

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Robert 'Bob' Collymore

Robert ‘Bob’ Collymore may not have a college education but he is at the helm of Safaricom, a company that is arguably one of Africa’s finest and a trend setter in the world of communications.

1. University education isn’t everything

There tends to be a lot of reliance on paper qualification. We stuff ourselves into universities, then we come out and there is very little difference between us and all the other people who also did the same.

In this industry and many others, if you are not a learning treadmill, you will be left behind very rapidly. The advances that we are seeing in technology such as in artificial intelligence, robotics – I do not have to go to school to learn about it.

I can learn about it because the resources are there. I can buy a book on Amazon in two clicks.

So get into continuous learning instead of relying on the old things you learnt in university – things have moved on.

2. Be adaptable

I have done many different types of jobs but I never anticipated that I would become the CEO of a mobile phone company in Africa.

Just because you went to university and studied law doesn’t mean you become a lawyer.

You need to go into the world knowing that what you learnt in the university was how to learn. You must be adaptive.

3. There is no shortcut

Millennials believe that once you get employed, it will take you a matter of weeks before you get the corner office and get the land cruiser.

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: How a Kenyan boy raised by a single mom rose to earn a Masters in Nuclear Medicine #DIASPORASTORIES

We forget that in all ages, especially in this one, everything takes time. Whether you want to become a basketball player or a CEO, you have to put the hours in.

You do not become a good photographer if you do not do 20,000 hours behind that camera. Shortcuts tend to lead people to a lot of problems, often legal problems.

My earnings are not a secret to Kenyans, but you can see that I am not hugely wealthy, compared to other people.

But do I consider myself a failure? Of course not. I do not want to find a shortcut to riches because they are not the goal. Unfortunately, a lot of people think there is a shortcut to it. You have to work hard.

4. Be hungry

Grab opportunities. Opportunities sometimes present themselves only once and you have to grab them.

Because at later stages, what you regret is not the things you did, but the things you did not do. All my regrets are of things I did not do.

Luck also has a big role to play, so again, don’t sniff at luck. When luck presents itself, just take it. When you get a good fortune, just take it.

5. Learn the art of gratitude

We tend not to be grateful these days. Be grateful for what you have. If you wrote down the things that you are grateful for, you would be amazed.

Grateful people are much more agreeable than people who grow up thinking about how they did not get a break.

If I look at my own background, coming from a broken family, a single mother, being the only black kid in the school that I went to in the UK, not going to university – there is a whole lot of things that I can stack up and say are all the reasons I should not be doing the job I am today.

READ ALSO:   Check here: Green card results are out

If I had let them hold me back, I would still be working in a shop like I used to.

6. Lose the sense of entitlement

I never had the sense that I could not work in the shops because I had completed my A-levels. I was a delivery chap delivering furniture, I used to stack shelves – I never imagined I was too good for any job.

I did a lot of things and I said, “It’s a job. I will do it and I will take my lessons from each and every one of those jobs.”

If you look at how I engage with people working in shops when I go shopping, my interaction with them is shaped by that experience because I walked in those shoes. I worked behind that checkout. I know how dehumanising people can treat you sometimes.

I hold those people with huge admiration and respect. Don’t have a sense of entitlement. You are never too good for anything.

You are never too good to sweep floors and all. That is the thing about opportunities. They may not present themselves as you expect them to.

7. Move with the times

We are in the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, where we are looking at the internet for everything. The fourth industrial revolution plays to older people because it makes things easier for us.

READ ALSO:   Kenyan men in US form "Maendeleo ya Wanaume" network group

However, it does not play to young people because it will definitely take away jobs. In Africa, we need to create about a million jobs every month, which is about 10 to 15 million jobs every year.

That is a huge number. Even here in Kenya, I estimate that we need to create about 3,000 jobs a day.

That’s a scary thought and it is because that’s how fast the population is growing.

Foxconn, the people who make the iPhone, reduced their workforce by half because of robotics.

In Africa, we have a narrow opportunity to take some of the manufacturing from China, but that opportunity is not going to be there for long. We should be grabbing those opportunities now.

What we are seeing is that the people grabbing those opportunities are from places like Vietnam, so if we do not grab them now, by the time we come around we will be out of the game.

8. Are your skills important in today’s world?

Get to the front of the curve. Read. I always tell my team, “I mustn’t know more about stuff than you. You have to be smarter than me.

If you aren’t smarter than me, then why would I need to hire you?” You need to stay ahead of the curve and there is no excuse for not doing it because everything is online these days. You need to ensure that you are skilled to do the jobs that exist today.

source:SDE

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