Connect with us

News

Obesity rising faster in rural areas globally

Published

on

Obesity worldwide is increasing more quickly in rural areas than in cities, a study reported Wednesday, challenging a long-held assumption that the global epidemic of excess weight is mainly an urban problem.

Data covering 200 countries and territories compiled by more than 1,000 researchers showed an average gain of roughly five to six kilos per woman and man living in the countryside from 1985 to 2017.

City-dwelling women and men, however, put on 38 and 24 percent less, respectively, than their rural counterparts over the same period, according to the findings, published in Nature.

“The results of this massive global study overturn commonly held perceptions that more people living in cities is the main cause of the global rise in obesity,” said senior author Majid Ezzati, a professor at Imperial College London’s School of Public Health.

“This means that we need to rethink how we tackle this global health problem.”

The main exception to the trend was sub-Saharan Africa, where women gained weight more rapidly in cities.

Obesity has emerged as a global health epidemic, driving rising rates of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and a host of cancers.

The annual cost of treating related health impacts could top a trillion dollars by 2025, the World Obesity Federation estimated in 2017.

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study

To date, most national and international policies to curb excess body weight have focused on cities, including public messaging, the redesign of urban spaces to encourage walking, and subsidised sports facilities.

To factor health status into the comparison across nations, the researchers used a standard measure known as the “body-mass index”, or BMI, based on height and weight.

A person with a BMI of 25 or more is considered overweight, while 30 or higher is obese. A healthy BMI ranges from 18.5 to 24.9.

Approximately two billion adults in the world are overweight, nearly a third of them obese. The number of obese people has tripled since 1975.

The study revealed important differences between countries depending on income level.

In high-income nations, for example, the study found that rural BMI were generally already higher in 1985, especially for women.

Lower income and education levels, the high cost and limited availability of healthy foods, dependence on vehicles, the phasing out of manual labour — all of these factors likely contributed to progressive weight gain.

Conversely, urban areas “provide a wealth of opportunities for better nutrition, more physical exercise and recreation, and overall improved health,” Ezzati said.

Around 55 percent of the world’s population live in cities or satellite communities, with that figure set to rise to 68 percent by mid-century, according to the United Nations.

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study

The most urbanised regions in the world are North America (82 percent), Latin America and the Caribbean (81 percent) and Europe (74 percent).

More recently, the proportion of overweight and obese adults in the rural parts of many low- and middle-income countries is also rising more quickly than in cites.

“Rural areas in these countries have begun to resemble urban areas,” Barry Popkin, an expert on global public health at the University of North Carolina, said in a comment, also in Nature.

“Modern food supply is now available in combination with cheap mechanised devices for farming and transport,” he added. “Ultra-processed foods are also becoming part of the diets of poor people.”

At a country level, several findings stand out.

Some of the largest BMI increases from 1985 to 2017 among men were in China, the United States, Bahrain, Peru and the Dominican Republic, adding an average of 8-9 kilos per adult.

Women in Egypt and Honduras added — on average, across urban and rural areas — even more.

Rural women in Bangladesh, and men living in rural Ethiopia, had the lowest average BMI in 1985, at 17.7 and 18.4 respectively, just under the threshold of healthy weight. Both cohorts were well above that threshold by 2017.

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study

The populations — both men and women — in small South Pacific island nations have among the highest BMI levels in the world, often well above 30.

“The NDC Risk Factor Collaboration challenges us to create programmes and policies that are rurally focused to prevent weight gain”, Popkin said.

source:nation.co.ke

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Robbery suspect who injured victim after finding him with just Sh50 charged

Published

on

A suspected robber who injured his victim after he found just Sh50 in his pockets was on Tuesday charged before a Makadara Law Courts with inflicting serious injuries.

Kelvin Nyambera Akama was charged with causing grievous harms to Leonard Okochi Omina in Kamulu area of Njiru Sub County in Nairobi on October 21.

Omina was heading home with a friend only identified as Kizito at around 8pm when they were accosted by Akama along a footpath.

The suspect demanded money violently and Kizito gave Sh50 which is all he had. Akama picked it unwillingly claiming it was too little.

Akama then allegedly hit Kizito with a wooden bar sending him sprawling on the ground.

The suspected is accused of striking Omina several times with the timber as he attempted to rescue his friend.

The two were rescued by members of public who caught the suspect in the act.

Akama denied the charges before senior principal magistrate Angelo Kithinji.

He was freed on a bond of Sh200,000 with two sureties of similar amount or an alternative cash bail of Sh100,000.

By NN

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study
Continue Reading

News

Census officials protest over pay

Published

on

Officials who took part in the August 2019 national population census in Uasin Gishu and Kakamega counties took to the streets on Tuesday to demand their pay.

They said they are yet to be paid three months after the national exercise.

Speaking to journalists in Eldoret town, the officials, who included the ICT supervisors, content supervisors and enumerators, disclosed that their

counterparts in neighbouring counties have already been paid. The same sentiments were expressed by those from Kakamega .

“Machakos, Nandi, Elgeyo-Markwet and Nairobi counties have already paid all the officials who took part in the census. But look at us here in Uasin Gishu county. We are being taken round. No one is giving us any concrete communication on the payment. It is almost three months now,” said Amos Kiprono, who was a content supervisor.

“We were trained here in Uasin Gishu for the exercise. But when we try to ask the officer in charge of KNBS about our pay he is telling us to go to Nairobi. We are confused,” said Mr Kiprono.

“The enumerators who were working under me have been pestering me. We were promised to get our pay two weeks after the exercise. What we now want is to be told who is paying us, Nairobi county or Uasin Gishu county? And when are they paying us?” added Mr Kiprono.

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study

Ibrahim Musa, who said he was an enumerator in Turbo Sub-County, accused the authorities responsible for their payments of frustrating them.

He said they gave the exercise all the seriousness it required but it is unfortunate that they are now being taken in circles when it comes to payment.

“The whole exercise was so demanding. We worked up to late hours. As youth who took part in the exercise we are frustrated, we deserve better. We rightfully deserve to be paid for the work done,” said Mr Ibrahim.

The officials gave the authorities responsible for their pay three days to pay them, failure to which they have vowed to continue with their demonstrations.

In Kakamega, about 100 supervisors and clerks who conducted the census also protested over the delayed payments, saying they were promised that they would receive their payments by October 12 but no money had been credited to their bank accounts by then, prompting them to take to the streets.

They accused the County Statistics Officer Thomas Odhiambo of not responding to their enquiries about the matter.

Mr Gerald Nandwa said the county statistics boss has been making promises that they would be paid but that has not happened.

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study

He added that Mr Odhiambo had told them that the list of names of supervisors and clerks was being verified by his office before payment is made.

Administration Police officers at the county statistics office blocked journalists who sought to interview Mr Odhiambo, who was in his office at the time of the protests.

Mr Odhiambo later invited Mr Nandwa and six of his colleagues for a meeting in his office but he declined to speak to journalists who had camped outside.

by nation.co.ke

Continue Reading

News

Policeman found dead inside his house hours after leaving work

Published

on

The body of a policeman attached to Ogembo police station in Ogembo, Kisii County was on Tuesday morning found in his rented house.

Confirming the incident, Kisii County Police Commander Martin Kibet, said the officer had complained of chest pains before going home on Monday around 3pm after his duty.

According to Kibet, the Officer Commanding Station (OCS) at Ogembo police station became suspicious when the deceased failed to report to work on Tuesday morning.

His colleagues were dispatched to the officer’s house when he failed to answer phone calls.

When the officers found the door locked from inside, they knocked it down and found their colleague laying dead on his bed.

Some painkillers were also found on the scene, an indication that the deceased may have purchased them from a pharmacy to ease the chest pains he had complained of.

The police are now waiting for the autopsy report to know the cause of the officer’s death.

by NN

READ ALSO:   Half the number of ICU patients in public hospitals die: Study
Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!