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REVEALED: ‘Silent’ MPs who have never spoken in Parliament

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Despite drawing millions of shillings in salary and allowances, 10 MPs have never spoken on the floor of Parliament, according to Hansard reports.

In a new report that focuses on the period between September 2017 and December 2018, 45 MPs made less than 10 contributions in the plenary despite each one of them having drawn at least Sh16 million in salaries and allowances over that period.

Some of the MPs are seldom seen in Parliament, so much that orderlies often harass them, mistaking them for strangers.

The “silent” MPs are Justus Kizito (ODM, Shinyalu), Oscar Sudi (Jubilee, Kapsaret) James Wamacukuru (Jubilee, Kabete), Alfred Sambu (ANC, Webuye East), Joshua Adama (ODM, Nyakach), Samuel Arama (Jubilee, Nakuru West), Alex Kosgey (Jubilee, Emgwen) and Charles Kamuren (Jubilee, Baringo South). However, Mr Kamuren came late into Parliament after he was elected in a by-election conducted on August 2018.

CONTRIBUTIONS

Five Woman Representatives have also never uttered a word on the floor of the House. These are Anab Mohamed (Garissa), Lilian Tomitom (West Pokot), Irene Kasalu (Kitui), Jane Wanjuki (Embu) and Jane Chebaibai (Elgeyo Marakwet).

Other poor contributors are Safia Sheikh (Marsabit), Amina Hassan (Mandera), Lydia Mizighi (Taita Taveta), Jerusha Momanyi (Nyamira) and Mombasa’s Asha Mohamed who have spoken less than eight times.

MPs who had spoken only five times during the period are Gabriel Mukuha (Githunguri), Shadrack Mose (Kitutu Masaba), John Paul Mwirigi (Igembe South) and Annie Wanjiku (Gatundu North). Samuel Kinuthia (Subukia), Gabriel Tongoyo (Narok West), Patrick Kimani (Thika Town) and Mercy Gakuya (Kasarani) made only four contributions.

Beatrice Kones (Bomet East), Alfred Agoi (Sabatia), Moses Kuria (Gatundu South), Abdi Mude (Lafey), Charles Gimose (Vihiga) and James Lusweti (Kabuchai) have spoken three times while Lemanken Aramat (Narok East), Mathias Nyamabe (Kuria East), Daniel Wanyama (Webuye West), Lokiru Ali (Turkana East) and Ken Okoth (Kibra) only rose twice to speak.

Mr Okoth has been unwell and away in hospital for the better part of the 12th Parliament. Makadara’s George Aladwa and James Mwangi of Tetu have only made one statement on the floor.

SILENT MPs

Senators who rarely speak:

In the Senate, Lamu’s Anwar Loitiptip, Philip Mpaayei (Kajiado), Prengei Victor (nominated), Falhada Dekow (nominated), Christine Gona (nominated), Millicent Omanga (nominated), Mercy Chebeni (nominated), Abdullahi Ibrahim (Wajir), Issa Juma Boy (Kwale) and Gideon Moi (Baringo) rank last in the number of times that they have articulated issues in the House.

“Some of these silent MPs in the House are the most vocal politicians outside,” Caroline Gaita, the Executive Director for Mzalendo Trust, told the Sunday Nation. Mzalendo Trust, which operates the website www.mzalendo.com, is a parliamentary monitoring organisation that has been releasing a scorecard highlighting the performance of MPs since 2014.

According to the organisation’s first scorecard for the 12th Parliament, “ten Members of the National Assembly did not speak at all by December 2018, 96 spoke less than 20 times while three spoke less than 20 times in the Senate. Of the 47 women representatives, 15 also spoke less than 20 times while five did not speak at all.”

Source:Sunday Nation

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Geofrey audi

    June 23, 2019 at 11:41 am

    Some mp’s
    are still learning standing orders of parliament

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Education

Echoes of reggae as Rastafarian admitted to Bar

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When Buju Banton sang the lyrics, “only Rasta can liberate the people,” in his popular 1997 song Hills and Valleys, he did not have in mind the kind of liberation that the Rastafarian community could have years later upon their admission of one of their own to the Bar.

On Friday, Mathenge Mukundi, donning a blue turban set history when he walked to the Supreme Court building where he was admitted to the Bar becoming Kenya’s first advocate of the Rastafarian faith.

“As a diehard human rights and fundamental freedoms enthusiast, I will work towards fighting for the rights of minorities and marginalised groups,” he told the Nation Saturday.

Mr Mukundi did his KCSE in 2012 at Othaya Boys High School before joining Kenyatta University for a law degree.

“According to our policy to give opportunities to diverse members of the society, Mr Mathenge Mukundi, a practicing Rastafarian, did pupillage with us last year and was admitted to the Bar as an advocate yesterday. Congratulations to him,” Kenya’s National Council for Law Reporting tweeted.

Mr Mukundi was admitted alongside 197 new advocates who included Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohamed.

Although CS Mohamed was gazetted in 2013 after finalising her studies at the Kenya School of Law, she was yet to sign the Roll of Advocates, a requirement before one is officially allowed to become one.

Mr Mukundi’s admission to the Bar is historic as most countries including neighbour Uganda do not allow Rastafarians to become advocates.

But liberalism in the conservative law practise is not just growing in Kenya but also other countries. Newly appointed Malawi Attorney-General Chikosa Silungwe was trending on the social media not because of his vast law experience but rather his dreadlocked hair style.

Locally, lawyer Bob Mkhangi also spots deadlocks.

Since independence, Rastafarians have been fighting for their rights.

Rastafari is an Africa-centred religion, which can be traced to Jamaica in the 1930s after Haile Selassie I (1892-1975) — referred to as the king of kings, lord of lords, the conquering lion of the tribe of Judah — was coronated as King of Ethiopia.

Many of their teachings are also developed from the ideas of Jamaican activist Marcus Mosiah Garvey.

But it is only until last year when the courts ruled that Rastafarianism is a religion just like any other and they should be treated as the rest.

Justice Chacha Mwita made the judgement in a case in which a minor was chased away from school in January 2019 for having dreadlocks.

The judge based his ruling on Article 30 (1) of the constitution which states that every person has the right to freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion.

Rastafarians follow biblical teachings found in various books, including Numbers 6: 1-6 and Leviticus 21: 5 – 6, which among others prohibit eating certain foods and cutting of the hair, as a sign of their dedication to God’s teachings.

Consequently, they keep their hair as a manifestation of their faith.

Rastafarians say that they keep “rastas” and not “dreadlocks” arguing that rastas is a sign of faith as opposed to “dreadlocks” which is one’s choice or style.

By Sunday Nation

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Baringo Woman Rep Gladwell Cheruiyot’s husband succumbs to COVID-19

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Baringo woman representative Gladwell Cheruiyot’s husband has succumbed to COVID-19.

Isaac Cherogony breathed his last on the evening of Saturday, July 4, in an Eldoret hospital where he was receiving treatment after developing breathing complications.

The legislator was also tested for the virus and is set to receive her test results soon while their home was sealed off.

At the same time, reports indicate contact tracing is still ongoing.

Gladwell Cheruiyot’s husband

More to follow…

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Lugari MP Ayub Savula arrested in Kakamega

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BY KEVIN KOECH

Lugari Member of Parliament Ayub Savula has been arrested.

The lawmaker was arrested at Sabatia Market in Kakamega County for flouting COVID-19 regulations on public gatherings.

Ayub was fueling his vehicle at a petrol station when police pounced on him and took him to the Mumias Police Station.

The MP was on his way to Nambale, Busia County, for a meeting with leaders allied to ANC leader Musalia Mudavadi and his Ford-Kenya counterpart Moses Wetangula.

More to follow…

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