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How you can move to Canada as Permanent Resident through Foreign Workers Pilot Programme

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Canada has announced it will give permanent residences to temporary foreign workers with experience in the country’s agri-food sector starting 2020.

Experienced, non-seasonal foreign workers with eligible job offers in Canada’s agri-food industry will be retained under the new permanent residence pathway dubbed Agri-Food Immigration Pilot.

The Canadian government said the industry exported a record $66.2 billion in products last year and supports 1 in 8 jobs across the country, but industries such as meat processing and mushroom production “have experienced ongoing difficulty in finding and keeping new employees.”

Currently, foreign workers under Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker program only receive limited-term work permits and have no pathway to permanent residency.

Temporary foreign workers who are eligible for permanent residence under the Agri-Food Immigration Pilot include retail butchers, industrial butchers, food processing laborers, harvesting laborers for year-round mushroom production and greenhouse crop production, and general farm workers.
Others include workers for year-round mushroom production, greenhouse crop production and livestock raising farmworkers, supervisors, and specialized livestock workers for meat processing.

A maximum of 2,750 applicants will be accepted for processing each year under the three-year pilot. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) said the program could welcome about 16,500 new permanent residents, families included, to the country over the course of the pilot’s three-year duration.

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“Temporary foreign workers who come to this country and work hard filling permanent jobs should have a fair and reasonable chance to become a Canadian regardless of the job they are filling,” said Rodger Cuzner, Parliamentary Secretary to Canada’s Minister of Employment, Workforce Development, and Labor.

-Mwakilishi.com

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Doug

    July 28, 2019 at 4:37 pm

    I am a USA citizen with a Chinese (prc) wife ,living in China. Can I apply?

  2. Adam

    July 28, 2019 at 4:45 pm

    Complete bullshit Canadians are not happy

  3. John Simpson

    July 29, 2019 at 4:42 pm

    Stay put……..this story is bullshit.

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Africa

VIDEO: Invest Home, Speakers at 6th Annual Kenya Diaspora Conference Urge the Diaspora

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The 6th Annual Kenya Diaspora Conference 2019 was held at The Ole Sereni Hotel on Mombasa Road.

This unique 3 day event was organized by The Kenya Diaspora Alliance (KDA) together with the Diaspora Investment Club Limited (DICL) and targeted diaspora communities, investors, corporates, professionals, embassies, students, support organizations and service providers among other stakeholders.

Those in attendance joined like-minded Kenyans living and working in and out of Kenya for an opportunity to grow, learn, connect and network.

The 6th Annual Kenya Diaspora Conference 2019 in pictures, here is what went down.

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Diaspora

How a Kenyan man walked into a US Military Base and became a Soldier

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Kenyan born Allan Ngare is living the dream of many green card applicants who have always wished to move to and settle in the United States Of America.

When he applied for Diversity Visa, popularly known as the green card, he did not only land a permanent residence, but also won a slot in the US military.

Now he is poised to acquire US citizenship status.

The US green card which he benefited from, is a lottery Visa program which has seen hundreds of lucky applicants settle in the US.  They acquire  permanent residence which lets them live and work in the US and later apply for naturalization as a path of becoming US Citizens.

Annually, a total of 50,000 slots are usually available for grabs of which tens of Thousands of Kenyans have won for the past years since the program began.

The coveted green card can be applied via Diversity Lottery Program or directly through the US Citizenship and Immigration services with the first being the most preferred.

Successful applicants can easily be granted citizenship after a stay of more than 5 years upon application.

Below are some of the inspiring facts you should know about Allan Ngare, according to youthvillage.co.ke.

  1. Allan Ngare is from Oyugis, a small town in Homabay county, Kenya
  2. He also has a brother who is studying on a full scholarship in US, Martin Ngare
  3. Allan doubles as a truck driver besides his army skills where he drives trucks ferrying Red Cross logistics
  4. He also volunteers with the humanitarian groups
  5. In the US Air force, Alex has not stopped advancing his military and aviation dreams.
  6. Before he was admitted to the US army, he went through a tough exam which he equally did well
  7. How did he join the army?  Surprisingly, he just walked to the military base, talked to the recruiter who later took him through the rest of the process
  8. His status has earned him a paid health insurance and full scholarship, besides he traveled a lot within and outside US
  9. He won the US green card about 5 years ago. He says he had other of his family members living in US
  10. Allan hopes to join in UN missions and work as a humanitarian officer.

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Diaspora

How Kenyans can become US Citizens through service in the military

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If you are serving or have served in the U.S. armed forces and are interested in becoming a U.S. citizen, you may be eligible to apply for naturalization under special provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

If you meet all of the requirements of either section 328 or 329 of the INA, you may apply for naturalization by filing Form N-400 under the section that applies to you.

You will not have to pay any fees for applying for naturalization under INA 328 or 329. As a member or veteran of the U.S. military, certain other naturalization requirements may not apply to you; for example, if you are currently active duty you may not have to reside in or be physically present in the U.S. for any length of time before you apply for naturalization.

The requirements for naturalization are explained in greater detail below:

If you served honorably in the U.S. armed forces for at least one year during a period of peacetime, you may be eligible to apply for naturalization. While some general naturalization requirements apply under INA 328, other requirements may not apply or are reduced. To establish eligibility under INA 328, you must:

  • Have served honorably, during a period of peacetime, in the U.S. armed forces for a period or periods totaling one year;
  • Have submitted a completed Form N-426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service (PDF, 313 KB), at the time of filing the N-400 to demonstrate honorable service;
  • Be a lawful permanent resident at the time of your naturalization interview;
  • Meet certain residence and physical presence requirements;
  • Demonstrate the ability to read, write, and speak English;
  • Demonstrate knowledge of U.S. history and government;
  • Demonstrate good moral character for at least five years before filing your N-400 through the day you naturalize; and
  • Demonstrate an attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution.
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For additional information on eligibility USCIS Policy Manual Volume 12, Part I – Military Members and Their Families.

INA 329 applies to all current military service members or veterans who served honorably in an active-duty status or in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve during any of the designated periods of armed conflict listed below:

  • Sept. 1, 1939 – Dec. 31, 1946
  • June 25, 1950 – July 1, 1955
  • Feb. 28, 1961 – Oct. 15, 1978
  • Aug. 2, 1990 – April 11, 1991
  • Sept. 11, 2001 – present

Many military installations have a designated USCIS liaison to help you with the naturalization application process. These liaisons are typically assigned to the installation’s community service center. Place your request through your chain of command to obtain a certification of your honorable military service on Form N-426, Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service. If you have already separated from the U.S. armed forces, you may submit an uncertified Form N-426 with a photocopy of your DD Form 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty, or NGB Form 22, National Guard Report of Separation and Record of Service, for the applicable periods of service listed in Form N-426. Mail your completed application and all required materials to:

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USCIS
P.O. Box 4446
Chicago, IL 60680-4446

We will review your application and conduct required security checks, which include obtaining your fingerprints. This can be done in one of the following ways:

  • If you were fingerprinted for a previous immigration application, we will use these fingerprints, if available.
  • If stationed abroad, you may submit two properly completed FD-258 fingerprint cards and two passport-style photos taken by the military police or officials with the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. embassy, or U.S. consulate.
  • If you have questions regarding your biometrics, you can contact the Military Help Line at 877-CIS-4MIL (877-247-4645, TTY 800-877-8339) or militaryinfo@uscis.dhs.gov.

NOTE: To help you in the process, USCIS allows you to submit your fingerprints at an application support center before you file your Form N-400. Be sure to include your A-Number and show your unexpired military ID card or Delayed Entry Program ID card.

We will review your application and send it to a USCIS field office to schedule you for an interview. You can request an interview at a specific office in a cover letter attached to your application or leave the choice of location to us.

The field office will schedule your interview to review your eligibility for naturalization and test your knowledge of English and civics. If we find that you are eligible for naturalization, we will inform you of the date you can take the Oath of Allegiance and become a U.S. citizen.

US Passport. PHOTO|FILE

You must complete and submit:

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Generally, individuals who served honorably in the U.S. armed forces and died as a result of injury or disease incurred while serving in an active-duty status during specified periods of military hostilities may be eligible for posthumous citizenship under section 329A of the INA.

You must file Form N-644, Application for Posthumous Citizenship, on behalf of the deceased service member within 2 years of their death. Upon approving the application, we will issue a Certificate of Citizenship in the name of the deceased veteran establishing posthumously that they were a U.S. citizen on the date they died.

Other provisions of the law extend immigration benefits to the service member’s surviving spouse, children, and parents. For information, see the Family Based Survivor Benefits page.

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