Connect with us

News

Census: What you need to know and expect

Published

on

With only three days to the 2019 National Census, many Kenyans in different parts of the country are still unaware on how the exercise will be conducted and the type of questions to expect from enumerators and supervisors.

This will be the sixth population census since Independence and it will be conducted from the night of August 24 to Aug 31, 2019. The previous population censuses were held in 1948, 1962, 1969, 1979, 1989, 1999 and 2009.

The survey being carried out by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) will involve 138,572 enumerators, 22,268 content supervisors and 2,467 ICT supervisors.

Here is an easy-to-understand guide on the census and what to expect.

A population census is the process of counting all people in a country at a specified time. It involves collecting, compiling, evaluating, analysing and publishing demographic, social and economic data pertaining, at a specified time, to all persons in a country or a well-defined part of a country.

  • Why is the census important?

The data collected during census is the primary source of reliable information on the size, distribution of the population in the country, as well as their living conditions and access to basic services at a specified time. The information helps to guide in resource allocation as well as inform planners on policy formulation and targeting of development plans.

READ ALSO:   46 Kabonokia sect members jailed up to one year for evading census

Data from this year’s census will be captured using electronic gadgets such as tablets. It will be different from the 2009 census where data was filled in a piece of paper and this will minimise the amount of time taken in each household. Using the digital mode will ensure privacy, faster processing and data safety.

  • At what time of the day will the census officer call at the household?

Counting of people will start on the night of August 24 and continue up to the August 31 when it is scheduled to end. People will be counted with reference to where they spent the night of August 24. This is known as the Reference Night.

  • How long will it take to complete an interview for a household?

It is expected that enumerators will spend about 30 minutes in each house, though this may be shorter or longer depending on the size of the household.

  • How will I know who the census officers are?

Enumerators will have official identity cards and reflector jackets for ease of identification. Also, they have been recruited from where they live. Therefore, they are known by the locals. Enumerators will also be accompanied by village elders, leaders of residence associations or assistant chiefs who are well known by the heads of households.

READ ALSO:   How one couple’s lavish wedding plans have been ruined by the census

The key questions that will be asked include: age, sex, marital status, births, deaths, migration, forms and severity of difficulties in performing of daily life activities, educational attainment, labour force particulars, access and ownership of ICT equipment and services, crop farming, livestock and aquaculture, housing characteristics, and ownership of assets.

  • Will data on ethnic composition be collected?

Yes. All previous censuses conducted in Kenya have collected data on ethnicity, reflecting a long-standing and continuing widespread demand for information about ethnic and cultural. Characteristics of the Kenyan population.

The supervisors and the enumerators will put a mark of a number at the door step of each house to show that the exercise has been conducted. Families have been urged not to erase the mark till the census is over.

  • What happens if one is not counted on the night of August 24?

Those who shall have not been counted by the end of the census shall be required to report to the local administrative office.

  • Whom do I contact in case my household is not covered?

KNBS will provide a toll-free number that citizens can call so that enumerator is sent to households that shall not have been covered.

  • Will Kenyans in the diaspora be counted?
READ ALSO:   There are 8.2M Kikuyus, 6.8M Luhyas, 6.4M Kalenjins and 5.1M Luos - Census

No. Kenyans in the diaspora will not be counted. However, household members will be asked some questions about members of their households who migrated to other countries in the last 15 years.

  • When will the results be released?

It is expected that preliminary results will be released three months after the end of the exercise. The basic reports of the census are expected to be released within six months, while the detailed analytical reports will be released within one year.

  • If I have visitors on the night of the August 24, will they be counted as part of my household?

Anyone who will be present in your household on the night of 24th/25th August 2019 will be counted together with your household. Everyone will be counted depending on where they will be on the night of 24th/25th August 2019. Those who will be on duty working such as nurses on that night will be counted with his/her household that he/she will return to the following day after work.

by nation.co.ke

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Shock as decomposing body in a sack found in school compound

Published

on

A decomposing body of a woman stashed in a sack was yesterday found at Tumaini Primary School playground in Umoja Estate in Nairobi.

Buruburu OCPD Adamson Bungei said the incident was being treated as murder and investigation have started. He said no identification documents were found at the scene and killers may have capitalised on the ongoing curfew to commit the heinous act.

Locals expressed shock following the horrific discovery and urged the police to bring the killers to book.

Bed sheets, mosquito nets and some clothes stashed in separate sacks were at the scene.

It appeared that the body was thrown over the fence as the area is well fenced and guarded. On the other end, the Amani Court of the Umoja Two estate is guarded round the clock.

Locals said this is the third mystery death in a month.

Tenants in the nearby plot, just metres away from the fence of the school said they have not heard any suspicious movements in the recent past and were only alarmed by the smell from the school prompting them to notify police officers on patrol. The body was later moved to City Mortuary.

By The Standard.co.ke

READ ALSO:   Govt airlifts 100 additional census enumerators to Garissa County
Continue Reading

News

Alex Ndiritu: ‘I had no ill motives on White House post’

Published

on

When 27-year-old Alex Ndiritu (pictured) replied to an online broadcast by CNN about the protests in the United States of America, on Thursday, May 28, 2020, he didn’t expect it would attract the attention of the whole world. The protests from the angry Americans were about the death of an African-American, George Floyd, who is believed to have been murdered by the American police in Minneapolis, USA.

It’s for this reason that the young Ndiritu decided to express his discomfort through an online platform, Twitter. “Burn White House now…we are not turning back…” read his tweet.

But Ndiritu says that he had no ill motives when he was tweeting, and that he was only raising alert to demonstrators that a time has come for all human races to be treated with some dignity.

“It was out of anger, and just the way they took my tweet serious, it’s the same way I expected the American government to respond to George’s murder” he said.

Alex Ndiritu still believes that demonstrations are the only way the governments of today can understand. He says that he is a Pan Africanist, and he will keep fighting for the rights of the black people, and trusts that this could be the end of racism in the world.

READ ALSO:   Census enumerator impresses Kenyans with his creative skills

“When you see people reacting this way, it’s about justice, and it means they are tired of what is happening. So this could probably mark the end of racism in the world” he added. Since Alex tweeted on Thursday, he has received a lot of feedback, both positive and negative. Some have encouraged him to keep on the fight while others have been criticizing him for inciting demonstrators in the USA. Some have even asked him to pull down the post but he is adamant that there is no reason for that.

“I cannot withdraw what I posted because it’s already viral. And even if I withdraw, it will not bring George back to life, what we need right now is to look for a solution to end racism not pressuring me to withdraw my post” he said.

He has also been receiving phone calls and text messages from strange numbers.

This has made him worried about his safety, and has since stopped receiving friend requests on Facebook, but he still hopes that everything is okay.

Moments after Alex tweeted, demonstrators headed to the White house with unknown intentions, something that triggered the US government to deploy police to protect the White house against the protesters. Alex Ndiritu, the man who trended at number one in Kenya for the better part of Saturday, hails from Tetu Sub County in Nyeri County.

READ ALSO:   It’s one year in jail or Sh100k fine if you boycott upcoming census

He says that he is inspired by other pan Africanists like the late Mwalimu Julius Nyerere of Tanzania, Bobi Wine in Uganda and Julius Amalema of South Africa.

Tetu is the same sub county that produced the Kenya’s freedom fighter, Dedan Kimathi and the Nobel prize winner Wangari Mathai.

The determined Alex told The Standard that he is an author having written pathways to Success, a book he says he wrote immediately after his High school education. He is also involved in some community projects like making of interlocking bricks back in the village.

However, he noted that Kenya also needs revolution, saying that there are things that happen in this country that should not be happening. “We are going to address some of the issues happening in Kenya in a better way until we get a solution, we want people to understand the importance of humanity” he said.

By The Standard

Continue Reading

Business

Foreign students rethink US business schools

Published

on

This summer, dozens of incoming students at New York’s Columbia Business School had planned to sail around the coast of Croatia for a week to get to know each other.

Instead, they are chatting online and playing icebreaker games on Zoom. With the coronavirus still spreading, social gatherings like the sailing trip organised by students are on hold, and there is a good chance that when school starts in September, many classes and events will be held online.

Columbia and other elite US business schools like Harvard Business School and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania have said they will likely move to a “hybrid” model of virtual and in-person learning. It is a far cry from the typical MBA experience which features close contact with fellow students, in-person networking events, trips overseas and lunch sessions with CEOs.

The changes have some students reconsidering the value of a degree that can cost upwards of $100,000 (Sh10 million) a year in tuition, housing and other fees.

International students, who make up roughly 35 per cent of the student body at most elite US business schools, are particularly unsure about the decision.

“The virtual environment might take away a chunk of the MBA experience,” said a 27-year-old student from China who was admitted to Wharton and is considering whether to defer for a year.

READ ALSO:   Census enumerator impresses Kenyans with his creative skills

“That’s what a lot of people including myself are thinking through now,” said the student, who declined to be identified because of concerns about his visa status and employment prospects

. Education upended

The United States has been hard hit by the coronavirus outbreak, with more than 1.7 million cases and over 100,000 deaths.

Higher education has been upended with most schools sending students home in the spring and moving classes online. The US hosts over a million international students at its higher education institutions, according to the State Department data.

International candidates account for 36 per cent of people who enroll in full-time US MBA programmes, according to Graduate Management Admission Council, an association of business schools.

If institutions do not resume in-person learning, enrollment, particularly among international students, is likely to take a hit, according to a GMAC survey. Only 43 per cent of the international MBA candidates surveyed said they planned to enroll if programmes begin online. Forty-eight per cent of them indicated they would defer in that scenario.

By Standard Business

Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!