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Kenya to work with US in war against terrorism

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Kenya’s efforts to combat terrorism have received a boost following the partnership of American-based Federal Bureau of Investigation with the Directorate of Criminal Investigations. It has emerged that the FBI is set to establish the first Joint Terrorism Task Force outside the US, to be based in Kenya.

The first team of 42 Kenyan officers is already at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia, where they will undergo training.Directorate of Criminal Investigations Director George Kinoti has hailed the FBI for working with Kenya to fight the war on terrorism.

“I appreciate the effort and resources the FBI and Department of State have dedicated towards improving the capabilities of our officers through training, experience, and insight,” he said.Due to globalisation and the advancement of technology, terrorists and their sympathisers have also changed tactics and devised new methods to further their agenda, said the DCI boss.

The FBI and Department of State announced they had partnered together to assist Kenya in creating the first Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) to be located outside of the US. The initiative to establish the joint task force began after the Al Shabaab terrorist attack on the dusitD2 Hotel in Nairobi, Kenya, on January 16, last year.

READ ALSO:   DCI: I survived 28 bullets, my intestines were on the tarmac, those who picked me up declared me dead

According to a statement from the FBI, there was a pressing need for a multi-agency task force that could be met through FBI’s training expertise combined with the State Department Bureau of Counter-terrorism’s capacity-building efforts.

“The FBI is proud to have the opportunity to work with our Kenyan law enforcement partners on this initiative,” said Assistant Director of the International Operations Division Charles Spencer.

“The first Kenyan JTTF will allow for a sharing of experience, knowledge, and capabilities that will enhance our shared commitment to countering terrorism around the world.”“For over two decades, the CT Bureau has supported Kenya’s efforts to improve its law enforcement capacity to defend its borders and become a counter-terrorism leader in East Africa,” said Ambassador Nathan Sales, the coordinator for counter-terrorism.

“The JTTF for Kenya will support the interagency approach required to successfully investigate and prosecute terrorists before they conduct attacks. I look forward to this unit standing up and the results that will surely come.”

Provide training

The 42 Kenyan investigators will receive a 12-week intensive training at the FBI Academy. The FBI will administer the curriculum and provide training with assistance from other agencies, as applicable, whereas the FBI and the CT Bureau will collaboratively assess the programme.

It is part of a comprehensive programme with Kenya to promote terrorism investigations and prosecutions, enhance crisis response, and strengthen border security.

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By Standard Media

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Kenya Power dismisses 110 staff in one year over fraud

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Kenya Power has over the last one year laid off 110 employees who were found guilty of aiding fraud, illegal connections and other crimes.

Theft is partly to blame for the firm’s financial woes that saw it report a 71 per cent decline in net profit for the half year to December.The firm yesterday said its net profit for the six-month period had sunk to Sh693 million from Sh2.45 billion over a similar period in 2018.

Additional energy charges from new power plants and increased transmission costs also ate into its earnings. Finance costs, which were on the rise the previous year and substantially dented profit, went down by 20 per cent.

The half year numbers came a day after Kenya Power reported a 92 per cent drop in profit for the full year to June 2019 in delayed results attributed to lack of a substantive Auditor General.“Our immediate focus is to improve business performance through the implementation of various initiatives to grow sales, reduce system losses, enhance revenue collection and manage costs,” said Chief Executive Bernard Ngugi in a statement yesterday.

“These initiatives are part of a wider turnaround strategy and are supported by the company’s drive to improve customer satisfaction.”

Mr Ngugi, together with Energy Cabinet Secretary Charles Keter and Directorate of Criminal Investigations boss George Kinoti, had earlier yesterday cracked down on illegal connections in Tassia estate in Nairobi, where he revealed that the firm had axed 100 employees involved in fraud.

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He further warned of more action as the company scales up the fight on crimes that undermine quality power supply.

The operation was carried out jointly by Kenya Power’s security personnel and police officers. “The company will continue to work with security agencies to eliminate illegal power connections and address other crimes that deny Kenyans quality electricity supply,” said Ngugi.

By Standard

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Diaspora

Death Announcement: Leon Ong’ara of St Louis, Missouri

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It is with deep sorrow that we inform you of the passing of Mr. Leon Ong’ara of Saint Louis, Missouri.

Nephew to Agnes Thaiya (Shiro) of St. Louis and Caroline Njeri of Kansas City, Missouri. Leon was 25yrs old and in his final year at Lindenwood University in St. Charles Missouri.

Kindly Let us all join the family for prayers and continue with our financial assistance.

There will be a Memorial Service and a fundraiser on Saturday, February 29 from 1.00 to 3:00 pm at the Archway Memorial Chapel, Hazelwood, MO.

The expenses are at $15,148.

It is our hope that we can raise the funds before Saturday so that we have an opportunity to celebrate Leon’s life that day. Leon’s body accompanied by Shiro and Njeri will leave for Kenya at a later date.

The Saint Louis Kenyan community is requesting for support.

For more information please contact:
Pst.Samuel:  636-219-1101
Pst.Michael Mwangi: 314-398-7040
Agnes Thaiya(CashApp Shiro): 816-694-9097
Zellipah Githui: 314-378-6452 – CashApp

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Immigration News

MUST READ: US Gvt explains what happens to Green Card Holders who take long trips overseas [VIDEO]

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USCIS has announced an update to the USCIS Policy Manual to align USCIS practice with congressional intent and existing regulations by clarifying requirements surrounding naturalization applicants’ absences from the United States. This update concerns absences of more than six months but less than one year during the statutorily required continuous residence period.

This update clarifies the following requirements for naturalization:

  • An applicant who has been absent from the United States for more than six months but less than a year must overcome the presumption that they have broken the continuity of their residence in the United States; and
  • An applicant who has broken the continuity of residence in the United States must establish a new period of continuous residence, the length of which depends on the basis for naturalizing.

An applicant filing under the general naturalization provision is not eligible until they have reached the required period of continuous residence as a lawful permanent resident. Under the law, an absence from the United States for more than six months but less than one year during the statutory period triggers a presumption of a break in the continuity of such residence. USCIS adjudicators have always been required to determine whether naturalization applicants have broken their continuous residence when evaluating naturalization applications.

Please see the Policy Alert (PDF, 300 KB) for more information on this update. Visit the Policy Manual for Comment page for more information on stakeholder review and comment.

A. Continuous Residence Requirement

An applicant for naturalization under the general provision[1] must have resided continuously in the United States after his or her lawful permanent resident (LPR) admission for at least 5 years prior to filing the naturalization application and up to the time of naturalization. An applicant must also establish that he or she has resided in the state or service district having jurisdiction over the application for 3 months prior to filing.[2] 

The concept of continuous residence involves the applicant maintaining a permanent dwelling place in the United States over the period of time required by the statute. The residence in question “is the same as that alien’s domicile, or principal actual dwelling place, without regard to the alien’s intent, and the duration of an alien’s residence in a particular location measured from the moment the alien first establishes residence in that location.”[3] Accordingly, the applicant’s residence is generally the applicant’s actual physical location regardless of his or her intentions to claim it as his or her residence.

Certain classes of applicants may be eligible for a reduced period of continuous residence, for constructive continuous residence while outside the United States, or for an exemption from the continuous residence requirement altogether.[4] These classes of applicants include certain military members and certain spouses of U.S. citizens.[5] 

The requirements of “continuous residence” and “physical presence” are interrelated but are different requirements. Each requirement must be satisfied (unless otherwise specified) in order for the applicant to be eligible for naturalization.[6] 

B. Maintenance of Continuous Residence for Lawful Permanent Residents

USCIS will consider the entire period from the LPR admission until the present when determining an applicant’s compliance with the continuous residence requirement.

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An order of removal terminates the applicant’s status as an LPR and therefore disrupts the continuity of residence for purposes of naturalization. However, an applicant who has been readmitted as an LPR after a deferred inspection or by an immigration judge in removal proceedings can satisfy the residence and physical presence requirements in the same manner as any other applicant for naturalization.[7] 

Other examples that may raise a rebuttable presumption that an applicant has abandoned his or her LPR status include cases where there is evidence that the applicant voluntarily claimed nonresident alien status to qualify for special exemptions from income tax liability or fails to file either federal or state income tax returns because he or she considers himself or herself to be a non-resident alien.[8] 

C. Breaks in Continuous Residence

An applicant for naturalization has the burden of establishing that he or she has complied with the continuous residence requirement, if applicable. Generally, there are two ways outlined in the statute in which the continuity of residence can be broken:[9]

  • The applicant is absent from the United States for more than 6 months but less than 1 year; or
  • The applicant is absent from the United States for 1 year or more.

An officer may also review whether an applicant with multiple absences of less than 6 months each will be able to satisfy the continuous residence requirement. In some of these cases, an applicant may not be able to establish that his or her principal actual dwelling place is in the United States or establish residence within the United States for the statutorily required period of time.[10]

An LPR’s lengthy or frequent absences from the U.S. can also result in a denial of naturalization due to abandonment of permanent residence.

An applicant who has an approved Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes (Form N-470) maintains his or her continuous residence in the United States.[11]

1. Absence of More than 6 Months (but Less than 1 Year)

An absence of more than 6 months (more than 180 days) but less than 1 year (less than 365 days) during the period for which continuous residence is required (also called “the statutory period”) is presumed to break the continuity of such residence.[12] This includes any absence that takes place during the statutory period before the applicant files the naturalization application and any absence between the filing of the application and the applicant’s admission to citizenship.[13]

An applicant’s intent is not relevant in determining the location of his or her residence. The length of the period of absence from the United States is the defining factor in determining whether the applicant is presumed to have disrupted the continuity of his or her residence.

However, an applicant may overcome the presumption of a break in the continuity of residence by providing evidence to establish that the applicant did not disrupt the continuity of his or her residence. Such evidence may include, but is not limited to, documentation that during the absence:[14]

  • The applicant did not terminate his or her employment in the United States or obtain employment while abroad;
  • The applicant’s immediate family members remained in the United States; and
  • The applicant retained full access to or continued to own or lease a home in the United States.
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Eligibility After Break in Residence

An applicant who USCIS determines to have broken the continuity of residence must establish a new period of continuous residence in order to become eligible for naturalization.[15] The requisite duration of that period depends on the basis upon which the applicant seeks to naturalize.[16] In general, such an applicant may become eligible and may apply for naturalization at least 6 months before reaching the end of the pertinent statutory period.[17]

Example

An applicant who is subject to a 5-year statutory period for naturalization is absent from the United States for 8 months, returning on August 1, 2018. The applicant has been absent from the United States for more than 6 months but less than 1 year. As such, the applicant must be able to rebut the presumption of a break in the continuity of residence in order to meet the continuous residence requirement for naturalization.

If the applicant is unable to rebut the presumption, he or she must wait until at least 6 months from reaching the 5-year anniversary of the newly established statutory period following the applicant’s return to the United States. In this example, the newly established statutory period began on August 1, 2018, when the applicant returned to the United States. Therefore, the earliest the applicant may re-apply for naturalization is February 1, 2023, which is at least 6 months from the 5-year anniversary of the pertinent statutory period.[18]

2. Absence of 1 Year or More

An absence from the United States for a continuous period of 1 year or more (365 days or more) during the period for which continuous residence is required will automatically break the continuity of residence. This applies whether the absence takes place before or after the applicant files the naturalization application.[19]

Unless an applicant has an approved Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Purposes (Form N-470), USCIS must deny a naturalization application for failure to meet the continuous residence requirement if the applicant has been continuously absent for a period of 1 year or more during the statutory period. Form N-470 preserves residence for LPRs engaged in qualifying employment abroad with the U.S. government, private sector, or a religious organization.[20]

Eligibility after Break in Residence

An applicant applying for naturalization under INA 316 , which requires 5 years of continuous residence, must then wait at least 4 years and 1 day after returning to the United States, to have the requisite continuous residence to apply for naturalization.[21] The statutory period preceding the filing of the application is calculated from the date of filing.

Once 4 years and 1 day have elapsed from the date of the applicant’s return to the United States, the period of absence from the United States that occurred within the past 5 years is now less than 1 year. Since the period of absence is still more than 6 months, an applicant for naturalization in these circumstances must also overcome the presumption of a break in the continuity of residence.[22]

READ ALSO:   DCI: I survived 28 bullets, my intestines were on the tarmac, those who picked me up declared me dead

If the same applicant reapplies for naturalization at least 4 years and 6 months after reestablishing residence in the United States, he or she would not be subject to the presumption of a break in residence because the period of absence immediately preceding the application date is now less than 6 months.[23]

Example

An applicant for naturalization under INA 316 departs the United States on January 1, 2010, and returns January 1, 2011. The applicant has been outside the United States for 1 year and has therefore broken the continuity of his or her residence in the United States. The applicant must wait until at least January 2, 2015 to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period[24] immediately preceding the application will date back to January 2, 2010. At that time, the applicant will have been absent from the United States for more than 6 months, but less than 1 year, during the statutory period and may be eligible for naturalization if she successfully rebuts the presumption that she has broken the continuity of her residence.

If the applicant cannot overcome the presumption of a break in the continuity of his or her residence, the applicant must wait until at least July 1, 2015, to apply for naturalization, when the 5-year statutory period immediately preceding the application will date back to July 1, 2010. During the 5-year period of July 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015, assuming the applicant did not make any additional trips outside the United States that would cause USCIS to presume a break in continuity of residence, the applicant was only absent from the United States between July 1, 2010 and January 1, 2011, a period that is not more than 6 months. Therefore, no presumption of a break in continuous residence applies.

3. Summary

The following table provides a summary of how an applicant’s absence from the United States may impact his or her eligibility to naturalize.

Impact of Absence from the United States During Statutory Period on Naturalization Eligibility
Duration of Absence Must Applicant Overcome Presumption of a Break in the Continuity of Residence? Eligible to Naturalize?
6 months or less No[25] Yes
More than 6 months but less than 1 year Yes Yes
1 year or more (without USCIS approval via N-470 process) Not eligible to apply No

The following table illustrates the length of time needed to re-establish eligibility and residence in the United States following an absence of 1 year or more from the United States.

Filing Under Specific Provisions After Break in Continuous Residence
Provision Absence During Statutory Period May Apply After…
INA 316

5-year statutory period

More than 1 year
  • 4 years and 6 months, or
  • 4 years and 1 day (but must overcome presumption of break in continuity of residence)[26]
INA 319

3-year statutory period

More than 1 year
  • 2 years and 6 months, or
  • 2 years and 1 day (but must overcome presumption of break in continuity of residence)

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