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PHOTOS: Motorist dies after his Mercedes ploughs through trees and burst into flames

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A motorist was on Sunday morning killed after he lost control of his vehicle near Sunshine Secondary School on Lang’ata road and ploughed through several trees.

According to a police report, the vehicle then landed on a perimeter fence where it reportedly burst into flames with the driver trapped inside.

The driver of the said vehicle was reportedly driving from the Mbagathi roundabout towards Lang’ata when the accident occurred at around 7am.

Members of the public at the scene of an accident in which a car ploughed through several trees along Lang’ata road. The driver of the car died in the accident. PHOTO | COURTESY
Members of the public at the scene of an accident in which a car ploughed through several trees along Lang’ata road. The driver of the car died in the accident. PHOTO | COURTESY

“It happened that the said motor vehicle was being driven from Mbagathi roundabout direction towards Lang’ata general direction,” said the police report

The vehicle was extensively damaged and the body of the deceased has since been transferred to the City Mortuary.

The wreckage of a car that ploughed through several trees along Lang’ata road. The driver of the car died in the accident. PHOTO | COURTESY

The wreckage of a car that ploughed through several trees along Lang’ata road being towed from the scene of the accident. PHOTO | COURTESY

By NN

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Prof Mutua rips Itumbi to pieces, says he is barely literate

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Prof Makau Mutua, the SUNY Distinguished Professor at SUNY Buffalo Law School and Chair of KHRC has ripped Dennis Itumbi to pieces. Here is his column;

It doesn’t matter whether it’s in the movies, or in real life. That’s why the recent public sacking — and humiliation in broad daylight — of the one-time Jubilee blue-eyed boy Dennis Itumbi was worth a champagne toast.

Mr Itumbi’s job description in the Presidential Strategic Communications Unit (PSCU) was Orwellian.

Straight out of 1984, the dystopian novel by English writer George Orwell, Mr Itumbi’s improbable title was Director of Digital Innovation and Diaspora Communications at the PSCU. Let that sink in.

The office of the Gang of Five “digital terrorists” was a taxpayer-funded propaganda machine in the Deep State at the apex of power.

They say you should be kind to people on your way up because you will surely meet them on your way down.

This is especially true if your ascent to the top — like Mr Itumbi’s — isn’t based on any discernible qualifications, or experience, except tweeting.

PROPAGANDA MACHINE

In any society based on meritocracy, Mr Itumbi, then barely literate and in his 20s, would’ve been lucky to get a government job as subordinate factotum in a remote, isolated, and windswept provincial outpost.

But no, the precocious fellow started right at the top, next to Jubilee’s Uhuru Kenyatta at State House. There was Mr Itumbi, wet behind the ears, perched at the pinnacle of the state. He quickly got power-drunk.

Let’s be fair to Mr Itumbi and his fellow “keyboard terrorists”. He was baptised with fire.

His remit at first was to delegitimise the International Criminal Court and discredit those who supported the crimes against humanity investigations into Mr Kenyatta and his running mate William Ruto.

There were reports that he assembled a well-oiled army dubbed “36 Bloggers”, whose mandate was to personally destroy the ICC’s proponents.

No other sector of society sought justice for the victims of the 2007 near-genocidal post-election violence than Kenya’s civil society.

CIVIL SOCIETY ONSLAUGHT

I know because the Kenya Human Rights Commission, whose board I chair, was the leading voice for the victims.

Mr Itumbi and his acolytes called civil society “evil society”, a dirty moniker. Mr Itumbi, a proto-fascist, pursued a putschist vendetta against civil society.

His cartel used every state lever to destroy us, the “evil society”. The state carried out frivolous audits against NGOs.

There were several attempts to deregister the KHRC, among other NGOs. Fazul Mahamed, the disgraced former CEO of the NGO Co-ordination Board, led the charge against human rights NGOs on non-existent regulatory violations.

Eventually, the courts turned away the vexatious suits. Mr Itumbi and other state operatives attacked us personally at every turn.

He was vicious, determined, and acted without a conscience. Power went into the young man’s head.

He was untouchable and acted with impunity knowing that he sat in the inner sanctum of power.

RUTO’S SUPPORTER

His hubris finally caught up with him. Mr Itumbi apparently never got the memo.

He backed the wrong horse in the kerfuffle between Mr Ruto and Mr Kenyatta. As the saying goes, even a fool would’ve told him “you dance with the one who brung ya”.

In his case, that would’ve been Kamwana. But instead, Mr Itumbi jumped all in — feet first — into Mr Ruto’s anti-Kenyatta camp.

He left no ambiguity, or nuance, on whose side he was. Often, he would attack Mr Kenyatta on Twitter.

This wasn’t tomfoolery, but pure, unadulterated foolishness. He unequivocally decided his bread was buttered on Mr Ruto’s side.

It proved to be his undoing. No wonder he has been handed his own fanny. Two recent events highlight his ignominious fall from power.

First, he was implicated in the strange Hotel La Mada saga and the purported letter on Mr Ruto’s assassination.

ITUMBI KICKED OUT

The letter sounded like a page out of the book by the boy who cried wolf. Whoever forged it seemed to have aimed at winning Mr Ruto sympathy tears.

The unforced error in Mr Ruto’s camp backfired spectacularly. Mr Itumbi was held for several days in the cooler.

He was left holding the bag because Mr Ruto was helpless to protect his hireling. I suspect, as Mr Kenyatta often says, “simu yangu imezimwa” (my phone is off) — which means old buddies like Mr Itumbi can’t reach him to beg for relief.

The last episode was caught on live TV at the unveiling of the BBI at Bomas. There, Mr Itumbi was captured being frog-marched off the VIP dais just feet away from Mr Kenyatta.

I don’t think his feet even touched the floor as he was thrown out. Mr Ruto, Mr Itumbi’s godfather, sat forlornly alone on stage as Mr Kenyatta and ODM’s Raila Odinga savoured the proceedings amid mirthful banter and uproarious laughter.

I don’t take pleasure in the misfortunes of others, but Mr Itumbi’s ignominious end is poetic justice.

Editor’s note: Mr Itumbi, arraigned in July last year over the fake Ruto assassination letter, denies the charges.

-Nation.co.ke

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Deaf teacher excels in online video making

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When you meet 31-yearold Samwel Buuri Muriithi the first thing you notice is a warm, polished demeanour and ease of manner.

Then an infectious smile and dead silence. He does not respond verbally.

The best he can do is respond in sign language.

This is the life he has lived since he was 10 years old. He was in Class Three then, in a regular school.

Despite being deaf Muriithi is now a music video producer with a stream of hits under his belt.

He uploads them under the YouTube name Deaf Media K.

“I now edit videos on my phone, I get reviews on my phone too. It has made my work easier,” says Muriithi.

But it has not always been like this.

When he woke up one morning, he says, he could not hear properly from his right ear.

What he describes as the fluttering of butterflies obstructed his hearing.

He thought those close to him were whispering. Sadly though, his sense of hearing was failing.

Muriithi later realised that he was developing a hearing problem.

Soon his left ear developed similar complications. Then he lost the sense the hearing.

He comes from a humble background and did not notice his talent early.

Solace in music

“My love for art developed later, after joining a school for the deaf and interacting with various social groups,” he says.

When his mother died in 2007, he found solace in music and art. “They calmed my emotions wherever I was overwhelmed,” he says.

His love for drama, poetry, music and art blossomed at Machakos Teachers Training College.

“Drama was my new love,” he says. In 2018 a friend asked him to help infuse sign language in a Kiswahili song.

“Since sign language is taught in English, we had to translate the song from Kiswahili to English.

It was difficult,” he recalls.

When the new version of the song was released, he says, feedback was overwhelming.

“The audience was impressed.” Uploading videos on YouTube was rife then.

But, uploading substandard quality videos on the platform was frowned upon.

This necessitated learning how to edit high quality videos.

It was a tedious process and he almost gave up. But when he uploaded the debut Kiswahili video on YouTube the feedback was gratifying. This motivated him to continue the pursuit.

Together with a friend he simulated jokes, translated songs and produced short plays.

He was entrusted with editing videos and posting them on YouTube.

To interpret musicians’ messages he either reads lips or relies on people who can hear.

“Another friend who was conversant with video editing joined the team. His appetite for success kept us on track,” he says.

He practised the art studiously until his editing skills improved. Sometimes he browsed the internet to watch tutorials on video editing. “Before I upload a video I give it to a random friend to review.
He critics and flags where I need to make adjustments.
“The reviewer checks the quality of sound, relevance of subtitles and

actions. Such reviews help me to fine-tune the final output,” he says. Supporters applaud his work.

Then there are critics, mostly from the deaf community, who tell him areas to improve in subsequent uploads.

Last year he was the lead actor in the movie The City Girl.

The “opportunity taught me how persons living with disability can use art to change society,” he says.

During production an interpreter was hired to help people with disability understand the director’s commands.

“When shooting we must have the hearing community. We cannot do it alone,” he says.

As a director, how do you know that a video is good for the audience? I ask.

“My intention is to educate the hearing community on sign language and give them a reason to watch by incorporating humour,” he says.

Muriithi is a teacher by profession.

“Teaching does not tickle my fancy. I teach to survive while I act to find fulfilment,” he says.

“Interests of the deaf are not fully represented in the mainstream media. This is the gap I envision to fill.”

Love for arts
BLOSSOMED AT COLLEGE LEVEL

When Samwel Buuri Muriithi woke up one morning he could not hear properly from his right ear.

Soon his left ear developed similar complications. Then he lost the sense of hearing altogether.

When his mother died in 2007, he found solace in music and art.

His love for drama, poetry, music and art blossomed at Machakos Teachers Training College.

By Sunday Nation

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Eldoret landlady on the spot for removing iron sheets from tenant’s house over KSh 500 rent arrears

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An Eldoret landlady is on the spot after she removed iron sheets from the roof of a tenant’s house over KSh 500 rent arrears even as other kind landlords in some counties were waiving rent for their clients due to tough economic conditions worsened by COVID-19 pandemic.

The tenant identified as Elijah Okumu, a bodaboda rider could no longer afford to pay rent due to the dawn to dusk curfew and strict safety measures the government has imposed on boda boda operators to reduce the spread of coronavirus.

Eldoret landlady on the spot for removing iron sheets from tenant's house over KSh 500 rent arrearsElijah Okumu, a boda boda operator in Eldoret, Uasin Gishu county. Photo: KTN News.
Source: UGC

Speaking to KTN News, the operator said he could no longer fend for his family.

“When the landlady came she told me to pay the KSh 500 rent arrears but I told her I did not have cash at the moment. After a few minutes, she sent a fundi who came and removed all the iron sheets leaving us in cold yet we have a young one month-old child,”

“The economy has deteriorated, the most I can get after a long day handwork is KSh 300 out of which I have to buy food, purchase fuel for my motorbike and pay for its loan,”Okumu said.

Eldoret landlady on the spot for removing iron sheets from tenant's house over KSh 500 rent arrearsOkumu’s wife Bosibori was at the house when the incident happened. Photo: KTN News.
Source: UGC

Okumu’s wife Bosibori said the incident happened on Friday, March 3, at night.

“Yesterday as we were asleep, I heard a bang outside as soil particles were dropping down on my baby. I asked my son to go and check what was going on and he confirmed someone was on the roof busy removing the iron sheets,” she said.

Recently, a Nyandarua landlord, on the other hand, excited his tenants after waiving their two months rent in addition to helping them stock food in preparation for a lockdown.

Michael Munene said he was well aware of the harsh reality his tenants were facing as some of them worked in flower farms which have since been closed after the ban on international flights was announced by the government.

By Tuko

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