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Kenyan student’s experience in Italy dorm self-quarantine

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What does it mean to be self-quarantined? This is my experience as Italy enters its second week of a total lockdown.

On March 9, 2020, the government of Italy under Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte imposed a national quarantine, restricting the movement of the population except for necessity, work, and health circumstances, in response to the growing Covid-19 pandemic in the country.

As a result, schools and institutions of higher learning were not spared as the government moved to secure its citizens and deter spread of the virus.

Since the total lockdown, life has really changed both for the citizenry and visitors, especially students from other countries who study in various Italian universities.

Being a student at the University of Rome Tor Vergata studying MA in Global Governance with specialisation in Global Politics, we have been compelled by our university management to strictly follow university schedules online, do assignments and submit them on time.

Buy masks

I must acknowledge that self-quarantine is very expensive because one is required to be stable in economic, health and mental wellbeing aspects.

It is not easy to wake up every day in your four corners dormitory room and spend the whole day and night there.

Before the lockdown this month, on Saturday February 22 at around 6.15 am, my friends and I had travelled to another city in the south of Italy called Naples for one of my friend’s birthday.

We took the risk and went because earlier we had booked for our trip and paid the cost-related expenses. It was not something we wanted to miss despite news that the virus was already spreading in some parts of Italy, especially in the North.

Prior to the trip, we bought masks to keep ourselves safe since we didn’t have a personal car and we were going to use public transport provided by Flix Bus.

Commuters travel in the underground metro in downtown Milan on March 10. Italy imposed unprecedented national restrictions on its 60 million people on March 10 to control spread of coronavirus. AFP

The trip to the South of Italy was almost two hours long and we had a good time without thinking about Covid-19.

I remember vividly that evening after I returned to our student residence, my mum called me to find out how my day was and I told her that my day went well, we travelled to another city and we just got back.

Restrict movements

My mum paused and changed her tone and at that moment, I knew that something was wrong because after the virus was reported to have gotten to most parts of the country, mum had warned me to restrict my movements.

On this particular day, I had not told her of the planned trip because she would have told me to cancel it. I had been looking forward to explore the city because in the past I had not had time to explore the city and I felt that was a good opportunity to do so.

Fast forward, exactly one month since we had the trip to Naples, a friend from Malawi, who is also my course mate, developed some fever and cold.

Her situation threw panic across the campus, and those of us who had

accompanied her to Naples had more reason to be worried. I quickly recommended that she takes some medicine called Tachipirina because it is one of the drugs one can get at the pharmacies without prescription. In Italy, no pharmacy sells medicine without prescription from a doctor.

However, our friend recovered and we started to share our fears of illness.

On March 2, we went shopping in preparation for a possible lockdown. We bought groceries, fruits and dry foods which we have continued to use to date while quarantined.

Some days before the closure of universities I also had some crucial appointments with the immigration office. Then on March 4 mid- morning, the Italian leadership closed all schools and universities from the next day to March 15, and we were asked to stay home.

The lockdown period was later extended to April 3.

In the early days of the lockdown, it’s likely some people got some directives wrong, such as when the university was closed and for many students it was an opportunity to go partying until when the leadership came out strongly to enforce the lockdown.

I am happy to see how people have embraced self-isolation and the mandatory self-quarantine rules.

As of now, we continue to have lectures online. Since I have been indoors for over two weeks now, I have learned new things and clearly know what I would like to do more after the lockdown.

While on quarantine there were two Iranian students that were suspected to have Covid-19 but after check ups at the hospital this was not the case.

We are dealing with a challenging situation, some people are experiencing fear, desperation and anxiety. The sooner we can get Covid-19 under control, then life can begin to return to normal.

Some lessons that Kenya can learn from Italy: The health care sector in Italy was not prepared for the outbreak, the framework that has been in place for many years was not one that could easily expand to cater for the sick people.

Doctors and nurses in Italy are doing their best but if political systems continue to reduce money meant for health care, many countries will always be unprepared to face such kinds of emergencies.

Grace Sabiri Mageka is an MA Global Governance student specialising in Global Politics, at the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy.

IN SUMMARY

• Since the total lockdown, life has really changed both for the Italy citizenry and visitors, especially students from other countries who study in various universities.

• “It is not easy to wake up every day in your four corners dormitory room and spend the whole day and night there” Grace Sabiri Mageka

By People Daily


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Lifestyle

Naisula Lesuuda shares enticing photos of her grand gender reveal party

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Samburu West Member of Parliament (MP) Naisula Lesuuda is slowly counting down the days to when she and her sweet baby will finally meet.

The mother-to-be is more than ready to see the face of the child who will instantly steal her heart.

The leader told her fans she was grateful to God, her family and her husband for making her nine-month journey seamless as she shared photos from her gender reveal party.

Initially, Naiula and her girlfriends planned to throw a grand affair that would be the mother of all celebrations.

Naisula Lesuuda shares enticing photos of her grand gender reveal party

The yummy mummy danced and had some fun. Photo: Naisula Lesuuda
Source: Facebook

But thanks to COVID-19, they had to abort their plans and think of the bigger picture.

Little did she know, that as she silently put the celebration at the back of her head, her pals were busy at work.

They arranged a soiree that was organised and perfectly suited for the hopeful mum.

Naisula Lesuuda shares enticing photos of her grand gender reveal party

What a beauty! Photo: Naisula Lesuuda
Source: Facebook

It had every precaution in place. Sanitisers were available and invited guests made sure they social distanced at arrival.

Everyone avoided too much contact and all Naisula had to do was look pretty and sit comfortably as her people spoiled her rotten and pampered her silly.

She shared photos from the event with her fans and soon enough, congratulatory messages started streaming in.

Naisula Lesuuda shares enticing photos of her grand gender reveal party

Before she changed into her powder pink attire. Photo: Naisula Lesuuda
Source: Facebook

TUKO.co.ke had earlier stated the pretty politician unveiled her pregnancy back in September 2020.

She gave her fans a rare treat after posting a photo of her bump on Facebook.

It was all in a bid to participate in the once viral “three generations” challenge.

Naisula stood between her mother and grandmother as she thanked God for the gift of life and family.

by Tuko.co.ke


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Health

The Rate at Which Kenyan Teens Are Consuming Alcohol is Alarming!

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Even though the Alcoholic Drinks Control Act (2013) clearly states that; “No person holding a licence to manufacture, store or consume alcoholic drinks under this Act shall allow a person under the age of eighteen years to enter or gain access to the area in which the alcoholic drink is manufactured, stored or consumed,” a recent study shows that young people start consuming alcohol between the age 12 – 16 years. A bigger percentage of them receive their first drink from their friends, relatives and even parents.

‘When I look at that chair I see Shanty’ – Shanty’s mum mourns
But who cares? The bar owners need money, and young people want to have fun.

44.9% of them drink on special occasions, 32.9% on school holidays, 6.6% 2-3 times a week, 5.1% daily, 5.1% once a month, 3.3% every two weeks and 2.9% once a week.

BOY SCHOOLS ACCOUNT FOR THE HIGHEST UNDERAGE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION WHILE THE HABIT TENDS TO BE ALMOST EVENLY SKEWED BETWEEN THOSE THAT RECEIVE >3000 & <500 PER TERM AS POCKET MONEY. MINORS FROM SINGLE PARENT AND GRANDPARENT-LED FAMILIES ARE MORE LIKELY TO ENGAGE IN UNDERAGE CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL
Courtesy NACADA/ Ipsos

-Mpasho


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Business

KQ resumes direct flights to New York

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The national carrier Kenya Airways (KQ) resumed its direct flights between Nairobi and New York on Sunday.

In a tweet, KQ announced the move and topped it up with an offer to passengers who book their flights before December 10 that they will enjoy discounted prices.

Welcome back to the Big Apple! Today we resume our service between Nairobi and New York, and we can’t wait to welcome you on board. Book your ticket via https://t.co/hitS3Whxtp before December 10th to enjoy discounted rates ✈️🌎 *Disclaimer – video from our pre-COVID archives pic.twitter.com/1kET4h0kRK

— Kenya Airways (@KenyaAirways) November 29, 2020

“Welcome back to the Big Apple! Today we resume our service between Nairobi and New York, and we can’t wait to welcome you on board,” the airline said.

The national carrier last operated the passenger flights using the Nairobi-New York route in April after disruptions caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

KQ resumed international flights in August after suspending all its operations in March following the government’s directives after the firsts case of Covid-19 was confirmed in Kenya.

On Saturday, October 31, KQ announced that it had postponed New York flights’ resumption.

Through a notice, the airline said the decision to postpone the flights was informed by the increased cancellation of flight bookings to New York.

“We regret to announce that due to increased cancellations of flight bookings to New York City, we have pushed back the resumption of our service to this destination to November 29. We sincerely apologise for the inconvenience caused,” read the statement then.

Kenya Airways inaugurated direct flights to the US in October 2018, cutting the journey to the US by 15 hours and by October 2019 KQ had flown at least 105,084 passengers after completing 594 flights to and from New York.

by NN


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