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Myra Anubi, a Kenyan journalist who lives in London is recovering from coronavirus

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Ms Myra Anubi, a Kenyan journalist who lives in London, is Sunday on her 9th day of self-isolation at home after being diagnosed with coronavirus.

With a sick mother-in law in the same building, who contracted the virus around the same time as her after a relative suspected to be infected paid them a visit, Ms Anubi, 30, said the worry of infecting her two children — aged two-and-a-half and five — drains her more than the disease itself.

STAY AT HOME
She said that once she exhibited the symptoms, she filled in a questionnaire provided by the government online and was given instructions on how to take care of herself.

The British government is encouraging those affected to stay home once they present the symptoms as opposed to going to hospital. They call the helpline in case of any difficulties and leave hospitals to only attend to those in critical condition. She spoke to our writer Justus Wanga on Saturday on her experience and lessons, a phone interview interrupted at least four times by the children.

How are you coping with the condition?

It has confined us home. But there is hope. We initially thought it would be too harsh on us but we are happy its pang have died down, a bit. Regular honey, ginger, a lot of hot fluids and fruits have helped in managing it.

What symptoms did you experience before confirmation that indeed it was Covid-19?
It started with a deep cough and loss of appetite. A sore throat and excessive sweating that comes with a fever. I also experienced a headache and pain in tonsils. I thought my throat was swollen.

The temperature was very high, I had weak joints and general body weakness almost similar to those experienced by malaria patients.

What drugs are you using?

We are largely surviving on painkillers. Paracetamol to be precise, as advised by the health authorities and treat specifics symptoms when they show. Oh, and cough syrups here and there.

How has the quarantine affected your life?

We are indoors, some working from home.

What are some of the measures you took when you heard of the disease outbreak?

We never imagined that it would catch up with us. When news of the virus hit the headlines, like every family, we rushed and stocked up on essential food and commodities. We never thought we would fall victim.

Are there occasions you’ve been worried that your condition may worsen?

Not really, we have emergency lines to call in cases of distress. We have not gotten there yet and hope not to since the condition is more severe in the first few days. The response here is very swift.

Other than your mother-in- law, who else is affected in your family?

My husband and children are fine although we had interacted before my symptoms presented. They are all not allowed to go out until the lapse of 14 days, it is the government policy when a family member falls sick.

I was initially worried about the children because they are always with me but assurance from the paediatrician that they’ll be fine has kept us going.

How do you rate the British government’s handling of the pandemic?

They have done a good job. The constant updates have helped root out the panic associated with the initial days of the outbreak. They are on top of things. Emergency numbers are working.

I have been following the Kenyan government’s handling of the situation and I must admit, they are doing a good job too. I would urge the public not to panic, like many others across the globe we can defeat this virus. Let everyone follow hygiene and other measures given out by Health authorities.

What do you see as a major threat to tackling the virus?

Misinformation. This is bound to create more panic among the masses. I ask parents not to panic, get in touch with their doctors especially for cases where one has other health conditions that may make them more vulnerable to the virus.

I have also read reports that many are fleeing major towns like Nairobi to seek refuge in the villages, they must be careful not to expose the elderly at home to danger.

By Nation.co.ke


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Courts

Four children fight claims they were disowned by late MP

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Four children of former Keiyo North MP William Murgor yesterday fought allegations that they had been disowned by their father before his death.

While testifying before the High Court in Eldoret, Ambrose Kiplagat Murgor, one of the four children said to have been born out of wedlock, told the court their father never disowned him or any of his three siblings.

While being cross-examined before Justice Hellen Omondi, Mr Kiplagat said he was a biological child of the late MP, adding that the contrary claims were only made to lock him and his siblings out of the MP’s vast estate.

“My late father never disowned me or my siblings,” Kiplagat told the court.

He said he was born in 1970 at Murgor’s Kaptagat farm before they moved in 1976 to Chesigot farm in Elgeyo Marakwet County.

The four – Kiplagat, Oscar Murgor, Sharon Murgor and Faith Murgor – who are children of the former MP’s fourth wife Anna Kimoi, have told the court they were brought up with the other children.

“We were raised together with the other siblings from the different houses. I was in school with my two brothers, Collins and Kenneth, in the same primary school, all along living as brothers,” he added.

He told the court that he did not know the reasons as to why he and his brother Oscar did not get a share of their father’s farms like rest of his siblings.

Kiplagat added that his elder sister Enid Cheptanui filed the case against her step-brother Francis Murgor, Chemutai Murgor and Keiyo North MP Dr James Murgor for excluding them in the distribution of the Sh1.4 billion family estate.

While testifying in the succession dispute, James denied knowing Kiplagat and his three siblings Oscar, Sheila and Faith Murgor.

While James claimed to have only been familiar with them for a few years, Kiplagat on the other hand told the court the MP was well known to him and that he had even campaigned for him.

“I campaigned for him in three elections, and he always introduced me as his brother. When my mother was sick, I was in contact with the MP, who even helped in paying the hospital bill,”

by Stanardmedia.co.ke


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Lifestyle

Mukhisa Kituyi: Why I think I can be a good President

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He is considered one of Kenya’s finest brains and has held several high positions both locally and internationally.

Currently serving as the Secretary-General of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Dr Mukhisa Kituyi’s decorated CV is impeccable.

In an interview with a local TV station on Wednesday, Kituyi spoke of his desire to occupy Kenya’s top seat, saying rising from adversity during his childhood days is a huge motivation.

“As I have gone to 119 countries around the world, I am constantly asking myself what they are doing better than us that makes them shine.

“I feel my body still has the energy…my head still has the intellectual capacity to make that contribution in a practical way…” he said.

Adding: “I have a sense of shared empathy with the vulnerable, not only a desire to give hope to the hopeless but a burning ambition that through enterprise Kenya, I can be part of the solutions to build Kenya for the next generation.”

Kituyi said once he leaves his position at the UN he will share his ideas with Kenyans and he strongly believes he will be the right person for the job.

“In the increasingly likely case that I will be offering candidature for President of this country after I leave my position with the UN, I think I will give the Kenyan population reason why I think I will be the right person for that job.

“I cannot do it while I am still winding down my international obligations but I think I am the face of a set of Kenyans who believe in purposeful Kenya,” he said.

Responding to those who claim he is not in touch with the realities on the ground due to extensive travel, Kituyi said he believes in constant learning and does not have all the answers but wants to be part of a team that will engage in structured positive conversations.

Mukhisa has also had stints in the political arena having been elected to the Kenyan Parliament for the first time in 1992 on a Ford-Kenya ticket and was re-elected in 1997 and 2002 as Kimilili MP.

He was also Kenya’s Minister of Trade and Industry from 2002 to 2007. During this period, Kituyi chaired the Council of Ministers of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) and the African Trade Ministers’ Council for two years.

He also served as chairman of the Council of Ministers of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, and was the lead negotiator for Eastern and Southern African ministers during the European Union-ACP Economic Partnership Agreement negotiations.

He was convenor of the agriculture negotiations carried out at the World Trade Organization’s Sixth Ministerial Conference held in Hong Kong, China in 2005.

From 2008 to 2012, Kituyi was a member of a team of experts advising the presidents of the nations of the East African Community on how to establish more effective regional economic links.

From 2011 to 2012, he was a consultant for the African Union Commission, where he helped to develop the structure for a pan-African free trade area.

Immediately before becoming UNCTAD Secretary-General, Kituyi was Chief Executive of the Kenya Institute of Governance based in Nairobi.

by Standardmedia.co.ke


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Lifestyle

Man’s burial inside his house baffles Kirinyaga residents

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Residents of Mucagara Village in Kirinyaga County were on Wednesday evening treated to a rare funeral after a man was buried inside his house.

They watched in astonishment as the coffin containing the remains of the 65-year-old retired coffee factory manager, Simon Muriithi Mwaniki, was lowered into the grave that had been dug in the living room.

Some whispered to each other during the dramatic send-off which left many in awe.

According to the man’s relative, prior to his death, he had expressed his wish to be buried in the house.

Emotions ran high as the funeral ceremony went on in the village in Gichugu Constituency.

“We had to act according to his wishes to avoid a curse and being haunted by his spirits,” said Mr James Njuki, the man’s eldest son.

Mwaniki was hurriedly buried in a brief ceremony conducted by an African Independent Pentecostal Church of Africa priest, Jackson Muchiri.

Committed suicide

When Mwaniki committed suicide, no one mourned his death as he had asked family members not to do so when he was alive.

“Before he took his life he had told us that there should be no mourning when he dies. Therefore, we ensured that we never gathered at any time within the homestead to mourn him,” added Mr Njuki.

Mr Njuki recalled how on November 18 they found their father dangling from the roof of his house with a rope around his neck.

It was then that the matter was reported to the local police officers who drove to the scene and took the body to Kibugi Funeral Home.

His children suspected that their father took his life due to the depression he suffered after his wife, Juliana Muthoni, died.

“My father started drinking heavily after his wife died. He loved my mother so much and we think he was so much affected by her death and became depressed,” said Mr Njuki.

Rev Muchiri described the funeral as unique.

“For the 38 years that I have been conducting funerals, this is the first time to bury someone inside a house,” he said.

The residents said they were taken aback when they arrived at the homestead and saw the grave inside Mwaniki’s house.

“We were baffled. We have never witnessed such a funeral in this village. This is a funeral of its own kind which shocked all of us,” Mr Eliud Muriithi said.

by nation.africa


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