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Bishop Wanjiru denies hosting prayer meet that led to Covid-19

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When former Starehe legislator Bishop Margaret Wanjiru went to Aga Khan hospital a week ago, on Saturday she told journalists that she initially thought she was suffering from food poisoning, only for her to turn positive of COVID-19.

She was also suffering from diarrhea- which is the latest symptom of coronavirus, according to public health officials.

The Jesus is Alive Ministries bishop tested positive alongside her two grandchildren, who have also recovered. Her six members of staff are still in hospital.

“COVID-19 is real and should be taken seriously, and not only when you are at work. I did not leave home, the disease found me home,” she told a news conference at the Aga Khan Hospital, shortly after discharge.

She urged Kenyans to heed to the Ministry of Health precautionary measures and not to fear seeking medical help in hospital due to coronavirus.

“We take some things for granted when we are at home. We do not put on masks while at home. Even at home, use the mask, as much as you can. Learn from me,” the former legislator who started the briefing with a word of a prayer said.

Bishop Margaret Wanjiru was among patients discharged Saturday after recovering from COVID-19. /MOSES MUOKI.

The Bishop and her two grandchildren walked out of the hospital free of the virus, a week after being admitted. She attributes her healing to God.

READ ALSO:   ‘I did private testing,’ Bishop Margaret Wanjiru’s son speaks out

“All along, I knew I had eaten bad food,” she said, “I did not have flu or cough. Anytime you feel disorder in your body, do not shy away from going to hospital.”

Wanjiru and her two grandchildren are among 26 Kenyans who have recovered from the disease, raising the tally to 464.

Health Chief Administrative Secretary Dr Rashid Aman said the patients were discharged from various hospitals across the country.

The death toll rose to 63, after a 50-year-old man succumbed to the virus.

The Ministry of Health said most of the people who have died were suffering from other underlying conditions, including Diabetes.

The Ministry said on Saturday that public health officials had discovered a new symptom exhibited by most COVID-19 patients–Diarrhoea. This is coupled up by high fever, dry cough and tiredness.

Dr Aman said the symptom has been recorded in many other parts of the world.

On Saturday, Bishop Wanjiru said she initially did not have coronavirus symptoms but had diarrhea and food poisoning, only to be confirmed with COVID-19 on testing.

The former Assistant Minister has been at Aga Khan Hospital since last week, and is among the 26 patients declared COVID-19 free on Saturday and now stand discharged from hospital.

READ ALSO:   Bishop in ICU

The COVID-19 curve remained on a sharp increase in Kenya since last week, even as President Uhuru Kenyatta prepares to make a key announcement on the status of a national curfew and other restrictions.

A national curfew has been in place for the past two months until June 6, along with restrictions on cessation of movement into and out of Nairobi, Mombasa, Kwale, Kilifi and Mandera Counties.

On Saturday, there were 143 new cases reported, just a day after posting 127 cases on Friday.

On Thursday, 147 new cases were recorded from various counties, with particular focus to Nairobi and Mombasa counties which have been recording high figures.

Cummulatively, Kenya had recorded 1,888 positive cases by May 30, with a warning from the Ministry of Health on more cases as the country draws closer to its peak which was projected to start in June to around September.

Health CAS Aman said Kenya is it a critical period on the pandemic, and urged Kenyans to cooperate in observing social distancing and all other measures imposed to help prevent the spread.

The government has warned Kenyans against dropping the guard, after increased cases of people not using masks in public places were reported.

Dr Aman said the government was concerned at a new habit by leaders who have been holding large meetings, and urged them to respect the measures put in place.

READ ALSO:   CAS Aman touched by man who reported Ruaka residents’ carefree lifestyle

“We must respect these guidelines because that is the only way we will be able to beat the virus,” he said.

Concerns were raised after COTU Secretary General Francis Atwoli convened a meeting at his Kajiado residence on Friday, attended by more that 50 leaders, among them four Governors and Devolution Cabinet Secretary Eugene Wamalwa, in what was billed as a Luhya-unity bid.

By Capital.co.ke

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Health

Appeal for support to establish a free cancer screening center in Kenya

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BY JACKLINE N. MWATI

Kenya Cancer Care Foundation is a community-based organisation focusing on offering free cervical and breast cancer screening to all women in Kenya, starting with a pilot program in Gatundu North Sub-County in Kiambu County.

We also offer free prostate cancer screening to all men from 45 years and above as well as provision of  free HPV vaccine to all the Girls from the age of 10-12 years.

We strive to have a cancer free nation.

To support this project, kindly send you donation to the phone number provided in in the flyer. You can also call us and we will be happy to answer any questions.

The KENYA CANCER CARE FOUNDATION® is a subsidiary project of the Maryhelp Mission Rehabilitation and Counselling center. The project was founded in the year 2016 to cater for free cancer screening and ensuring there is proper referrals.

Its main goal is to ensure there is an equitable distribution of FREE cervical, breast and prostate cancer services to all the Men/women of reproductive age insured or un-insured. It also ensures all the girls 10-12 years are vaccinated against HPV [Human papilloma virus] .

We believe in the modality and the methodology that no man/woman should die of prostate, breast and cervical cancer since it’s a disease that is treatable and manageable if early screening, vaccination and correct diagnosis techniques are instituted.

READ ALSO:   ‘I did private testing,’ Bishop Margaret Wanjiru’s son speaks out

Practically if all the men/women are screened regularly for prostate, cervical and breast cancer then it’s evident that any form of cancer will be detected early and proper therapy instituted. Meanwhile we are currently working with several cancer institutes for the treatment and diagnostic procedures as part of our referrals. We are advocating for these tests to be FREE to all and mandatory to our population. This will ensure we achieve our mission by giving these expensive tests to those who cannot afford them. On achieving this,

We are in our initial phase towards the construction of our cancer diagnostic and treatment hospital along Thika-Mang’u road.

  It’s quite important to note that Kiambu County is only served by one cancer referral Centre that is Kenyatta University Hospital. There should be a MODEL structure put in place to have at least one cancer screening and diagnostic Centre in every Sub County.

The Centre will cater for early screening and early treatment according to the WHO protocol. One of this model pilot project is the one that we are proposing to have in Gatundu North then the same will be duplicated in Githunguri then we shall roll out this project to other counties in Kenya. It’s important to emphasize on the role of cancer screening as a pilot project.

READ ALSO:   Bishop in ICU

 More details to follow…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.4STATED MISSION:

Advocates and supports Cancer prevention through vaccination and early screening.

To make a positive difference in the lives of those affected by prostate, cervical and breast cancer.

Aids in providing screening, vaccination, treatment, after-care, educational materials, and patient/family assistance and information.

                                                                                                                     

 

1.5VISION:

“To stop cancer before it starts”. Early, regular screening, early treatment with good prognosis.

Embarking on the best oncological care on our proposed state-of-the-art-cancer hospital and use the Centre as a facility for cancer training and research.

 

 

1.6MODUS OPERANDI:

The project initial phase will start at Gatundu-North Sub County. The project will be conducted through the use of the EVA System. This is a digital colposcope for enhanced visualization of the cervix. The EVA software provides secure online data management, image filters and annotations, and a telegynecology platform. All the cervical images captured will be evaluated and decisions made if they are positive or negative for cancer. The data obtained will be stored in a smart card and all patient information/data will be stored there in a PIN code secured smart card.Also in case the Smart card is misplaced, then the finger prints will be used in case of otherwise. The patient will be followed using this smart card and an automatic tele-reminder of her next schedule will be automated. There shall be no treatment of any medical condition NOT unless the smart card is revealed and showed as a prove of cervical /breast cancer screening [or finger print method to access the patients data].Then all the female children in that family will be followed for HPV vaccination for the scheduled vaccination doses and the smart card indicating that shall be issued.

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Health

Why I chose to have my breast cut off

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Lucy Njeri vividly recalls the horrors she underwent on the day she received the test results showing she had breast cancer.

“It took me by surprise,” Lucy says. “Emotionally, I went down. I tried to clear my tears, since I was still in the office, but immediately I left the gate, I broke down and cried. I was all by myself. I was not ready for it.”

The result indicated she had ductal carcinoma [cancer that starts in cells that line the milk ducts), grade 1. The news hit her like a ton of bricks. And so she sat at the gate to her workplace, wrapped in colossal agony, struggling to come to terms with her new, sorry predicament. She was still nursing emotional bruises sustained by her mothers lengthy battle with throat cancer. Now here she was, physically sick from a similarly debilitating malady.

Just then, a complete stranger, touched by the sight of a lonesome lady crying her heart out, approached to help.

“This passer-by tapped my back and asked me, ‘is it okay’? I shook my head, and gave her my results. She read and told me it was go ing to be okay. She asked if she could call my mum. I told her no, she cannot call anyone in my family, since everyone was sick emotionally,” she explains.

Thus had begun Lucy’s long battle with breast cancer, a journey which, for many people, is beset with uncertainties and excruciating consequences on a person’s material and emotional well being. For Lucy at least, she had a shoulder to lean on right from the onset, and this assuaged pangs of grief that had belligerently gripped the mother of three on that fateful day.

READ ALSO:   72 medics have contracted coronavirus in line of duty – MoH

Lucy’s newly found comforter cut short her journey, offered to buy her a meal and they walked to a nearby restaurant. But Lucy couldn’t eat. She cried her heart out the whole afternoon. She later gave the Samaritan the phone contact of one of her relatives, who came to pick her up.

“At night, I could not digest what I had read”, Lucy narrates, fighting back tears. “The next thing in my mind was committing suicide. I had seen anguish and pain my mum was going through. I was not ready for it.”

As luck would have it, Lucy wouldn’t hang herself that night. She didn’t find a place to hang herself in the house. But she cried the whole night.

On waking up the next morning, her uncle candidly advised her to brace for the new reality. It was time to summon her inner strength, and face her condition head-on.

“My uncle told me to face the lion, and fight it,” she adds. The words served to buoy her through the turmoil. But another calamity lay ahead – nurses were on strike, and her hospital couldn’t take her in. Her doctor advised her to seek surgery elsewhere. After weighing her options, Lucy settled on Kenyatta National Hospital, where she was booked for surgery.

READ ALSO:   Kiambu now overtakes Mombasa in infection rate

“I had my breast removed,” she says.

Just before the mastectomy, a medic had counselled Lucy to be positive about the consequences. There are people without breasts out there, the medic told her. They are surviving, and they’re okay. So, there is nothing to worry about. Life has to go on.

With these words, Lucy mustered the courage to go through it. And she bubbles with joy, noting hers was a choice between living with one breast or dying to maintain the image. She chose life.

“I have seen people who resist treatment,
who say their breast(s) cannot be removed, and we lose them. I’d rather not have the breast, and be alive. I am lucky to have one. I have seen people who don’t have both, and they’re still there. Since then, I look at life from a different perspective”.

Thankfully, Lucy’s NHIF covered her treatment. This included six chemotherapies, radiotherapy, follow-up treatment and hormonal therapy.

Constant support This was a tough time for Lucy’s three children, who underwent manifold emotional excursions in these trying moments. They wondered at spike in visitors to their home. They’d been told their mother was sick, but couldn’t quite relate with the sickness. Lucy requested help from a friend who broke down the news to her children, while assuring them that mum would be okay. She recalls the news was particularly devastating to her daughter.

READ ALSO:   151 cases, but Kibra isn’t on lockdown

Now a fully recovered and ebullient cancer survivor, Lucy recounts her journey through the malaise with appreciation for galaxy of magnanimous supporters who held her hand through the predicament.

Right from the benevolent stranger who took her time to comfort Lucy in her low moments at the gate, to her circle of friends that helped her raise money for biopsy, her relatives, her husband and children, and neighbours, some of who would do her laundry, look after her children and even provided foodstuff and paid house rent in the bleak moments. There was even a matatu crew that would wait for her early in the morning on the days she went for treatment. And of tremendous importance to her journey, have been the healthcare providers who handled her condition.

“There are people you can’t even pay,” Lucy says. “I got a lot of help from neighbours and friends and even strangers.”

Her journey encapsulates the importance of a support network in the healing process of a breast cancer patient. As the world celebrates the Breast Cancer Awareness month, a call is made upon everyone to lend a helping hand and a supportive shoulder for those caught up in the throes of this exacting malady, a malady that deals long-lasting blows on the purses and hearts of hundreds of households it afflicts.

by PD.co.ke

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Health

Youths are dying of depression as their helpless parents sit by

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It used to be that, whenever I read articles in the newspaper or watched news about children as young as 13 taking their lives, I often wondered why anyone would do that. Now I understand.

I once approached my parents about my deteriorating mental health and all they said was “you, youngsters are too sensitive”.

This was confusing. What did it mean? I wondered whether there was something wrong with reaching out for help. That statement discouraged me from ever talking about my struggle. I also accepted that our parents simply do not know what to do and how to help. I also know that I am not the only one who has experienced this. For most of my age mates, the issue seems to be the same — they do not have anyone to talk to.

When they try to talk, the situation gets worse. I just wish that they would take us for therapy or the hospital where we can find the counsellors who are trained to handle the issues that affect us.

Generational curse

I wish our parents paid attention to us, so that we are not only better people now but are also better parents to the children we will have in the future. The way they are relating to us reveals something akin to a generational curse.

READ ALSO:   Bishop in ICU

I have not put my finger on it but it could be internalised self-hate or the fear of disappointment. I see that the way our parents treat us is the same way they handle their own issues. They do not want to seek medical help even when they know they are unwell.

They do not have healthy relationships and friendships, and do not want us to either.  I hope that our parents will be able to approach mental health with the seriousness it deserves.

Suicide

They wait until someone around them dies by suicide, then join the world in posting “rest in peace” or “you are missed” on social media. The parents of those who have been affected will be mobilised to help the bereaved.

Everyone will then move on with their life, until someone else takes their life and the cycle continues.

by nation.co.ke

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