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SAD: Young Kenyan lady passes away in US

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It’s with heavy hearts that we accept the promotion to Glory of Alice Nduta (daughter to Grace Macharia and Bernard Wanyika) who went to be with the Lord on 05/13/2020 after being found unresponsive in their home in Buckeye and she was to graduate from high school this week.

Family Address 31081 W Amelia Ave Buckeye AZ 85396.

Your prayers, presence and contributions are greatly appreciated!

Bernard- 480-469-7686

Grace – 480-465-6586

Please send your contributions and support via cashup /zelle to:

Paul Kiarie – 9728557521
Zelle to paulkiarie2310@gmail.com
Carol Mwihia – 6232370770

Thank you for standing with the Wanyika’s. 🙏🙏🙏

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Here dad: Secret to being a good father

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Past child development research often ignored fathers. But new studies are finding that non-maternal caregivers play a crucial role in children’s behaviour, happiness, even cognitive skills.

Today, many dads are celebrated for being sensitive, caring and hands-on. A growing body of research is transforming our understanding of how they can shape their children’s lives from the start, challenging conventional ideas of parenthood and gender.

This is striking given that until the 1970s, the role of fathers in their children’s development was not much studied. Their most important job was seen as economically supporting the mother, who would in turn be the emotional anchor for the child.

“There was a lot of focus on how relationships with mothers were very important, and there was very little thought about other social relationships,” says Michael Lamb, a psychologist at the University of Cambridge who has been studying fathers since the 1970s. “The most obvious of those was the father-child relationship — a relationship that was viewed as more important as children grow older, but was always viewed as secondary to the mother-child relationship.”

Now, new research is showing that the social world of children is much richer, and more complex, than previously thought.

It is not just dads who have moved into the spotlight. Grandparents, same-sex parents, step-parents and single parents have also helped researchers understand what really makes a child thrive — and that it’s not just about one caregiver.

Benefits

A range of recent studies show how flexible parenting roles can be. Psychologist Ruth Feldman of Israel’s Bar-Ilan University has found that, just like mothers, fathers experience a hormonal boost when caring for their babies, which helps the bonding process. When dads are the main caregivers, their brains adapt to the task.

And emotional involvement matters. Babies with emotionally engaged dads show better mental development as toddlers and are less likely to have behavioural problems later on, compared to babies whose dads behave in a more detached way. Older children benefit, too. Those whose fathers, or father figures, are more emotionally supportive, tend to be more satisfied with life and have better relationships with teachers and other children.

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“The factors that lead to the formation of relationships are exactly the same for mother and father,” Lamb says.

Past research has found that mothers and fathers do tend to interact differently with small children: mothers bond more through gentle caretaking, while fathers typically bond through play. But that, Lamb says, has less to do with gender and more with the division of childcare.

Studies of same-sex couples and stay-at-home dads have shown that regardless of gender, it is the parent who works during the day, and comes home in the evening, who tends to play wilder games, like picking up their baby and swinging them around. The parent who looks after the baby all day is likely to interact with them more calmly.

In heterosexual couples, the parent who takes on most of the care during the day is often still the mother for a range of social and economic reasons. But involving dads more from the start can have many benefits, research has shown. And play, regardless of whether it’s calm or boisterous, is particularly beneficial.

“Play is the language of childhood: it’s the way children explore the world, it’s how they build relationships with other children,” says Paul Ramchandani, who studies play in education, development and learning at the University of Cambridge. He and his team observed fathers playing with their babies in the first months of life, then tracked the children’s development. They found that early father-baby interactions are much more important than previously assumed.

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Babies whose dads were more active and engaged during play had fewer behavioural difficulties at age one compared to those with more distant or detached dads. They also did better in cognitive tests at two, for example in their ability to recognise shapes. These outcomes were independent of the mother’s relationship with the child.

Ramchandani cautions that the results should not be interpreted as a clear causal link. Instead of directly affecting their children’s development, the distant dads’ behaviour could, for example, be a sign of other problems in the family. Still, he sees the study as an encouragement to play with your child long before they can crawl and talk: “Some dads don’t do that when the babies are young because they’re unsure about what they should do, or unsure if they’re doing the right things.” Of course, new mothers may feel similarly hesitant.

But Ramchandani says it can be as simple as sitting the baby on your lap, making eye contact, and observing what they enjoy.

“It’s the getting involved that’s the most important thing, because you’ll get better at it if you practice it. It’s not something that comes naturally to everybody. Some people are really good at it, but for most people it takes practice,” he says.

In many ways, fathers are more involved than ever. But the bulk of parenting still seems to fall to women. Around the world, women spend up to 10 times more time on unpaid care work – including childcare – than men.

“I think we’re at a crossroads in terms of how we view fathers,” says Anna Machin, an anthropologist and author of The Life of Dad, a book on modern fathering.

Machin argues that while most dads want to be more active at home, the workplace has not really adapted to this. “That’s where the tension is for men at the moment: between needing and wanting to care, and also needing to still provide,” she says.

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Reversal of roles

Given the financial pressures many families face, Machin fears there could actually be a reversal to more traditional roles: “If you’re a dad now, if you want to be involved, you have to be a bit of a pioneer in the workplace. You have to go against all that culture of, ‘men go back to work’. You have to be the one to go, ‘Actually, I want to assert my rights’.

“And that’s quite a hard thing to do.”

A more equal division can have many long-term benefits. Researchers led by sociologists Helen Norman and Colette Fagan at the University of Manchester found that fathers were more likely to be involved when the child was aged three if they shared childcare equally when the child was nine months old.

In Scotland, a study of more than 2,500 families showed that supportive father-child relationships matter as much as mother-child relationships for children’s wellbeing.

“One of the points we’ve learned is that there isn’t a model of the ideal father. There isn’t a recipe for what the father needs to do or what sorts of behaviour he needs to emulate,” says Lamb. Ultimately, he says, it’s about being emotionally available, and meeting the child’s needs. “Different people do that in different ways. There’s been a lot of talk about, ‘do dads need to do that in a masculine way?’ And the answer is no, they don’t need to.

“They need to do it in a way that makes sense for them, that feels authentic, that allows them to be fully and coherently engaged in the relationship with their child.”

by Standardmedia.co.ke

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Rapper Khaligraph Jones, wife welcome second born baby

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BY KEVIN KOECH

Kenyan rapper Brian Omollo aka Khaligraph Jones and his wife Georgina Muteti have welcomed a new born baby into their family.

Reports indicate that the couple welcomed their second born baby two weeks ago, but kept the news a secret.

Taking to Instagram, Muteti mentioned that she gave birth to her second born through normal delivery, despite having an emergency Cesarean Section (CS) for her first born, baby Amali.

“I did it! I got my VBAC! 11/10/20 12:58AM, After having a caesarean birth *emergency* with my first child(Amali),I had a safe vaginal delivery with my second. Baby Lu

“That was only after changing hospitals twice,switching doctors last minute and believing in myself! Through prayer and screaming during labour I delivered my son. I’m a happy and tired mum of two now!” Read Muteti’s post.

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DP Ruto calls out NSAC over public gathering rules

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BY KEVIN KOECH

Deputy President William Ruto lashed out at the government for restricting public gatherings in the country.

Ruto was speaking on Sunday the 25th of October 2020 while at a church service in Our Lady of Assumption, Indangalasia Catholic Church, Kakamega.

The second in command blasted the National Security Advisory Committee (NSAC) further condemning the restriction on visiting churches.

“We will not accept the restriction of church services in the country; worship should not be restricted in any way. You cannot be restricted to worship, hold prayer meetings until someone issues a go-ahead,” Ruto said.

Further adding,

“That is not possible. I want to tell those who think our constitutional right to worship God in the manner that we please is going to be conditioned in permission from whoever.”

Not one to sway from what he believes, Ruto defiantly announced he would continue visiting churches.

According to him, he does not need to seek permission to attend church services.

Ruto further added that he attends church services because he believes in God.

He then condemned the government for limiting citizens’ right to worship.

The second in command went on to note that it is impossible to negotiate on religion matters.

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“I want to remind government officials, the jubilee government was formed after prayers for I and Uhuru, we cannot be the same government announcing restrictions on worship

“I want to ask public officers, to keep off matters of worship because they are not negotiable, we cannot negotiate on matters to do with worship with anybody or any law,” Ruto said.

Ruto’s visit to the Our Lady of Assumption, Indangalasia Catholic Church was supposed to be on March.

However, he had to postpone it after the coronavirus pandemic hit the nation.

The police also recently refused to approve Ruto’s visit to the church.

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