Connect with us

Africa

Suspect in police officer kidnap case escapes

Published

on

A Ugandan accused of kidnapping and possibly killing a Kenyan police officer in January escaped from custody in mysterious circumstances.

Martin Wasike, 27, was discovered missing from Kamukunji police cells in Nairobi on Thursday morning, two days after a Nairobi court directed that he be detained at the station alongside his co-accused for three weeks.

Kamukunji OCS said the suspect disappeared between Wednesday 3.30pm and Thursday 3.30am.

“No grilles were cut and no one was injured. He may have tricked someone and left,” an officer told the Saturday Nation.

Central police commander Mark Wanjala said a search for the suspect in Mathare slums, where a female friend used to host him, was conducted but did not yielded fruit.

“The search is ongoing. We are also investigating the circumstances under which he escaped custody. His co-accused did not escape; they are in custody,” he said.

Mr Wasike, another Ugandan by the name Shariff Wanabwa and Phoebe Anido Andayi, from Busia County, are accused of kidnapping police constable Abel Misati on January 19 and being in possession of some of his stolen items, among them his mobile phone.

The phone was found on one of the trio in Eastleigh on April 17 by DCI detectives.

The investigating officer told the court on Wednesday there is a likelihood they will prefer more charges against the suspects.

The trio’s plea for bail was opposed by State prosecutor Winnie Moraa and the lawyer representing the officer’s family, Mr Alfred Nyandieka.

Ms Moraa argued they might jump bail since they have no permanent residence and identification documents.

“The severe sentences pronounced in the charges they face are an incentive for the three to escape the wrath of the law,” Ms Moraa told the court.

Mr Nyandieka said the disappearance of the officer had caused his family a lot of stress and trauma, and urged the court not to release the three so that they can assist police in locating the officer.

“The three are a threat to the security of the public if they can kidnap a well-trained police officer whose whereabouts are yet to be established,” Mr Alfred Nyandieka, the officer’s family lawyer, told the court.

Another Ugandan believed to have been the mastermind of the abduction is being tracked down by police with the help of Interpol. The suspect is believed to have fled to Uganda.

In his ruling, Senior Principal Magistrate Bernard Ochoi ordered that the three be detained until June 2, when the investigating officer will inform the court whether there will be changes to the circumstances of the case.

by Saturday Nation

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Africa

Kabuga will pay for my son’s death, woman says

Published

on

“Kabuga will pay for the death of my son. He must pay.”

These are the words of a mother who has been grieving for 17 years.

For Ms Lydia Wangui and the family of William Mwaura Munuhe, there is now a ray of hope following the arrest of Rwandan fugitive Felicien Kabuga.

Mr Munuhe, a freelance journalist and close associate of Kabuga, was one of the closest links the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) had in its quest to capture one of the world’s most wanted fugitives back in 2003.

COLD BLOODED MURDER

But days before he could help FBI agents lure Kabuga into a trap, Mr Munuhe was murdered in cold blood in his house in Nairobi.

That would mark the beginning of a 17-year pursuit for truth and justice.

With the arrest of the man believed to be behind their kin’s death, the family now can afford a sigh of relief. But justice is far from being found.

The Nation tracked down the family at their home in Muruguru, Nyeri County.

Ms Wangui is just coming to terms with news of Kabuga’s arrest in France two days ago. For her, it is a mixture of both joy and a painful reminder of her son’s death.

PAIN STILL FRESH

“I could not believe it when I heard that he has been arrested. But the pain is still fresh in my heart. I suffered for a very long time and I continue to feel the pain of having to bury my child. Now it is his turn to suffer,” she said.

For 17 years, this family has pursued justice over their son’s brutal murder, knocking on every door that had power to help and when all offices locally became unresponsive, they sought help overseas.

The family has already sought help from the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague but even that has not helped serve them justice.

It has been a long journey filled with anguish, lies and betrayal.

DANGEROUS

So dangerous was the pursuit for the truth and justice that even Mr Munuhe’s father, a former police officer who died in 2013, could not dare ask questions to his colleagues and superiors regarding his son’s death.

On February 16, 2003, detectives from the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) visited their home in Nyeri with the news of their son’s death. They said that the journalist had died of carbon monoxide poisoning. This was the first lie that was given to the family.

“When we went to his house in Karen, they did not even want us to get in. But I demanded to see for myself where he had died. They had already taken the body away,” Ms Wangui said.

She recounted seeing bloody footprints across the living room of the house and her son’s belongings scattered on the floor. Initially, police told her that his body was found on a mattress soaked with sweat.

BLOODY SCENE

Scenes from Mr Munuhe’s guest room told a different story and it turned out that the said sweat was actually blood.

“There was a lot of blood on the floor and the bed was broken. All I could think of is how my son suffered a painful death,” she said.

Mr Munuhe’s brother, Josephat Mureithi, was among those who positively identified the body at the City Mortuary. He said that his face had been badly disfigured, possibly from acid burns.

Mr Mureithi has been at the forefront in the fight for justice for his slain brother and feels that Kabuga’s arrest, though significant, is still far from giving the family complete closure.

He still lives in fear of Kabuga’s accomplices. Even with the outlaw in custody, he feels someone is still watching.

“Even journalists who tried asking us about our brother’s death received threats. There is a letter that we found while moving his belongings threatening that we would be killed one after the other. We have always lived in fear and still live in fear because his (Kabuga’a) accomplices are still at large,” Mr Mureithi said.

WRITTEN TO ICC

Mr Mureithi has written to the ICC and now wants his brother’s murder investigated by The Hague-based court and for Kabuga to stand trial.

“I wrote to the ICC and they said that his case would be placed in the archives until new evidence is found. Now is the time to look into the matter,” he said.

While Kabuga might not stand trial for the murder of Munuhe, his family believes the ICC will help deliver justice that has long evaded them.

Given the opportunity, Ms Wangui says she would want to point Kabuga to her son’s grave and remind him of the pain he caused her.

“He has caused so much pain to me and I want him to know that he will pay for it. And I know the many other people he caused pain have their own story to tell,” she said.

By Daily Nation

Continue Reading

Africa

Woman dies at Catholic priest’s house after lying to hubby she had gone for funeral

Published

on

A married woman in Zambia is said to have died inside a Catholic priest’s house after she lied to her husband she was attending a funeral elsewhere.

TUKO.co.ke reports has learnt the woman is a member of the Catholic Women’s league from St Maurice Catholic Church in Lusaka.

The two are said to be lovers. Photo: Lusaka TimesA collage of the priest and the married woman. Photo source: Lusaka Times
Source: UGC

According to 9ja Live Times, Father Abel Mwelwa invited the woman who also happens to be his lover to the parish house on the night of Holy Thursday, May 7.

Lusaka Times reported that Archbishop Alick Banda suspended the clergyman as the judicial vicar of the Archdiocese of Lusaka moments after the occurrence became public.

An official memo from the church also stated Father Mwelwa had ceased being the parish priest of Kaunda Square parish.

“I hereby wish to inform you that I have with immediate effect suspended the Very Rev. Ringford Abel Mwelwa from the priesthood indefinitely. With this suspension he ceases to be Parish Priest for Kaunda Square Parish as well as Judicial Vicar of the Archbishop of Lusaka,” a part of the memo read.

Married woman found dead in Catholic priest’s home who is reportedly her loverThe priest is said to have injected something in the woman in a bid to terminate her pregnancy. Photo: UGC
Source: UGC

A source close to the media said that the clergyman was mandated to pay for the funeral expenses by the deceased’s family.

As at the time of writing this report, the autopsy result for her death was not yet ready as the woman’s family urged the police to investigate the real cause of her death.

An unconfirmed source, however, said that the priest reportedly injected some substance into the deceased in an attempt to abort her pregnancy.

By Tuko.co.ke

Continue Reading

Africa

No home, no hope … It’s a dog’s life

Published

on

Deprived of work and access to aid, thousands of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa living in Morocco are struggling to make ends meet under Covid-19 restrictions.

“The misery is across the board,” said Ousmane Ba, head of the Collective of sub-Saharan Communities in Morocco.

“Those who worked as vendors are under lockdown without financial resources and the situation is getting worse for illegal migrants living in camps.

“They can’t go anywhere and non-government organisations can’t come to help them.” The north African kingdom has long been a transit country for migrants and refugees seeking a better life in Europe, and it has also become a host country for many.

At least 20,000, the vast majority from sub-Saharan Africa, are trapped “in a humanitarian emergency”, said sociologist Mehdi Alioua of the anti-racism foreigners’ support group Gadem.

Many of them work in the informal sector, which accounts for more than 20 per cent of Morocco’s economy, and tend to live precariously, hand to mouth, even in normal times. Parking attendants, cleaning women without contracts and street vendors lacking social security “are panicking” now and many “do not eat every day”, Alioua said.

To contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, Morocco — with 6,380 virus infections and 188 deaths officially recorded — imposed a lockdown throughout the country. A state of emergency declared on March 20 has been extended until May 20.

Controls are strict, movement is subject to authorisation and non-compliance with the restrictions is punishable by fines or one to three months’ jail.

The most vulnerable remain those who are looking to reach Europe by sea or by scaling barriers around the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla in Morocco’s north. Border closures and movement restrictions imposed under a public health state of emergency have piled new challenges onto the already dangerous journey.

While covert crossings into Spain have decreased since the start of the pandemic crisis, many people are still making the trip. A total of 986 arrivals were recorded between mid-March and early May, compared with 1,295 during the same period in 2019, according to the Spanish interior ministry. Morocco has also progressively become a host country, after launching two “regularisation” campaigns for migrants in recent years.

A migration policy adopted in 2013 led to 50,000 people — mostly from West Africa — receiving residency permits, according to government figures.

Additionally, non-government groups estimate, there are several thousand illegal immigrants currently in the kingdom.

Whatever their legal status, members of sub-Saharan communities are suffering the effects of a pandemic-induced economic paralysis.

“People don’t know what to do,” said Lokake Aimee, secretary-general of the Council of sub-Saharan Migrants in Morocco. “Those that didn’t save have problems. They used to go out every day to get money and now they are in trouble.”

The kingdom dispensed financial aid to employees and informal sector workers who lost their jobs amid the crisis, but no such steps were taken for migrants or immigrants.

Those who are legally in the kingdom also do not benefit from the state aid distributed to Moroccans.

“No one in the government had a word for these people, even as Morocco has invested so much in its migration policy,” Alioua said.

Solidarity within the community, the charity sector and Catholic parishes have alleviated some of the burden.

Abdoulaye Diop, head of the Federation of sub-Saharan associations in Morocco, organises food basket distribution within the Senegalese community.

Other groups have launched similar initiatives, but resources are limited, Diop said. “Today you eat rice, tomorrow pasta, the day after rice,” said Eouani Mambia Morelline, the 40-year-old Congolese head of a collective for migrant women in Morocco.

“And then, there are the bills and rents that are piling up … and who knows when we will get back to normal life.”

By AFP

Continue Reading


poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2019 Calendar

satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending

error: Content is protected !!