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We don’t want to play ‘reggae’ for bruised country, says Raila

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ODM leader Raila Odinga has said the Building Bridges Initiative will culminate in a historic referendum later this year but only after the country has successfully battled coronavirus and its impacts.

While speaking to Milele FM at his Karen home in Nairobi, Odinga (above) said that the BBI coordination team, comprising taskforce and the political wing was almost through with its mandate.

Therefore, what remains ahead is a small task to effect law changes.“Reggae (implying BBI) was going to give us constitutional changes and we were only remaining with rallies in Nairobi and Nakuru…there were already myriad of recommendations that required executive actions, legislative actions and other structural law changes to effect,” he said.

The ODM leader, however, did not go deeper into discussing the kinds of changes eyed in the constitutional amendments. With the government battling the coronavirus which has killed 52 people and infected more than 1,000 others; Odinga said that the team will give the executive time to focus on healing the economy first. “Before we resume the BBI and the referendum, we will take time to focus on helping people afflicted by the coronavirus, floods and the desert locusts,” he said.

He said that their intention as the steering team is to give the government ample time and support it in supporting the needy as the economy recovers from ruins inflicted by the pandemic.

READ ALSO:   Irate youths storm ODM headquarters demanding Raila be sworn in

“We want the government to repair the economy. We do not want to bring BBI politics into a country that is still grieving and hungry after the coronavirus menace. We have to revive the economy first,” he stated, adding that the referendum may come before the end of the year after the dust has settled on the pandemic.

Mr Odinga also lashed at “dynasty versus hustlers’’ politics saying that it lacks logic in Kenyan context. He argued that Kenya has never been ruled by a monarch hence the issue of dynasty should not arise.

He gave an example that Kenya’s first president the late Jomo Kenyatta rose from poverty as a metre reader and became the head of state. It took the reins of former president Daniel Moi and Mwai Kibaki for Kenyatta’s son Uhuru to occupy State House. This, Odinga said is a depiction that Kenya’s politics is based on individual effort and not hereditary.

“People have always voted for me as Raila Odinga and not as the son of Jaramogi,” he said. He urged Baringo Senator Gideon Moi not to be moved by the dynasty tag saying that the law allows him to vie for any position like any other Kenyan.

Recently, Senator Moi, who is the Chairman of Kanu signed a coalition pact with Jubilee party ahead of 2022 General Election.Raila emphasised that he and President Uhuru Kenyatta are committed to ensuring that the contents of their MoU see the light of day. Part of it he said include fighting corruption in the country and uniting the people that has been divided along ethnic lines. The ODM boss distanced himself from the storms rocking Jubilee.

READ ALSO:   Presidential social distancing

He said he could not comment on the decisions made by the ruling party because he is in another party.

But when asked whether he would team up with Deputy President William Ruto in 2022, he refused to respond to the question saying that part of BBI initiative is creating animosity between the people. He dropped in a line of a proverb in Kiswahili saying “Mvumilivu hula mbivu” (Patient one rejoices in good results) leaving the listeners guessing.

Raila praised Africa’s fight against the coronavirus saying that most countries especially Kenya and South Africa were leading in showing the gains and such can be assessed through low mortalities.

By Standard.co.ke

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Lifestyle

How once vibrant Nakuru estates have turned into criminal dens

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In the good old days, Kivumbini, Kaloleni, Flamingo, Paul Machanga, Baharini and Ojuka estates in Nakuru town were the most sought after residential areas for low income earners.

This was for a good reason.

Unlike other estates, these had all the amenities including round-the-clock water supply at a subsidised cost and a consistent supply of electricity.

Garbage collection was done weekly, making the estates some of the cleanest in Nakuru town, perhaps one of the reasons why it was regarded the cleanest in the region.

In addition, the houses were repainted at least twice a year and security was guaranteed with massive street lights strategically placed.

Residents of the golden 1980s and early 1990s era also remember well-maintained playgrounds for their children.

Over time, however, heaps of garbage started to appear and today, they have the areas an eyesore.

The estates are now a case study of poor planning and the social and economic implications have made life more difficult for residents.

Thanks to a booming population that has eaten up all the open spaces once reserved for backdoor gardening, makeshift iron sheet structures are a common sighting as some youths live in cubicles away from the parents they shared bedsitters with.

In the estates have arisen some of the deadliest gangs in Nakuru town, including one known as ‘Confirm’, whose members have turned some of the cubicles into their dens.

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A view of Flamingo Estate, Nakuru town, where one of ‘Confirm’ gang’s hideouts is located. PHOTO|FRANCIS MUREITHI |NATION MEDIA GROUP

READ ALSO:   We won't stop accepting money from 'corrupt' politicians, Bishop tells Raila

INSECURITY

For many residents and visitors to the town, the estates are now no-go zones.

Save for a few cobblers and people roasting maize along roads, the once vibrant shopping centres at Kivumbini and Flamingo estates are lifeless.

“The more disheartening thing is that no investors can put their money here because of the gangs. They will demand a protection fee and there is nothing you can do about it,” said a resident who operated a kiosk in one of the estates.

Other residents, who also refused to be named, blamed security agents and politicians for the increase in crime.

“More worrisome is the nonchalant attitude of security agents in dealing with the criminals, who reign supreme,” said a resident of Flamingo.

“Some politicians offer to pay bonds for criminal gangs and storm police stations demanding for their release,” said a resident of Kivumbini.

“Some bad elements in the police service have turned the gang into A cash cow. Once they arrest them they demand bribes and later release them,’ said a resident of Bondeni.

Nakuru County Commissioner Erustus Mbui Mwenda absolved security agents from blame and cited frustration in their efforts to nail politicians and the criminals involved.

“There is a case in court against a politician who wanted to burn a petrol station. The matter is still pending even though police did their work. You can’t blame police for justice delayed or denied,” said Mr Mbui.

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Kaloleni ‘C’ and Flamingo Phase Two estates in Nakuru twon, which stand next opposite each other and are barricaded with iron sheets due to a surge in crime in the area. PHOTO |FRANCIS MUREITHI |NATION MEDIA GROUP

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Raila did not withdraw from Oct 26th Presidential election - Supreme Court

NEW TACTICS

During a recent county engagement forum organised by Midrift Human Rights Network, to discuss how to prevent and counter violent extremism among the youth, Mr Mbui said the government was aware of all of the gangs’ tricks.

The administrator said members of the “Confirm” gang were using drones to disrupt law enforcement but noted that security agencies were taking the matter seriously.

As authorities seek solutions, residents continue to live in fear that their children will join the gangs.

“You can imagine the mental and psychological trauma most parents face, seeing their children being recruited into these gangs,” said Mr James Kanyotu, a resident of Flamingo Estate.

He said that with the Covid-19 pandemic, and the suspension of learning and other activities, many pupils were being targeted.

“This is a trying time for parents. With the reopening of schools pushed to next year, many are bound to join the gangs,” said Ms Jennifer Achieng’.

Authorities have expressed concerns that primary schools neighbouring the estates, such as Bondeni, St Theresa, Kisulisuli, Flamingo, Kimathi, St Paul’s, Bondeni and Baharini, are easy targets for radicalisation.

A boy in Kaloleni, who identified himself only as Tony, said the inconsistency in county and national government policies surrounding the matter and lack of political goodwill contribute to increased crime in the region.

READ ALSO:   Presidential social distancing

“Nearly all these estates were constructed before independence and have outlived their usefulness due to a bursting population, but you only hear the government talking big from a distance about expanding affordable housing for the poor. On the ground things are different,” he said.

Another youth said, “These ‘Confirm’ gangsters are smart and well educated youth who cannot even access the Kazi Kwa Vijana initiative because of corruption. This forces them to look for alternative means of survival. The only readily available ones are through criminal gangs.”

Midrift Executive Director Joseph Omondi said that to make Nakuru safe and tame crime, the county must implement the action plan for preventing and countering violent extremism.

“These criminal gangs whose membership increases by the day is a ticking time bomb that will explode if no action is taken, particularly as we hit the homestretch to the 2022 General Election,” he said.

by nation.co.ke

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Business

You can own this Bugatti La Voiture Noire car for only $19m or Ksh1.9B

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Most expensive cars in the world – what are they and how much do they cost? We’ve gathered a collection from 10 most expensive autos all over the world – from Bugatti Chiron with price tag $2,7 million to Bugatti эLa Voiture Noireэ for $19 million. Some of them are impossible to buy even you have required amount of money. LKat’s begin with Bugatti.

Bugatti has unveiled the “La Voiture Noire” translated as “the black car” made entirely from carbon fiber. The first one of the Limited Edition car has been sold for $19 million to Ferdinand Piech, the owner of VW group.

Designed by Salome Etienne, it is inspired by its predecessors Veyron and Chiron and the pre-war Type 57SC Atlantic.

Powered by an 8 liter, 16 cylinder engine that churns out a jaw-dropping 1,500 HP the car should be able to reach above 450 km/h. Bugatti has refused to reveal its performance specifications.

The front is dominated by the trademark horseshoe-shaped Bugatti grill and blends into an aerodynamically swept-back design with sloping windscreen and wrap-around tail lamps. Also be sure to check best free car website templates and themes.

Bugatti La Voiture Noire

Bugatti La Voiture Noire

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READ ALSO:   Raila leaves for Duke University in US, set to meet Kenyans in N Carolina
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Business

Smell of money: The millionaire chamas of Nairobi’s Marikiti market

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Wakulima Market or ‘Marikiti’ is one large pipeline of food to residents of Nairobi. It is noisy, dirty and has always been busy since opening shop in 1967. It’s not the kind of place anyone would imagine is a hub of millionaires.

But Maritiki, Kikuyu corruption for ‘market’,  has churned out millionaires in real coin on the back of trading in potatoes, tomatoes, hoho, nduma, nguace, maize, beans and assorted fruits. For starters, traders in the chaotic market have a collective business turnover of between Sh100 million and Sh500 million in a day! That’s before deduction of operating costs, according to Cyrus Kaguta Githaiga, the chair of Marikiti market  Such money can attract dark forces — which is why there are daily  interdenominational fellowship sessions to fight juju. Though initially meant for 300 traders, the market now serves over 20, 000 people, comprising farmers, wholesalers, brokers, retailers, vendors, handcart pushers and the kua – the carriers on whose backs and shoulders sacks reach different bus stops en-route to the soko and then your plate.

The profit margins are eye-watering. A trader can go home with anything between Sh10,000and to Sh50,000 in one day. The bulk of traders are members of the Wakulima Market Traders Association Group, the chama which collectively run different businesses, including trucks, parcels of land in Thika, Juja and Ruai, besides owning several buildings around Kenya. There are also other chamas, mostly operated by women since the 1970s when, like all chamas, they started with dishing out money merry-go-round style in the 1970s. Some early members died and their children inherited the shares.

READ ALSO:   We won't stop accepting money from 'corrupt' politicians, Bishop tells Raila

The contribution is mandatory and one is fined for failing to make a contribution in time. A normal group has between 10 to 20 members who contribute between Sh500 and Sh1,000 a week.

The high rollers are in a different league, as they contribute Sh10,000 or more daily. Faridah Oronga a trader at Marikiti says through the chama, “I have educated my children and made other investments. Our chama has bought parcels of land valued at millions of shillings. I will get my share the day we decide to dispose of the lands. We have also invested in lorries that transport goods to various parts of the country.” Faridah adds that besides business, the chama also serves as a social welfare group. Each member contributes Sh1,000 to a sick member and “it is a must to contribute. Those who fail to contribute will also not get any help when they are in need.

During burials, we hire a bus and select a few individuals to represent us. We don’t let our own to suffer. We live as a family.” Salome Wanjiru has been operating at Marikiti since 1997 and says that “we oil the economy,” besides making individual investments like buying land in Ruai.

She says most Nairobians perceive them as simple market women yet “we own several buildings” and money from the chama has boosted her “dairy and poultry farming business back in the village, and all my children have completed university.” The traders also have access to readily available loans. Margaret Muthoni, a trader, says they borrow small guaranteed loans in the morning and repay in the evening.

READ ALSO:   Ruto backs Sonko to make  a comeback

“I make enough to pay back the principal and keep the profit. The secret is to take advantage of the compounding interest.”

Women sell groceries at the Marikiti market in the morning. [File, Standard]

The market has 28 different sections with different products and thus, different chamas. Those dealing in potatoes and onions could for instance have their own chamas.

There are 20,000 non-registered and 8,000 registered members, but all groups fall under All Wakulima Market Traders Association with an elected chair.

Money collected by all the chamas easily oscillated between Sh100 million and Sh500 million in a day and Githaiga is proud: “We have created wealth and are successful. Most of us have built homes, own matatus and made investments worth millions of shillings using this concept. We realised that this initiative is a powerful tool, which has a lot of benefits.” Githaiga ensures all traders’ rights are respected, besides providing a conducive environment for working.

“We pushed for the closure of betting shops near the market because traders were becoming lazy and spent their earnings betting. Every day, we have a fellowship at 6am through Wakulima Interdenominational Pastors Welfare to fight juju,” he explained.

Githaiga says some of the biggest challenges is garbage disposal and “hawkers who create congestion on the roads adjacent to the market. Hawkers are good investors if they are managed well, but should be designated on less busy roads.”

READ ALSO:   VIDEO: Raila did not withdraw from Oct 26th Presidential election - Supreme Court

Githaiga wants the county government to look into, among others; the expansion of Marikiti besides, improving its drainage system, refuse disposal and recycling of garbage.

Other downsides are that “many people don’t like coming to the market because they say it is dirty and insecure.” He says that for the chama to be successful, 100 per cent integrity is a must and rules should be set in such a way that if someone breaches them, they are fined.

Discipline is key.” Stella adds that to understand table banking, one has to look at cooperatives as a bigger version of table banking with the difference being that they have “greater numbers and systems to control the numbers, but the bigger the number, the larger the complications.

However, they’re  regulated and you can save and borrow three times your savings and at friendly interest rates.” One problem with cooperatives is that shares are controlled as some put a cap on monthly contributions, besides resolutions being passed during an AGM.

By Ghaflaco.ke

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