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KCSE A-listers who went for diplomas

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They came out tops in last year’s KCSE examinations and were assured of admission to prestigious degree courses and universities of their choice, but they have chosen a different path.

Bruno Sharif Kahindi, who scored an A of 81 points and who would have been enrolled to pursue a medicine course at the University of Nairobi, will instead join the Nairobi Technical Training Institute for a diploma in pharmaceutical technology.

His counterpart Titus Mokaya Ogamba, who scored an A- of 80 points, will trot to Masinde Muliro University to enroll for a diploma in music and dance.

The pair join more than 2,000 students who qualified for university admission last year, but who have opted to pursue diploma courses in technical and vocational institutions.

Statistics from the Kenya Universities and Colleges Central Placement Service (KUCCPS) shows that 2,632 candidates, who would have been enrolled for university degrees, have instead been offered places in Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges.

Other top performers in last year’s Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education examinations, who have chosen to join TVET colleges, are Emily Muhoria, who scored an A- and will study a diploma in chemical engineering and Mohamed Dowa, who has been admitted to Kagumo Teachers Training College to study a diploma in education despite scoring an A-.

KUCCPS data released on Tuesday also shows that 280 candidates who scored a B plain and above opted for diplomas in TVET colleges, snubbing some of the most competitive degree programmes in both public and private universities.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

The students, who Education Cabinet Secretary George Magoha described as TVET champions, include 11 students with A- and 66 with B+.

On Wednesday, KUCCPS chief executive John Muraguri explained that the top candidates were placed in institutions of their choices.

“We had applications made in schools, they did first and second revision and most of them affirmed that they wanted to study those courses,” he said on the telephone.

He said a number of students do not see the need to study for degree courses when they can take diploma courses which have more prospects in terms of employment and job opportunities.

However, he regretted that some learners only applied for courses while in secondary schools and did not make any follow up during revision.

“We therefore had no choice, but to place them where they wanted. But they will have an opportunity for transfers,” Mr Muraguri said.

School application marked the beginning of the placement process that saw applications from 2,228 of the 10,289 registered schools submit their candidates’ choices/preferences, which translated to 21.65 per cent.

“The placement board is concerned about this low participation of schools at this important stage of the placement process.

‘‘To address this concern, the board recommends to the Ministry of Education that it considers issuing a policy guideline to all schools, especially those with candidates eligible for placement to TVET institutions, to ensure that they submit the applications on behalf of their KCSE candidates for university and TVET placement,” Mr Muraguri said.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

The TVET candidates were among 125,463 others who were eligible for placement to degree programmes.

Majority of the students opted for engineering, building and civil engineering, information technology, architecture, electrical and electric engineering, aeronautical engineering, pharmaceutical technology, civil engineering, computer science and building economics (quantity surveying), among others.

The most sought-after colleges, which offer diplomas in technical courses, are the Technical University of Kenya, Technical University of Mombasa and national polytechnics.

Kenya Union of Post Primary Education Teachers (Kuppet) secretary-general Akelo Misori said that unlike in the past, students are now taking courses that add value.

“We should support TVET sector because that is the future and we should allow students to take courses of their choice,” Mr Misori said.

He urged the government to strengthen career guidance in schools so that learners are advised accordingly.

He said many schools still struggle in terms of developing capacities of teachers to guide students on the right courses to pursue after secondary school.

Kenya should not be left behind

Educationist Andiwo Obondo said the world is moving towards TVET and Kenya should not be left behind.

“The decade of campaign is paying off now as we are giving premiums to TVET courses. Technology and engineering are now the drivers of the economy, and we must put emphasis on them,” he said, although he wants the government to improve facilities so that more students can get quality education.

“KUCCPS needs to do away with Sh500 application fee for those joining colleges and universities as it discourages learners to apply because they see it as extra cost to their parents,” Kenya Secondary School Heads Association (Kessha) chairman Kahi Indimuli said.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

According to KUCCPS, 276,163 TVET programme vacancies were provided for placement with 88,724 applicants, translating to only 32 per cent of the total capacity.

The government plans to have 1,540 vocational training centres across the country by 2022 with each of the 290 constituencies having a technical college.

The government has also identified more than 10 national polytechnics to be centres of excellence in a move that seeks to attract more students who usually prefer to join universities.

Figures released on Tuesday show that 54.2 per cent or 66,661 of the 122,831 students placed to degree courses will join science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programmes. In comparison, arts and humanities attracted 56,170 students or 45.7 per cent.

Some 2,632 candidates who scored C+ and above in the 2019 KCSE examination and qualified for placement to degree programmes opted for diploma courses in technical institutions.

Prof Magoha said the number of students preferring to join TVETs has been growing over time.

“In 2019, the number was 1,269. This is a clear indication that concerted efforts to improve enrolment in TVET courses are yielding fruits,” he said.

He admitted that low uptake of courses in TVET institutions has been because of negative attitude by parents and students.

By Nation.co.ke

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Education

Echoes of reggae as Rastafarian admitted to Bar

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When Buju Banton sang the lyrics, “only Rasta can liberate the people,” in his popular 1997 song Hills and Valleys, he did not have in mind the kind of liberation that the Rastafarian community could have years later upon their admission of one of their own to the Bar.

On Friday, Mathenge Mukundi, donning a blue turban set history when he walked to the Supreme Court building where he was admitted to the Bar becoming Kenya’s first advocate of the Rastafarian faith.

“As a diehard human rights and fundamental freedoms enthusiast, I will work towards fighting for the rights of minorities and marginalised groups,” he told the Nation Saturday.

Mr Mukundi did his KCSE in 2012 at Othaya Boys High School before joining Kenyatta University for a law degree.

“According to our policy to give opportunities to diverse members of the society, Mr Mathenge Mukundi, a practicing Rastafarian, did pupillage with us last year and was admitted to the Bar as an advocate yesterday. Congratulations to him,” Kenya’s National Council for Law Reporting tweeted.

Mr Mukundi was admitted alongside 197 new advocates who included Cabinet Secretary Amina Mohamed.

Although CS Mohamed was gazetted in 2013 after finalising her studies at the Kenya School of Law, she was yet to sign the Roll of Advocates, a requirement before one is officially allowed to become one.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

Mr Mukundi’s admission to the Bar is historic as most countries including neighbour Uganda do not allow Rastafarians to become advocates.

But liberalism in the conservative law practise is not just growing in Kenya but also other countries. Newly appointed Malawi Attorney-General Chikosa Silungwe was trending on the social media not because of his vast law experience but rather his dreadlocked hair style.

Locally, lawyer Bob Mkhangi also spots deadlocks.

Since independence, Rastafarians have been fighting for their rights.

Rastafari is an Africa-centred religion, which can be traced to Jamaica in the 1930s after Haile Selassie I (1892-1975) — referred to as the king of kings, lord of lords, the conquering lion of the tribe of Judah — was coronated as King of Ethiopia.

Many of their teachings are also developed from the ideas of Jamaican activist Marcus Mosiah Garvey.

But it is only until last year when the courts ruled that Rastafarianism is a religion just like any other and they should be treated as the rest.

Justice Chacha Mwita made the judgement in a case in which a minor was chased away from school in January 2019 for having dreadlocks.

The judge based his ruling on Article 30 (1) of the constitution which states that every person has the right to freedom of conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

Rastafarians follow biblical teachings found in various books, including Numbers 6: 1-6 and Leviticus 21: 5 – 6, which among others prohibit eating certain foods and cutting of the hair, as a sign of their dedication to God’s teachings.

Consequently, they keep their hair as a manifestation of their faith.

Rastafarians say that they keep “rastas” and not “dreadlocks” arguing that rastas is a sign of faith as opposed to “dreadlocks” which is one’s choice or style.

By Sunday Nation

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Covid-19: US gives Kenya Sh5bn

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The US says it will provide Sh5 billion to support Kenya’s Health sector and economic recovery.

Through the US Agency for International Development (USAID), Washington announced the support for Kenya’s Covid-19 response and recovery efforts to meet immediate and longer-term challenges that the virus is posing.

US Ambassador to Kenya Kyle McCarter said that they are focusing on ensuring resources get to the counties and local communities.

“The American people have always been generous to those in need around the world, and today Kenya is facing the compound challenges of Covid-19, flooding and locusts,” he said.

Nearly Sh610 million of this cash will ensure children are educated through distance learning, young people gain jobs in emerging areas, and citizen-responsive governance helps mitigate possible conflict, violence, and civil unrest.

USAID Mission Director Mark Meassick said that the funds will directly benefit Kenyans.

“We partner with the Kenyan government, NGOs, civil society and local organisations and institutions to support the Kenyan people. The US requires our partners to adhere to rigorous reporting requirements and standards,” Mr Meassick said.

To date, and with support from the US, more than 1,600 health workers have been trained in 35 counties.

272,000 Ministry of Health posters on the prevention and symptoms of Covid-19 have also printed and distributed across 23 high-risk counties, personal protective equipment (PPEs) repurposed from the Ebola outbreak to protect health care workers and labs provided with diagnostic and capacity-building support.

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

By Nation.co.ke

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Education

‘My parents were afraid I’d fail exams,’ Nameless remembers his graduation day at UoN

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Singer David Mathenge aka Nameless is one of the most learned musicians around. The father of two started his singing career back in the day when he was still studying Architecture at the University of Nairobi.

Nameless was among the talents behind the architecture of The Hub shopping Mall in Karen.

Just like any other parents, Nameless’ didn’t support his career at first and he revealed that they thought he would fail his exams at the university.

But shock on them on his graduation, he had passed with flying colours.

‘FBF to my graduation day…My parents were Sooo tensed that I may fail my final year exams because of my music career taking off while still in campo, ndio maana mum ana smile from ear to ear in relief😅😅!! Hawakuwa wanajua Mimi ni mnoma kwa design😎🤨… Otherwise musijudge look yangu , I had to look innocent infront of my paroz bana 🤷🏾‍♂️… Na hiyo ni durag under the graduation hat 🧐😂… After this nilivua specs Nika vaa shades nikaenda Carnivore kufunga show,’ he posted accompanied by the photo below.

Nameless
Nameless and his parents

Nameless met his wife Wahu Kagwi, a fellow artiste while still in campus. They studied at the same university.

Check out comments on his post

READ ALSO:   Parents of top 2018 KCSE student address her placement to Technical University

wahukagwi After all the transnighting I did with you half this degree is mine

karwaay Are we going to talk about that tie ama nikanyagie?😂😂

bienaimesol Always a G

miss.muya You kinda look like Bien of Sauti sol

derekmwai Icon, thank you for motivation back in Highie🤓 ride kwa Surf ilikuwa something💪

davidmuriithi This is how I remember you aki.

kaydeelethal @namelesskenya waaaaaay before u are aromat

matrieyann Mungu nifundishe kunyamaza😂😂😂

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