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Woman dies in botched abortion

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Police in Vihiga County are holding a quack doctor after a woman she was helping procure an abortion died in the process, County Police Commander Leonard Omolo said on Thursday.

Linda Indava, 29, had been taken to the quack’s home in Cheptulu by her husband after he suspected that she was unfaithful.

Police also arrested the man whom Mr Omolo said will be charged with murder on Friday.

The man had reportedly indicated that he was not responsible for his wife’s pregnancy.

MURDER CHARGE

The two are being held at Serem Police Station and will be charged with murder. The quack sells water during the day and turns into a “doctor” at night.

“The man was in doubt about who was responsible for the pregnancy of his wife. He therefore decided that the pregnancy should be terminated,” said Mr Omolo.

During the botched patio, Ms Indava became unconscious and died, prompting the police to be called in.

Mr Omolo said officers visited the scene of crime and apprehended the two suspects.

“Investigations have been launched and the two will be charged tomorrow (Friday) with murder,” he said.

The dead woman’s body was taken Kaimosi mortuary pending post-mortem.

By Nation.co.ke

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Health

Why I chose to have my breast cut off

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Lucy Njeri vividly recalls the horrors she underwent on the day she received the test results showing she had breast cancer.

“It took me by surprise,” Lucy says. “Emotionally, I went down. I tried to clear my tears, since I was still in the office, but immediately I left the gate, I broke down and cried. I was all by myself. I was not ready for it.”

The result indicated she had ductal carcinoma [cancer that starts in cells that line the milk ducts), grade 1. The news hit her like a ton of bricks. And so she sat at the gate to her workplace, wrapped in colossal agony, struggling to come to terms with her new, sorry predicament. She was still nursing emotional bruises sustained by her mothers lengthy battle with throat cancer. Now here she was, physically sick from a similarly debilitating malady.

Just then, a complete stranger, touched by the sight of a lonesome lady crying her heart out, approached to help.

“This passer-by tapped my back and asked me, ‘is it okay’? I shook my head, and gave her my results. She read and told me it was go ing to be okay. She asked if she could call my mum. I told her no, she cannot call anyone in my family, since everyone was sick emotionally,” she explains.

Thus had begun Lucy’s long battle with breast cancer, a journey which, for many people, is beset with uncertainties and excruciating consequences on a person’s material and emotional well being. For Lucy at least, she had a shoulder to lean on right from the onset, and this assuaged pangs of grief that had belligerently gripped the mother of three on that fateful day.

Lucy’s newly found comforter cut short her journey, offered to buy her a meal and they walked to a nearby restaurant. But Lucy couldn’t eat. She cried her heart out the whole afternoon. She later gave the Samaritan the phone contact of one of her relatives, who came to pick her up.

“At night, I could not digest what I had read”, Lucy narrates, fighting back tears. “The next thing in my mind was committing suicide. I had seen anguish and pain my mum was going through. I was not ready for it.”

As luck would have it, Lucy wouldn’t hang herself that night. She didn’t find a place to hang herself in the house. But she cried the whole night.

On waking up the next morning, her uncle candidly advised her to brace for the new reality. It was time to summon her inner strength, and face her condition head-on.

“My uncle told me to face the lion, and fight it,” she adds. The words served to buoy her through the turmoil. But another calamity lay ahead – nurses were on strike, and her hospital couldn’t take her in. Her doctor advised her to seek surgery elsewhere. After weighing her options, Lucy settled on Kenyatta National Hospital, where she was booked for surgery.

“I had my breast removed,” she says.

Just before the mastectomy, a medic had counselled Lucy to be positive about the consequences. There are people without breasts out there, the medic told her. They are surviving, and they’re okay. So, there is nothing to worry about. Life has to go on.

With these words, Lucy mustered the courage to go through it. And she bubbles with joy, noting hers was a choice between living with one breast or dying to maintain the image. She chose life.

“I have seen people who resist treatment,
who say their breast(s) cannot be removed, and we lose them. I’d rather not have the breast, and be alive. I am lucky to have one. I have seen people who don’t have both, and they’re still there. Since then, I look at life from a different perspective”.

Thankfully, Lucy’s NHIF covered her treatment. This included six chemotherapies, radiotherapy, follow-up treatment and hormonal therapy.

Constant support This was a tough time for Lucy’s three children, who underwent manifold emotional excursions in these trying moments. They wondered at spike in visitors to their home. They’d been told their mother was sick, but couldn’t quite relate with the sickness. Lucy requested help from a friend who broke down the news to her children, while assuring them that mum would be okay. She recalls the news was particularly devastating to her daughter.

Now a fully recovered and ebullient cancer survivor, Lucy recounts her journey through the malaise with appreciation for galaxy of magnanimous supporters who held her hand through the predicament.

Right from the benevolent stranger who took her time to comfort Lucy in her low moments at the gate, to her circle of friends that helped her raise money for biopsy, her relatives, her husband and children, and neighbours, some of who would do her laundry, look after her children and even provided foodstuff and paid house rent in the bleak moments. There was even a matatu crew that would wait for her early in the morning on the days she went for treatment. And of tremendous importance to her journey, have been the healthcare providers who handled her condition.

“There are people you can’t even pay,” Lucy says. “I got a lot of help from neighbours and friends and even strangers.”

Her journey encapsulates the importance of a support network in the healing process of a breast cancer patient. As the world celebrates the Breast Cancer Awareness month, a call is made upon everyone to lend a helping hand and a supportive shoulder for those caught up in the throes of this exacting malady, a malady that deals long-lasting blows on the purses and hearts of hundreds of households it afflicts.

by PD.co.ke

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Health

Youths are dying of depression as their helpless parents sit by

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It used to be that, whenever I read articles in the newspaper or watched news about children as young as 13 taking their lives, I often wondered why anyone would do that. Now I understand.

I once approached my parents about my deteriorating mental health and all they said was “you, youngsters are too sensitive”.

This was confusing. What did it mean? I wondered whether there was something wrong with reaching out for help. That statement discouraged me from ever talking about my struggle. I also accepted that our parents simply do not know what to do and how to help. I also know that I am not the only one who has experienced this. For most of my age mates, the issue seems to be the same — they do not have anyone to talk to.

When they try to talk, the situation gets worse. I just wish that they would take us for therapy or the hospital where we can find the counsellors who are trained to handle the issues that affect us.

Generational curse

I wish our parents paid attention to us, so that we are not only better people now but are also better parents to the children we will have in the future. The way they are relating to us reveals something akin to a generational curse.

I have not put my finger on it but it could be internalised self-hate or the fear of disappointment. I see that the way our parents treat us is the same way they handle their own issues. They do not want to seek medical help even when they know they are unwell.

They do not have healthy relationships and friendships, and do not want us to either.  I hope that our parents will be able to approach mental health with the seriousness it deserves.

Suicide

They wait until someone around them dies by suicide, then join the world in posting “rest in peace” or “you are missed” on social media. The parents of those who have been affected will be mobilised to help the bereaved.

Everyone will then move on with their life, until someone else takes their life and the cycle continues.

by nation.co.ke

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Health

‘My exes left fearing I couldn’t conceive,’ Ruth Matete on life threatening condition

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Gospel artiste and pastor Ruth Matete has for the first time revealed that she had to undergo surgery when she was 14 to remove clotted blood in her uterus.

The heavily pregnant singer, who lost her husband in April this year, said that doctors told her she might not be able to conceive.

Ruth Matete

Sharing her battle with an imperforate hymen, a congenital disorder where a hymen without an opening completely obstructs the vagina. It is caused by a failure of the hymen to perforate during fetal development. It is most often diagnosed in adolescent girls when menstrual blood accumulates in the vagina and sometimes also in the uterus, she wrote,

I was born with this condition. I found out when I was 14 years old. I had started my periods but didn’t know. My hymen was closed so there was no through way for the blood to come out. I remember being rushed to the hospital that night. The doctor insisted I had something in my uterus and it had been there for three months..whaaat😳😳😳😳. So he insisted that I say the truth. But all I could do was cry coz of the excruciating pain I was having.  I told my aunt and doctor that I wasn’t pregnant. I had never been with a man before. The doctor then said he would check to confirm if it was what he was suspecting even though it’s rare. We checked and he confirmed it was what he suspected. My hymen was closed. He said that if we didn’t do a surgery that night, my chances of surviving were minimal. So I had to go in for an emergency surgery. The blood had been staying in my uterus all this while. Three months.
It was so painful healing from the surgery. Because unlike other wounds, my wound had to heal while open. So dressing was done every three days. Yani the pain. Oh Lord!! Anyway, I healed.  The doctor said that there could be a chance that my uterus had been messed up by the blood and it may be tricky for me to conceive. Wueh!!

She continued;

‘So I lived my life in fear wondering if I would be able to conceive. But to cut the already long story short, that was not the case. I remember sharing with some guys I dated the fact that I may not be able to give them children and that’s how the relationship ended. Hivyo ndio walikanyaga kubwa kubwa😂😂

I met my late husband and when I shared, he just asked me one question.
“Do you want children of your own?”
I said “yes”
Then he told me to tell God and believe that I’ll have children. I was so encouraged by how he didn’t see it as a big deal.  Few years of dating and we got married. Few months down the line and we conceived. Wah!! I was in tears. You know? I was believing God that He would give me children of my own. But it still was and is a miracle to me. Remembering what the doctor told me when I was 14 years old. The other day I asked Him (God) what will happen because I wanted six children. But now, the way things turned out. Anyway, He answered me like He always does. I won’t tell you what He told me… Anyway, I know I haven’t held my child in my arms yet. But the fact that I conceived, is enough reason to thank God. The fact that I came this far, it can only be God. I am here testifying of the Lord’s doing.’

Ruth, who’s heavily pregnant with her first child, a baby boy said she was not scared of death but afraid of dying without fulfilling her purpose on earth.

One, I could have died that night. But I did not. Two, the surgery was successful and I was able to conceive.  I have decided to speak faith till I see and hold my child in my arms. So friend, if you see me celebrate this pregnancy and enjoying myself and having the time of my life, please understand. I am not boasting. I am rejoicing. Oh! Come and see what the Lord has done. I am not ignorant of the devices of the enemy. So I keep praying and speaking life till the end. The God who started this good work, shall be faithful to bring it to completion. In the name of Jesus Christ. All to the glory of His name. Please be encouraged. There is nothing God cannot do if only we trust in Him. You may not be believing God for a child, but something else..even that, He is more than able to give it to you. 

Since my husband went to be with the Lord, I realised how fickle and short life is. I probably will mourn him forever and somehow learn to live with the pain because I don’t know if the pain ever goes away. But also, I decided I will do what I can in the kingdom of God. I am not scared of death. I am scared of dying without fulfilling my purpose here on earth. When my day comes to meet my maker, I want to hear Him say, ‘well done. Good and faithful servant. You can come in” So I will keep sharing my life and serving God till then. All these I do to bring glory to God Almighty. Please keep me in your prayers even as I await the manifestation of this miracle.’

By Mpasho.co.ke

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