Connect with us

Lifestyle

Guns for hire: The political goons of Central Kenya

Published

on

They are brutal, loud and disruptive, with their only goal being to prematurely end any meeting of a politician they do not agree with. They mostly comprise political activists, casual labourers and boda boda riders and their services go for anything between Sh500 and Sh2,000.

Ideally, they will sit in meetings pretending to be residents following the proceedings only to cause chaos later.

Political violence witnessed in Murang’a recently came as a shock to many, with the general opinion being that the sights are uncommon within central Kenya.

While this is partly true, the fact is, last week’s happenings are a replica of past political events in Mt Kenya and a growing political trend.

Kieleweke and Tangatanga factions of the ruling Jubilee Party play the roles of both protagonist and antagonist depending on who is hosting the meetings.

The mission usually is to make sure the meetings either do not happen or do not go according to plan.

At the centre of the chaos are politicians themselves and hired goons who take the frontline in the disruptive missions.

Political gangs

Usually, the youths are paid to attend meetings and heckle and disrupt any political rally they do not agree with.

According to long-serving career administrator Joseph Kaguthi, political competition became a matter of the monied and the crudely daring that saw the emergence of political gangs squeezed off any drip of humanity, ready to kill, maim and displace at the mention of a handout.

“Kenyans will remember that by 1997 when we held our second multi-party general election, nearly all politicians had an own ragtag militia armed to battle competition. It was a new phenomenon and security agencies had not anticipated the challenge hence why the country was caught terrible on the wrong footing as death toll started to rise in political contests,” he told the Nation.

Mr Kaguthi said the problem became entrenched because politicians have this uncanny cheek of uniting behind their own causes—and the government politicians united with their opposition comrades to advance use of political jeshis.

Security agents

“This left security agents divided and with no manual to action to refer to since if the big man was having jeshis together with his allies in ruling parties, how would they crack down on them? The opposition politicians took cue and by 2007 when the use of militias exploded on us to give rise to politically instigated violence that drew the wrath of the International Criminal Court (ICC), our python that we had nurtured had matured,” he says.

By last year when he quit as national chairman of Nyumba Kumi Security initiative, he says the gangs were firmly in place waiting for financiers to show up.

Last week, Interior PS Karanja Kibicho told the Nation that “the security agents will not be a passive onlooker as youths get wasted in dangerous games that some of our politicians play.”

He said the government is going to get into the nervous system of political gangs and induce a total paralysis in them.

By nation.co.ke

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Entertainment

Official video of Kenyan MPs participating in ‘Jerusalema Challenge’ released

Published

on

The awaited video of Kenyan politicians dancing to the ‘Jerusalama’ hit song has finally been uploaded on their Kenya’s National Assembly YouTube.

This comes just a few weeks after Suba North MP Millie Odhiambo proposed this motion in parliament; hoping to be the first parliament in the world to take part in the challenge. And for a minute many assumed that this could not work; until the video finally surfaced on online on Wednesday, 21 October.

Probably because this challenge had already been exhausted by many judging from the many videos of the challenge circulating on social media.

Kenyan politicians participate in Jerusalema video

Anyway, whether you like it or not, Kenyan politicians have gone ahead to release a new video; showing off their dance moves in their ‘Jerusalama challenge.‘ In a video shared less than 2 hours ago, the many politicians are seen grooving to the South African hit song….. and we love it!

By Ghafla.com

Continue Reading

Lifestyle

Tweeting chief Francis Kariuki is dead

Published

on

Nakuru’s Lanet Umoja location Chief Francis Kariuki, popularly known as the ‘tweeting chief’, is dead.

His family said he died at the Nakuru Level Five Hospital, where he was rushed to for emergency treatment after experiencing breathing difficulties.

The tweeting chief died at the age of 55 years.

“My father fell ill on Tuesday and we first took him to Evans Sunrise Hospital in Nakuru before he was referred to the Nakuru Level Five Hospital, where he passed on, while receiving treatment,” his son, Ken Kariuki, told the Nation on phone.

His daughter revealed that Chief Kariuki has been ailing from diabetes for a long time.

The tech-savvy village chief of Lanet Umoja was known for using Twitter and other social media platforms to discharge his duties.

He received global attention in 2014 for using Twitter to fight crime.

Mr Kariuki led a community of more than 30,000 residents.

Via text message

His Twitter account shows he has about 60,000 followers and those who receive his tweets via text message are said to be in the thousands.

Subscribers get his tweets in real-time via free text messages and don’t need to have a Twitter account or an internet connection.

The chief could send them at any time of the day or night using his smartphone.

By the time of his death,

‘s tweeting had reduced the crime rate in Lanet Umoja.

He also used Twitter to encourage unemployed youth through messages of hope.

Early life

He was born and raised in Nakuru and attended Mereroni Primary School. He later joined Lanet Secondary School and Kigari Teachers Training College later.

He taught for 21 years in different schools as a teacher, four years as a deputy head teacher and six years as a head teacher at Lords School, Kambi Moto in Rongai Sub-County.

In 2009, he became the first chief of Lanet Umoja.

In 2015, he graduated with a degree in Counseling Psychology from Mount Kenya University, which he had been pursuing through virtual learning.

by nation.co.ke

Continue Reading

Business

Keeping our family coffee business picking

Published

on

When 41 -year-old Gitau Waweru Karanja was a boy, he recalls spending his school holidays in his grandfather’s coffee farm with his cousins. His late grandmother would push them to pick berries to earn pocket money. Though he took up his parents’ passion in interior design and studied Interior Design in Kwa Zulu Natal University in South Africa, he did he know that one day he would wake up and smell the coffee and participate in running his grandfather’s coffee farm.

Gitau is the third generation of his family to manage Karunguru Farm, which belonged to his late grandfather Geoffrey Kareithi. Kareithi had bought the 300-acre farm in Ruiru, from a white settler in 1972. Gitau is married to Wangeci Gitau who grew up in Maragwa, in Murang’a where they also had a coffee farm.

Values instilled

For Wangeci, despite growing up in the coffee fields, she was more passionate about tourism and was a travel consultant before becoming a tour manager at a local company.

In 2012, she got an ectopic pregnancy, which put her on bed rest and thus was compelled to quit her job. When she recovered, she began assisting her husband. “By that time, my husband was selling modern house doors, but the business took a while to pick. Then we began selling milk from Karunguru Farm, but the milk production went down in 2016. The management, comprising of family members, told us to address the issue by becoming dairy managers. But when we joined the management of Karunguru Farm, we saw an opportunity in coffee tours,” she says.

Taking cue from South Africa where they do wine tourism and also export wine, Gitau and his wife sought to use that knowledge in their coffee farm. “We started Karunguru Coffee and Tours after we found out that despite it being our main export, it was being underutilised when it comes to tourism. So, here we take visitors through the journey that coffee has to go through before getting to your cup,” explains Gitau. Everything is done in Karunguru Farm— including value addition such as processing coffee, drying and even roasting. “We have our very own packaged Karunguru Coffee, which is available in the market,” he adds.

Their late grandfather instilled in them a love for each other and every holiday it is the family culture to meet and bond as a family. The grandpa also ensured that the farm management is shared amongst all his seven children who meet every week to discuss the business of the farm. Once they come to an unanimous decision, it is then passed on to their children, who implements their decision.

Before one is given any role, you have _ . to be qualified for the position. “It’s not about being favoured, but your qualification. I am in tourism, so I handle the tourism aspect, my husband is in operations. In fact, one applies for the position and then you are interviewed. If you qualify, you are placed on probation until the management is satisfied that you can handle the role well,” says Wangeci.

No entitlement

What makes family business go down is the fact that people who are less qualified are employed. Other people have to cover up for their messes and this creates bitterness and conflict. Gitau sometimes watches his nephews and nieces in the farm, giving them roles to check out whether they have interest in the farm or not before beginning to mentor them. Everyone begins from the lowest level and must know how to roast, pack, as well as prepare a cup of Karunguru coffee. This is to en inculcate the spirit of appreciation and value for the workers employed to do the role.

“My uncles always tell us that we didn’t come in the business because we are their children, but because of the passion we had in the business. With that, entitlement is killed and we ensure that we do our best to take the farm to higher levels,” says Gitau

They don’t entertain gossip,  ‘‘ but if someone has an issue, I then the person is invited ‘ to a meeting where one is confronted and told in love where they have missed the mark.

by PD.co.ke

Continue Reading


poapay3

Like us on Facebook, stay informed

NEWS TRENDING RIGHT NOW

2020 Calendar

October 2020
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
satellite-communication1.jpg

Trending

error: Content is protected !!